A Common Faith

Etukansi
Yale University Press, 1991 - 96 sivua
One of America's greatest philosophers outlines a faith that is not confined to sect, class, or race. Dr. Dewey calls for the emancipation of the true religious quality from the heritage of dogmatism and supernaturalism that characterizes historical religions. He describes a positive, practical, and dynamic faith, verified and supported by the intellect and evolving with the progress of social and scientific knowledge.
"The pure distillation of the thought of a great mind on the great subject of religion."--John Haynes Holmes, New York Herald Tribune

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LibraryThing Review

Käyttäjän arvio  - temsmail - LibraryThing

This is the book that set back education 1,000 years. Here Dewey elucidates his ideas about what is acceptable in religion and how it is to be excluded from the classrooms of America. This became the ... Lue koko arvostelu

Tietoja kirjailijasta (1991)

John Dewey was born in 1859 in Burlington, Vermont. He founded the Laboratory School at the University of Chicago in 1896 to apply his original theories of learning based on pragmatism and "directed living." This combination of learning with concrete activities and practical experience helped earn him the title, "father of progressive education." After leaving Chicago he went to Columbia University as a professor of philosophy from 1904 to 1930, bringing his educational philosophy to the Teachers College there. Dewey was known and consulted internationally for his opinions on a wide variety of social, educational and political issues. His many books on these topics began with Psychology (1887), and include The School and Society (1899), Experience and Nature (1925), and Freedom and Culture (1939).Dewey died of pneumonia in 1952.

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