The Proper Study of Mankind: An Anthology of Essays

Etukansi
Chatto & Windus, 1997 - 667 sivua
This selection of the best of Berlin's essays seeks to represent the full range of his work. The opening sections include Berlin's defence of philosophy and history against assimilation to the methods of science; his seminal essays on liberty, which created the framework for subsequent discussion; and his exposition of his most distinctive doctrine - pluralism - which recognizes that equally good ultimate values may come into mortal conflict. These are followed by studies of Machiavelli, Vico and Herder, essays on Russian writers, and portraits of important contemporaries from Akhmatova and Pasternak to Churchill and Roosevelt. Thus this volume aims to encapsulate the principle movements that characterize the modern age.

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Mitä ihmiset sanovat - Kirjoita arvostelu

The proper study of mankind: an anthology of essays

Käyttäjän arvio  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Oxford professor, philosopher, and historian of ideas, the late Sir Isaiah Berlin (1909-97) was also one of the finest English essayists in the 20th century. This retrospective collection of 17 of his ... Lue koko arvostelu

Review: The Proper Study of Mankind

Käyttäjän arvio  - Chris - Goodreads

"The Concept of Scientific History"--Berlin brilliantly attacks the idea that history is among the social sciences. Braudel nods. "The Originality of Machiavelli"--great piece. "The Counter-Enlightenment"--will read soon. Lue koko arvostelu

Sisältö

The Pursuit of the Ideal
1
Philosophical Foundations
17
Freedom and Determinism
91
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Tietoja kirjailijasta (1997)

Philosopher, political theorist, and essayist, Isaiah Berlin was born in 1909 to Russian-speaking Jewish parents in Latvia. Reared in Latvia and later in Russia, Berlin developed a strong Russian-Jewish identity, having witnessed both the Social-Democratic and the Bolshevik Revolutions. At the age of 12, Berlin moved with his family to England, where he attended prep school and then St. Paul's. In 1928, he went up as a scholar to Corpus Christi College in Oxford. After an unsuccessful attempt at the Manchester Guardian, Berlin was offered a position as lecturer in philosophy at New College. Almost immediately, he was elected to a fellowship at All Souls. During this time at All Souls, Berlin wrote his brilliant biographical study of Marx, titled Karl Marx: His Life and Environment (1939), for the Home University Library. Berlin continued to teach through early World War II, and was then sent to New York by the Ministry of Information, and subsequently to the Foreign Office in Washington, D.C. It was during these years that he drafted several fine works regarding the changing political mood of the United States, collected in Washington Despatches 1941-1945 (1981). By the end of the war, Berlin had shifted his focus from philosophy to the history of ideas, and in 1950 he returned to All Souls. In 1957, he was elected to the Chichele Chair of Social and Political Theory, delivering his influential and best-known inaugural lecture, Two Concepts of Liberty. Some of his works include Liberty, The Soviet Mind: Russian Culture under Communism, Flourishing: Selected Letters 1928 - 1946, Political Ideas in the Romantic Age: Their Rise and Influence on Modern Thought, and Unfinished Dialogue, Prometheus. Berlin died in Oxford on November 5, 1997.

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