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do not think he will or can execute them on many accounts; and am of opinion he sent them to me on purpose that I should transmit them further: for which reason I did not and do not impart them. Were he and Filmore (Lord Mar) separated, I flatter myself I should dislodge these thoughts and bring him to reason. But as things stand now, I almost despair of seeing him; and till I do, think it will be better to say nothing of what has been written to me.

Nothing more need be said of Lord Bolingbroke, after I have sent you the copy of his petition, and you have observed from it in what a mean state of mind he is, and how low he has stooped to gain a very little point, not worth his while under any other view than that of its being sometime or other an inlet to greater; in which, however, he may be, and I hope will be, deceived; and then, I suppose, we shall hear of him again, if by that time there be any need of him.

DUKE OF WHARTON TO JAMES.

(Extract.)

May 29. 1725. Your Majesty may be assured that no step taken by the Ministers has done them more prejudice in the opinion of all mankind than the screening the Earl of Macclesfield; and all parties, especially the old Whigs, are enraged to the greatest degree. Your Majesty will likewise observe the behaviour of the Earl of Strafford on Lord Bolingbroke's Bill. I wish the conduct of another Lord upon that occasion could be mentioned without astonishment.

BISHOP ATTERBURY TO JAMES.

(Extract.)

(Paris) June 25. 1725. It is now put beyond all doubt that you have nothing to expect from hence while the strict friendship between England and France continues — and continue it will till matters are made up between Spain and France, of which there is not as yet, you find, Sir, any probability ; nor will it happen till the Emperor, whose influence governs all in Spain, has served his ends on France, whatever they are, by this alliance.

It is confessed by France that England is now its only ally, and consequently the alliance betwixt them must be now stricter than ever. And therefore there is nothing now to be managed with France beyond your private concerns which you have ordered to be solicited here, which may probably the rather succeed, because no applications of a more important kind will.

I have considered all the particulars mentioned in your letter, and obeyed all your commands as far as my sad state of health and the recluse solitary life I am obliged to lead have enabled me to do it. Had I more light into things, and more opportunity of gaining it, I might perhaps be somewhat more useful. As the case is with me, I do my best, and what is wanting in abilities endeavour to make out by my prayers for your prosperity and happiness.

DUKE OF WHARTON TO JAMES.

(Extract.)

Rotterdam, July 4. 1725. BEFORE I left London I communicated to Lord Orrery, Lord Strafford, Dr. Friend, Mr. Cæsar, and Major Smith, the reasons I had to believe that I should be employed abroad in your business, and took their advice as to many particulars relating to the execution of my enterprise. It is certain that, if possible, something should be attempted this summer during the Duke of Hanover's absence, and any foreign Prince who has the least inclination to serve your Majesty should upon this occasion lose no time. The Czarina might, if she would, send unto England and Scotland the fleet now ready to sail, and might surely do the work, for aught I know, without the least opposition ; and all resistance would be trifling, let the Whigs make the most of it !

DUKE OF WHARTON TO JAMES.

(Extract.)

Madrid, April 13. 1726. It would be taking too much of your time to mention the particulars which passed at each conference with Ripperda relating to the unfortunate separation in the Royal Family, which was the first and chief motive of Mr. Collins (the King's) sending Lock (Duke of Wharton) hither. Prior (Duke of Wharton) endeavoured to explain Loftus's (the King's) conduct in its true light. Bentley (Duke of Ripperda) approved of it extremely, and said that the giving a Protestant governor to the Prince of Wales was a prudent and a wise step. He agreed that the King could not, nor ought not, to part with Lord Inverness. But at the same time assured me that it was impossible to bring Kelly and Gibson (the King and Queen of Spain) to reason upon the subject ; for that they were, and the Duke of Ripperda feared would continue, implacable upon it. On Monday night the Duke of Ripperda acquainted the King and Queen of Spain that Lock (Duke of Wharton) was arrived, and had letters from his master for them; and the next day he told me that they had ordered him to receive the letters, and that perhaps they might answer them, but would not allow me the honour of waiting upon them. He said that the King of Spain thought the Queen should be satisfied in every point, and that Lord Inverness should be removed, and the seals given to me: to which I answered, that though I should always be proud of serving Collins (the King) in any station, yet I would never consent to accept of an employment from which I should be liable to be removed by the caprice of the Queen, or the malice of one of her maids : so I desired to hear no more upon that head. He then said, as from himself, that Garth (Duke of Ormond) ought to be made governor to the Prince, but I told him that it was impossible; and I believe Loftus (the King) will receive by this post Garth's (Duke of Ormond's) thoughts upon the subject.

I find Garth (Duke of Ormond) has been very active here; but I can say with great truth that nobody that has not been something conversant with this Court can imagine how impracticable it is to do business. The accounts the Duke of Ormond gave the King of this Court, and with which he was so kind as to honour me, are but too true.

DUKE OF WHARTON TO MR. HAY (LORD INVERNESS).

(Extract.)

Madrid, June 8. 1726. You see now that I am banished England, which is an obligation I owe to the Duke of Ripperda, and I declare that it is the greatest satisfaction to me that my precautions with bim were such that I am his only sacrifice. I hope the King will take my behaviour upon this affair as I meant it, which was to avoid any suspicions of lying under the least imputation of playing the second part of the Duke of Mar's tune. I had rather carry a musket in an odd-named Muscovite regiment, than wallow in riches by the favour of the usurper.

I wrote a letter to the King of Spain, and it was delivered to him this evening, but his Majesty making no answer to it, I set out infallibly on Tuesday next, and hope to be with you in three weeks, wind, weather, Moors, and Whigs permitting. I am told from good hands that I am to be intercepted by the enemy in my passage. I shall take the best precautions I can to obviate their malice.

I wish the King would recall his Irish subjects from this country, for they have really infected Kelly and Gibson (King and Queen of Spain).

BISHOP ATTERBURY TO JAMES.

(Extract.)

(Paris) Sept. 2. 1726. The strange turn taken by Offield (Duke of Wharton)* gave me such mortifying impressions, that I have foreborne for some posts to mention him at all ; and had not you in yours of August 14. spoken largely of his conduct, I should still have continued silent on that article: for, as I cannot any ways approve it, so neither do I care to speak of it as I ought, when it is to no purpose, and the matter is beyond all remedy.

You say, Sir, he advised but with few of his friends in this matter. I am of opinion he advised with none, nor do I hear of a single person concerned in the affair who could reasonably bear that name. Sure I am, whoever gave him such advice, if any body gave it, could not be his friend. It is easy to suppose you were both surprised and concerned at the account when it first reached Rome, since it is impossible you should not be so; the ill consequences are so many, so great, and so evident, I am not only afflicted but bewildered when I think of them. The mischief of one thing you mention, is, that he will scarce be believed in what he shall say on that occasion, so low will his credit have sunk, nor be able effectually to stop the mouth of malice by any after declarations. It is with pleasure however I read your account of Mercer's (the King's) last directions to him relating to Dexby, &c. (Flanders). They seem to me extremely just and proper

* His abjuration of the Protestant faith.

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