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and in those in which a Province shall be a party, the jurisdiction of the court shall be original and exclusive.

ARTICLE CII.

The trial of all ordinary crimes, except in cases of impeachments, shall be by jury, as soon as this institution is established in the Nation. Such trial shall be held in the Province where the offense was committed; but when the wrong was done outside the limits of the Nation, and in violation of international law, Congress shall decide, by a special law for that purpose made and enacted, what will be the place in which the trial shall be held.

ARTICLE CIII.

Treason against the Nation shall consist in taking up arms against it, or in joining its enemies and lending them aid and comfort. Congress shall, by a special law, fix the penalty for this crime; but the punishment shall not go beyond the person of the offender, nor shall any infamy resulting from the conviction and punishment of the latter attaint his relatives in whatever degree.

TITLE II.—PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS.

ARTICLE CIV.

The Provinces retain all the powers not delegated by the present Constitution to the Federal Government, as well as all the powers expressly reserved by them, through special agreements, at the time of their admission into the Union.

ARTICLE CV.

Each Province shall have its own local institutions and laws, and shall be governed by them. They elect their governors, legislators, and provincial functionaries of all classes, without intervention of the Federal Government.

ARTICLE CVI.

Each Province shall enact its own constitution, subject to the provisions of Article V.

ARTICLE CVII.

The Provinces shall have the power to conclude, with the knowledge of the Federal Congress, such partial treaties as may be necessary for the purposes of administration of justice, or for regulating financial interests, or undertaking

public works; and to promote, by means of protective laws and at their own expense, their own industries, immigration into their territories, the building of railroads and navigable canals, the settlement and colonization of the provincial lands, the introduction and establishment of new industries, the importation of foreign capital, and the exploration of their rivers.

ARTICLE CVIII.

The Provinces can not exercise any power delegated to the Nation. They can not, without authority from the Federal Congress, enter into any partial treaties of a political character, or pass laws relating to the domestic or foreign commerce or navigation, or establish provincial custom-houses, coin money, or create banks of emission. Neither can they enact any civil, commercial, criminal or mineral codes, subsequent to the promulgation of the national ones enacted by Congress, or pass laws especially applicable to themselves on the subjects of citizenship, naturalization, bankruptcies and counterfeiting of money or State bonds, or establish tonnage duties, arm war vessels, or raise armies, except in case of foreign invasion or of such imminent danger as to admit of no delay, and on condition that they give full and prompt account of it to the Federal Government, or appoint or receive foreign agents, or permit new religious orders to be admitted.

ARTICLE CIX.

Their complaints

No Province can declare or wage war against another. against each other must be submitted for decision to the Supreme Court of Justice. Actual hostilities on the part of one Province against another shall be deemed to be acts of civil war, seditious and riotous, which the Federal Government has the duty to put down and repress under the laws.

ARTICLE CX.

The governors of the Provinces shall be the natural agents of the Federal Government for the enforcement of the Constitution and the laws of the Nation.

Hall of Sessions of the National Convention at the City of Santa Fé, on the 25th day of September, 1860.

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Appendix B.

TARIFF OF THE ARGENTINE REPUBLIC, 1893.

The collection of duties in the Argentine Republic is based upon the official valuation of the various articles of merchandise fixed by the Executive and expressed in national gold currency or its equivalent in foreign current specie, although the duties may be paid in paper currency equivalent according to the rate established by the Treasury Department. The general rate of duty imposed is 25 per cent on the official valuation, but certain articles are taxed at the rates of 5, 40, 50, and 60 per cent on the same valuation. Articles not included in the tariff will pay duty according to the value declared in the invoice. Following are the principal equivalents appearing in the tariff:

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The present tariff, which went into effect January 1, 1893, was sanctioned by an act of the Argentine Congress December 30, 1892.* Its chief provisions are the following:

IMPORT TARIFF.

ART. 1. All goods imported from abroad for local consumption shall pay a duty of 25 per cent on the value in deposit, with the exception of the following articles, which shall pay as hereunder stated:

* This tariff has been modified by the removal of the duty on crude pretroleum from the United States. See p. 132.

+ This value is established by the administration according to a valuation table (de avaluos), which is published annually.

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59.

Same in bottles, not exceeding 68° centigrade, per bottle of from
0.501 liter to I liter..

.30

60.

Absinth, anise brandy, cognac, gin, kirsch, and other similar liquors
not exceeding 68° centigrade, in casks .....

...liter..

25

61.

62.

Absinth, anise brandy, cognac, gin, kirsch, and other similar liquors
not exceeding 68° centigrade, per bottle of from 0.501 liter to I liter..
Beer or cider, in casks....
...liter..

.30

IO

63.

64.

Beer or cider, in bottles....per bottle of from 0.501 liter to 1 liter ..
Liqueurs, sweet or bitter, not exceeding 68° centigrade, in casks or
demijohns

. 15

..liter..

.25

65.

Liqueurs, sweet or bitter, not exceeding 68° centigrade, in bottle,

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69.

Wine of all kinds, in bottles, per bottle of a capacity not exceeding
I liter......

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The alcohol, alcoholic beverages, or liqueurs enumerated in Nos. 58 to 61, 64, and 65, exceeding the alcoholic strength, respectively, designated as the maximum, shall pay a surtax of 0.003 peso for every degree or fraction of a degree in excess. Common wine, in casks, the alcoholic strength of which exceeds 46° centigrade, shall pay a surtax of .00 peso* per liter for every degree or fraction of a degree in excess.

.kilo..

71. Piping, of iron, neither tinned ("sin-baño") nor galvanized, more than

75 millimeters in diameter .

72. Piping, of iron, galvanized

73. Chocolate.....

74. Copper, in bars, ingots, or sheets..

08

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75. Preserves, of all kinds

*In rule 2, for the application of the ad valorem tariff, this surtax is inscribed as of 1 centavo per liter for every degree or fraction of a degree in excess.

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