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ples of

AMERICAN Lyceum,

504 , Hahn, Dr. his Disputation, &c. 191
Amusements, what to be avoided by

his Address,

209
young Christians.
356 | Hall Robert, Memoir of

437
Arian minister, confessions of 614 Hebrews, Episue to, when written, 633

Canonical author.
ity of

635
Barbauld, Mrs. account of

187

Paul, author of 640
Bayssiere Peter, Letter of 53 107 220 277 Hicks Elias, and his followers, princi-
Remarks on 279

433 503
Boston first Revival of religion in 611
Byron, reflections on his death, 393 Infants Damnation of, not a doctrine of

(alvinism,

42 78 162
Calvin, character of

330

Inferences from the discussion of Min-
Calvinistic Confessions not teach the

isterial Exchanges,

505
damnation of Infants,

79 Inspiration of sacred writers, by what
Calvinists charged with holding the

proved,

403
damnation of Infants,

mistakes to be avoided, and

43
Channing, Dr., his Pantheism,

668

cautions to be observed, 474 624
his Universalisin, 669
Introductory Article,

2
Charlton, Installation at
447 Italy, Reformation in

332 445
Christ-ians, their belief,

435
Christian Disciple,
614 Jesuits, account of

646
Christian Examiner, Lettters to the

Jesuits' principles exposed,

618
Editor of
42 78 149 Johnson Dr. death-bed of

212
Christian Spectator,

672
Churches À postolic Organization of
57 Kenrick, character of

592
Churches Congregational of Massa-

Kenrick's Exposition, remarks on 591
chusetts,
57 113 | Letter to the Editor,

514
distinct from Parishes,

60 Letter to the Rev. Parsons Cooke, re-
formed by Covenant,

63
marks on

670
general rights of
65 Letters of Canonicus, notice of

615
have chosen their Pastors, 66 Letters of an English Traveller on Re-
right to choose their Pastors, 68 vivals, who the author of

250
corporate bodies, 113 499

what the object of

258
right to hold property,

113

means of the author to obtain
Coleridge character of

538
his object,

310 374
Controversy reasons for

13

commended by Unitarians, 262
objections to

15
Cowper character of

363 Magazines Religious, in the U. States, 2
Creeds, their use,

272 Magazine Religious, reasons for one
Different Denominations of Christians, in Boston,

4
benefits of

348 Mather Cotton, a distributer of Tracts, 611
Dorchester,

558 | Ministeral Exchanges, Letter on 141
Education Christian,

Naturalism, cause of its spread in Ger-
561
many,

101
Enterprise Christian, Favorableness of

effects of it,

104
the present age for the success of 617
Evangelical Church Journal, (German)

Neologists, their system,

96

New England, moral importance of, to
prospectus of

29
the United States,

337
supporters of

31
Exchanges with Unitarian Ministers, 448 505

Orthodoxy defined,

11
arguments for them refuted,

458
Exchanges Ministerial, Letter on

Orthodox belief, superior moral influ-

141
Exposition of 1 Pet. iii. 8–20,

406
ence of

176
Mark, x. 14, 15. Mait. xviii. 3. 576

acknowledged by op-
posers,

178 586
John, i. 14-5.

657

Orthodoxy and Unitarianisın essential-
ly different,

285 450
Fellowship Christian, Principles of 451 Palestine, Map of

504
Fellowship with Unitarians, refusal of Panoplist, services of

3
no innovation,
284 Parish limits discussed,

172
France, Protestantism in 52 107 220 277 Payson's Sermons, character of 515

extracts from 516
Penitentiary System,

613
Tena, meaning of the word,
573 Pilgrim Faihers, character of

9
German Authors characterized, 165 Poslok Robert, Sketch of

536
Glasgow, result of Unitarian Contro- Pollok's Course of Time, character of 520
versy there,

269

extracts from 530
Good Dr. Life and Conversion of 596 Priestley, how estimated by Unitarians
Griesbach's Testimony to the Divinity in Boston,

157
of Christ,

71 580 Prussia King of, favorable to Religion, 28

191

498

one

Rationalism defined,

192 | Review of Mr. Whitman's Discourse
Religion, what it does not do, 37 74

on Regeneration, 409
what it accomplishes, 116

the Life of John Ledyard, 486
evidence of

147

Pollok's Course of T'ime, 516
Religious anxiety, properties of 481

Dr. Lowell's Sermon on
Revivals of Religion, Thoughts on, 37 74,

the Trinitarian Contro-
145 353 480

versy,

540
Benefits of 603

Works on the Geography
Means of promo-

of Palestine,

589
ting
605

Professor Stuart's Com-
objection to them

mentary on the Hebrews, 629
refuted, 397

Pascal's Provincial Letters, 6 16
Rights and duties of different denomi-
nations of Christians, 169 225 317

INDEX OF NOTICES.
Rights of the Churches Unitarian Expo-
Sition of, in 1806,

Notice of the Review of Mr. Whitman's
Rose's account of Neologism,

99

Discourse on denying the
Lord Jesus,

274
Scriptures, Inspiration of 402. 474. 62

More than Hundred
Semier, character and labors of 23. 33

Seriptural arguments, &c. 276
Sin Original, how held in New Eng-

Mr. Blagden's Address on
land,

157
Education,

319
Society, which shall you join?

231
Unitarian Advocate

324
Speeches of Judge Siory, remarks on 313

Dr. Gritin's Convention Ser-
Spirit of the Pilgrims,

500
mon,

389
Stuart Professor, Letter from

161

Dr. Channing's Sermon at
his Commentary,

560

the Installation of Mr.
Motte,

390
Unitarianism, its comforts in affliction, 185

Memoir of Herbert Marshall, 428

Mr. Knowles' Address on the
and Universalism, simi-
lar,
235 147
fourth of July,

429

Mr. Nelson's Ordination Ser-
essentially different from
Orthodoxy, 285 450

mon,

430
its difference admitted by

Mr. Bigelow's Ordination
Unitarians,

512
Sermon,

431

Mr. Damon's Farewell Ser-
Unitarians, refusal of their fellowship

281

mon,
no innovation,

431

Publications of the Friends
denied fellowship in the an-
cient churches

287

relative to the Hicksites, 433
their former concealment

Gospel Luminary,

435

Remains of Rev. Charles
denied, but proved, 325

Wolfe,

492
their misrepresentations de-
nied, but proved,

327

Mr. Cogswell's Sermon on
Unitarian Minister, testimony of

391
Religious Liberty,

493
Editor, testimony of

Mr. Beckwith's Sermon on
418

the mode of Baptism, 494
Ministers, why not exchange

419 505

Sabbath School Treasury,
with

495
Advocate,

559

Mr. Pierpont's Sermon on

615
Reformation, progress of

495
Christ's Intercession,
Mr. Noble on the Inspiration
of the Scriptures,

551
United States, relative importance of

Dr. Wainwright's Discourse,
to the world,

281
(African School)

553

Mr. Bacon's Discourse at the
Vanderkemp Dr., account of

612

funeral of Mr. Ashmun, 554
Dr. Humphrey's Address on
Intemperance,

555
Worcester Dr. N., his doctrine of Pro-

Christian Almanack, for 1829, 557
nouns examined,

305
Year, the close of

Mr. Smith's thoughts on Revi-
651
vals,

602

Mr. Foot's Discourse
INDEX OF REVIEWS.

False Teachers,

606
Review of the Evangelical Church

Professor Stuart's Hebrew
Journal,
20 191
Grammar,

607
Unitarian Tracts, Nos. 12

American Reader,

608
and 13,

181

Henry's Discourse on Meek-
Nos. 14 and 15, 300

ness,

608
Nos. 16 and 17, 579

Mr. Greenwood's Lives of
Letters of an English Tra-

the Apostles,

609
veller, &c. 248 310 374

Dr. Taylor's Discourse on
Dr. Beecher's Occasional

Depravity,

664
Sermons,

266

Mr. Stone's 'Dedication Ser-
Dr. Woods' Lectures on

mon,

666
Infant Baptism,

295

Dr. Channing's Ordination

Sermon,
Life and Writings of Wm.

666
362
Cowper, Esq.

670
The Day of Doom, &c.

on

THE

SPIRIT OF THE PILGRIMS.

VOL. I.

JANUARY, 1828.

NO. 1.

It has for some time past appeared exceedingly desirable, that there should be published in Boston a periodical work, in which that portion of the community, usually denominated orthodox, can easily and frequently express those views of truth and duty, which, after a full and fair examination, are judged to be of great importance. At present, although there are several respectable religious magazines in our country, none of them can be made to accomplish here, all the beneficial ends, which the interests of the church now require. After serious and prayerful deliberation, therefore, it has been determined to establish a new magazine. The determination was not made without duly weighing the responsibilities to be assumed; and, since made, it is regarded with much satisfaction by those who formed it, and by many others to whom it has been communicated.

Were there no experience on the subject, we might safely conclude, that a magazine, devoted to the defence of truth and the refutation of error;—to a free and candid discussion of those great topics, which are connected with the character and destiny of man as an accountable and immortal being ;—and to those objects of exparlsive benevolence, which distinguish the period in which we live, must be one of the most powerful and happy instruments that could be employed. A monthly publication, which can be preserved in the form of a book, and is sufficiently large to admit of extended discussion, combines as many advantages, perhaps, as are to be had in any use of the periodical press; especially as applied to grave and solemn subjects. While literature, science, and the arts, avail themselves, to a very great extent, of the facilities afforded by monthly magazines, it cannot be doubted that these publications are equally fit to promote useful investigation in morals and religion.

But we are not left to inferences, however certain they might appear. Taking a retrospect of what has been done, during the last thirty years, both in Great Britain and America, for the promotion of practical godliness, or of harmony and brotherly cooperation, JAN. 1828.

1

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or of Christian enterprise, -it is found, that almost every advance has been made, through the instrumentality of religious magazines. These have proved the most convenient and respectable vehicles of thought and communication, on all matters relating to the prosperity of religion; and without such vehicles of some kind, it would not be possible that ministers and churches should feel that strength, or derive that mutual support, or make those exertions for the common good and for the salvation of their fellow men, which are the result of free public discussion and united counsels.

There are many now living, who well remember the impulse, which was given to the more intelligent part of the Christian community, by the establishment of the Theological Magazine in New York, about the year 1796, or 1797, to which some of the first ministers in our country were contributors; particularly, that profound reasoner and able divine, Dr. Edwards, president of Union College, and son of the great president Edwards.

The Connecticut Evangelical Magazine was commenced not long afterwards; and was continued, with one short interval, for about fifteen years. During this period, it exerted a most salutary influence in many respects; but especially in exciting the proper spirit, and obtaining the necessary resources, for those evangelical operations, under the auspices of the Connecticut Missionary Society, by which churches were organized, revivals of religion experienced, and the regular preaching of the Gospel established, in very many new settlements, which would otherwise have remained a moral wilderness, with little prospect of being reclaimed for generations to come. And here it may be proper to say, in passing, that the trustees of that Society, a truly venerable succession of men, are entitled to rank high among those, who prepared the way for all the enterprises of Christian beneficence, in which our country now takes a part. No person, at the present day, entertains juster sentiments, than they uniformly felt and expressed, in regard to the duty of sending the Gospel to every part of our widely extending territory; and, during more than a third of a century, they have actually sent forth missionaries, beginning with four or five, and increasing to more than fifty, into the most remote and destitute settlements. This hasty tribute to their enlarged views, and faithful labors, we could not withhold.

Several other magazines, devoted to the same general objects, were published at different times in New York, Philadelphia, and other places. The design of this article does not require a particular enumeration of them.

The Panoplist, however, published in Boston from 1805 to 1820, in sixteen volumes, should not be omitted here. Besides exerting an important influence in the establishment and patronage of Bible, Missionary, Tract and Education Societies; besides furnishing a channel for the communication of thoughts on the

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