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riety of topicks in Life and Religion. Britain, and to the world. The Aucould not, from the nature of its thor was a witness of the system contents, be published with propriety described, and an agent under it. before his death ; but, that event Mr. MICHAEL FRYER, teacher of having now occurred, it is become the Mathematies, and secretary to desirable to publish together all that the Literary and Philosophical sowill ever appear of his Works. A ciety, Bristol, has issued Proposals Memoir of Mr. Cecil will be prefixed for publishing by Subscription, in to the First Volume ; and it is hoped Three volumes, 8vo. illustrated with the whole will be ready by Christmas. Copper-plales, a General History of

Mr. ALLNUTT, of Henley, is about the Mathematics, from the earliest to favour the publick witti a new and Ages, till the Close of the Eighteenth improved Edition of his useful and Century, extracted chiefly from Moncorrect Account of the Navigations of tucla, Kästner, Bailly, Bossut, and the Rivers and Canals West of London. others. Part 1. will contain « His

Notice of a splendid reprint of the tory of the Mathematics, from their first edition of WALTONS Complete Origin, till the Destruction of the Angler, was given in Vol. LXXX. p. Grecian Empire.” Part II. “ History 336, which is nearly ready for publi- of the Mathematics among the Eastcation. Mi. Bagster has taken off a ern Nations ; viz. the Arabs, the Perfew proofs from the Plates of Fishes, 8ians, the Jews, the Indians, and the which are engraved on silver ; and will Chinese.”. Part III.“ History of the present a set gratis to such purchasers Mathematics among the Latins, and of the QUARTO copies of the 7th edi- other Western Nations, until the Comtion as will take the trouble to send mencement of the 17th Century.” him their copies to have them inserted. Part IV. · History of the Mathe

We learn wilh satisfaction that the matics during the 17th Century." Dramatic Works of Honest Lillo, as Part V. “ History of the Mathemathe Reviewers emphatically styled tics during the 18th Century." him, which have long been extremely An improved edition for schools of scarce, and borne a very high price, the original text of Juvenal aud are now reprinting in a superior man PERSIUS, cleared of all the most exner, with additions; under the in- ceptionable passages, illustrated with spection of a gentleman well known explanatory Notes, and preliminary to the late Isaac Reed, and will be Essays, by the late EDWARD Owen, ready for publication in September. M.A. Rector of Warrington, is ex

Notices on the present Internal pected to be finished by Michaelmas. State of France, translated from the Messrs. Smith and Son of Glasgow, French of M. Faber, late a Public have in the press, a Catalogue, conOfficer in that country, are announced taining many works that will interest for publication. This work is said to the Bibliographer from their extreme be from the pen of one of the ablest rarity. The Black Letter, and early Political writers of the French Go- printed books, are most of thein in vernment, and contains an exposition tine condition. It will appear some of the highest importance to Great time in during the ensuing month.

INDEX INDICATORIUS. The MARGATE WAG, who had no better R. S. suggests as an inconsistency, that amusement on Sunday the 29th of July in Government Offices the Old Style is still than writing two letters (one of them in a adhered to, though it is now more than feigned name) may save himself any far. Half a Century since the general use of it ther trouble. He seems not to be aware was abolished by Authority. that the Post-office very honourably re The article sent by Dr. and Mr. CLARKE turns the Postage of such tricking letters; is a direct Advertisement; and, as such, or that such petty Frauds (for such they are) proper only for a Blue Cover. frequently lead to greater crimes.

Crito's kind letter is received. If “A constant Customer” could be Rev. R. FALCONER (Editor of STRABO) aware of the anxiety attendant on a period in our next; with “ Account of the Norical publication, combining multifarious thunberland Household Book,” by W.S.S.; objects, he would not be surprised at a “An Unconverted Jew, and Englishman;" postponement of the "accustomed inform “ R. ATKINS ;” “ CLERICUS SURRJENSIS ;" ation ;” printed now as a public record. “A Subscriber to the Clergy Orphan

AMATEUR'S “ Letter VI.” was printed in School;” P.“on the Established Church ;" our Supplement, vol. LXXX. p. 624. “ A Lover of Decency ;' &c. &c.

7. The Geographical, Natural, and Civil lent as even to excite the admiration

History of Chili. Translated from the of their enemies : and to this, in a original Italian of the Abbé Don 2, Igna- great measure, may be ascribed their tius Molina. To which are added, Notes successfully opposing, with far infefrom the Spanish and French Versions, and Two Appendixes, by the English foe."

rior arms, a powerful and disciplined Editor : the First, An Account of the Archipelago of Chitoe, from the Descrip

It is not yet determined to what tion Historical of P. F. Pedro Gonzalez particular cause the curious enquirer de Agueros ; the Second, An Account of may, venture to attribute the supethe Natire Tribes who bit the Southern riority of the Araucanians. The AuExtremity of South America ; extracted thor of the work inclines to suppose chiefly from Falkner's Description of them to be the descendants of some Patagonia : in Two Volumes, 8vo. Long- great and powerful natiou of foreign man and Co. 1809.

origin. The gentleman alluded io, A MAP of Chili faces the title- Don Juan Ignatius Molina, a native page; and we have two Prefaces, the of Chili, belonged to the order of Translator's, and Preface to the Na. Jesuits, and was celebrated for his tural History of Chili.

literary acquirements, his extensive The former states the opinion of knowledge in Natural History, and the Gentleman to whom the British his collections in that department of publick is indebted for the present science. When the Society to which publication (which accords precisely he belonged was dissolved," he shared with our own), that the History of the common fate of his brethren in the Spanish Settlements has at all pe- their banishment from the territories riods been interesting to the inhabil. of Spain. This misfortune was acants of Europe, and at no time more companied by another, perhaps full so than at this eventful era, when the as severe to the feelings of an accomstate of the Mother Couutry makes plished mind, the loss of his Collecit extremely probable they must be tions and MSS. “The most importseparated, to form another new em ant of the latter, relative to Chili, he pire in the West. The Translator had, however, the good fortune to, considers Chili, in many respects, as regain by accident some time after the most important of these settle- his residence in Bologna, in Italy, ments, particularly as the soil is fer- whither be had gone on his arrival in tile beyond example, the climate Europe." equally mild and salubrious, and pre The history of his native country, cious metals afford a constant source produced in consequence of the above of wealth. Nature, indeed, may be event, appeared at different periods : said to have lavished her best gifts the first part, containing the Natural on this favoured district of the globe. History, in 1787, and the second "In its minerals, ils plants, and its some years after. The original Itaanimals, the naturalist will find an lian work soon obtained great approinteresting and copious field of re bation on the European continent, search ; and the character of its na

where it has been translated into the tives furnishes a subject no less curi- German, Spanish, and French lanous and interesting to the moralist." guages. The celebrated Abbé Clavi.

It seems the Araucanian, who is gero, referring in a note in his Hisstyled "

“the proud and in vincible" by tory of Mexico to that of Chili, menthe Translator, exbibits traits of cha. tions the Author as his learned friend, racter peculiar to bimself, and scarcely and speaks of the work before us in to be paralleled by any nation in the terms of commendation. The Transold or new world. The arms of Spain, lator concludes bis Preface by sayiug: in the meridian of its mililary glory,

“In rendering this work into English, were directed in vain against these reference has been had both to the French brave people, who were a brilliant

and Spanish versions, which contain some

valuable additional notes. Through the example for the modern Spaniards in their resistance of oppression.

politeness of a gentleman of his acquaintAraucanians, it is true, to their high nished with an anonymous compendium

ance, the Translator has also been fur. sense of independence and unyielding of the History of Chili

, printed in Bologna courage, had the good fortune of in 1776, from which the supplementary ubiting a system of tactics so excel notes to this volume are taken." GENT. MAG. August, 1810.

" The

IA

In the Preface to the Natural His- country from the invasion of the tory of Chili, tbe Author declares that Spaniards to the present era ; and Olicountry may with great propriety be verez has been particularly successful compared to Italy, allowed on all in his collection of facts relative to sides to be the garden of Europe ; as the protracted resistance of the Arauit has still more considerable claims canians. The work of the Abbé Vito be considered the garden of South daurre is principally employed upon America. The climates are very the natural productions and customs similar; " and they are situated under of Chili, and displays much intelligence nearly similar parallels of latitude.” and acuteness of research.” The braThe resemblance still farther exists, very and perseverance of the people in the form of each being long in just samed, caused the writings of proportion to their breadth, and in four poems on that subject. the chains of mountains which divide Don J. Ignatius divides his History both. The Cordilleras, or the Andes, of Chili into four chapters: in the like the Apennines, are the sources first, he gives a succinct geographical whence alınost all the rivers are de account of the country, with the rived which fertilize the two coun state of the climate, seasons, wind, tries. These magnificent natural ele- meteors, volcanoes, and earthquakes. vations have a sensible influence on The remainder describe natural obthe salubrity of the climate in Italy jects, beginning with the most simple, and Chili; “ and so firmly are the and proceeding to the most complex; inhabitants (of the latter) convinced or, in other words, from the mineral of this fact, that whenever they at to the vegetable and animal kingtempt to account for any change in doms. And in the last the Author the state of the atmosphere, they at- introduces certain conjectures of his tribute it to the effect of these moun own, relating to the inhabitants of tains, which they consider as power Chili, and the mountaineers, as he ful and infallible agents.”. However considers the Patagonians and predesirable it has been to be well ac tended giants. He refers the various quainted with the peculiar advanta objects noticed to the genera of Linges of such a country, and its politi- næus, as far as he found it practicacal situation, the accounts which had ble; but, in some instances, finding previously appeared were extremely it difficult to reduce them to those superficial; and, of the natural pro- that are known, he had reeourse to his ductions, not more was known than own inventive faculties. The classificaof the language and customs of the tion of that celebrated Naturalist apinhabitants, or of “the exertions pearing incompatible with the plan of which the Chilians have made, even the work, he did not adopt it'; and, in our days, to defend their liberlies. though he followed his system, it Don J. Ignatius adınits that some valu

was not from a conviction of its suable, but very concise particulars, have periority to that of any other, but been given by Father Louis Feuillé, because it has been of late so genea French Minim Friar, of the plants rally adopted ;" for, great as the reand animals he observed upon the spect might be which he felt for so coast.” This, he adds, “is a work of learned a writer, Don J. could not great merit; the descriptions are pre "always approve of his nomenclature,” cise, and perfectly correct; but, as far preferring "the system of Walleit was published by the order and at rius and Bomare, in mineralogy, that the expence of the King, the copies of Tournefort in botany, and of Brisof it have become very scarce, and son in zoology,” as more simple and are in the possession of but few.” better known to the world in general.

Several Spavish Authors wrote on In his description of subjects in the subject of Chili, both in the last Natural History, the Author declined and present centuries : why they ne

the use of technical terins, to accomver published their labours, the Au- modate those not familiar with that thor promises to explain in the course study; at the same time, he introof his work. Don Pedro de Figueroa, duced the Linnæan characters, in La. and the Abbés Michael de Oliverez tin, of the known species, and his and Philip Vidaurre, are commended own discoveries, at the bottom of the for their various merits: the two first page. The following note belongs treat of the political history of the to this part of the Preface :

" that

" It has been thought advisable, In answer to the suggestions which in this version, to make some variation may occur on this head, he obseryes, in this respect; and, conformably thereto, all he has asserted relating to the the technical descriptions will be found country under notice is founded on at the end of the volume, arranged under personal experience and attentive ex. their respective heads." Amer. Trans.

amination during a residence of many. Don Ignatius professes to give his years, which assertions are confirmed descriptions in the most concise and by citations from respectable authors, satisfactory manner, so as to furnish "eye-witnesses, and not hear-say rę. the essential character of the species. laters, of what they have written." He has passed over, intentionally, the On the other hand, it appears that common characteristics of the genus ; M. de Pauw never visited the country and his readers will find, he observes, he has attempted to characterize ; nor «s that the same brevity, prevails has he, in the opinion of our Autbor, throughout the work, which is writ- been in the least solicitous “to conten in a plain and unaffected manner, sult those authors who have written without bewilderiny myself with vague upon it; for, although he frequently conjectures and hazardous hypothe- mentions Frazier and Ulloa, he cites ses, which would have been deviat, their opinions only as far as they ing altogether from the limits that I tend to confirm Bis theory." The had prescribed to myself.” We can writers just uamed speak of Chili as not resist the present opportunity of very fertile; but M. Pauw thought giving our assent to the method proper to omit that circumstauce, adopted by this enlightened writer, and declares in general terms, as we maintain with him that all il- wheat cannot be raised, except in lustrations of the sciences should be some of the North American progiven to the publick in terms equally vinces.” Molina viewed this objecplain and brief, without extraneous tionable publication rather as a romatter, calculated to raise doubts inance than a philosophical disquisirather than confirm truth. A mo- tion, as it appears plainly that the dest sincerity actuating this gentle. compiler has formed inferences from man, he quotes those Authors who

an ideal invention wholly his own. have written on Chili, to convince Ke found it sufficient for his purpose the world that he has not exagse- to select, in the vast exient of rated in his accounts of the salubrity America, soime unimportant division of the climate and the excellence of or island denied the advantages of a the soil, through partiality for his favourable climate and a ferlile soit. pative country, and to shew he might Thus provided, he did not scruple to have been justified in saying still attribute these defects to all the promore. The succeeding, paragraph vinces of the country; and his characcoufirms our good opinion of the ter of the Americans seems to have Author, and increases our reliance been derived from a wretched tribe of on what he has thought proper to the most obscure sa vages. Molina asadvance in the course of his volumes: serts, he should find it an almost end“ With respect to this work, it is rio less task to confute the erroneous more than a compendium, or an opinions this gentleman has dissemiabridged history of many of the na- nated respecting that portion of the tural productions of Chili. The re- world. “He has deduced his conclus fecting reader will not look in it for sions,” continues the Don, “ from a complete natural history of that the most unfounded premises, and country; such a work would have employed a mode of reasoning that required much greater means than I night with equal propriety be appossess, and such assistance as I have plied to the prejudice of any other not been able to procure.”

portion of the globe; a proceeding The Don thought it possible that that can be justified neither by rea. those who are acquainted with M. De nor philosophy. In short, De Pauw's philosophicalenquiriesrespect. Pauw has made use of as much free. ing the Americans, might be surprised dom with regard to America, as if to find remarks in the history of Chili he had been writing upon the moun not exactly corresponding with what and its inhabitants, But, to apprehas been advanced by that geutle- ciate properly the observations of man respecting America in general, this Author, I shall refer the reader

to

son

In the Preface to the Natural His- country from the invasion of the tory of Chili, tbe Author declares that Spaniards to the present era ; and Olicountry may with great propriety be verez has been particularly successful compared to Italy, allowed on all in his collection of facts relative to sides to be the garden of Europe ; as the protracicd resistance of the Arauit has still more considerable claims canians. The work of the Abbé Vi. to be considered the garden of Souih daurre is principally employed upon America. The climates are very the natural productions and customs similar ; " and they are situated under of Chili, and displays much intelligence nearly similar parallels of latitude." and acuteness of research.” The braThe resemblance still farther exists, very and perseverance of the people in the forni of each being long in just samed, caused the writings of proportion to their breadil, and in four poems on that subject. the chains of mountains which divide Don J. Ignatius divides his History both. The Cordiileras, or the indes, of Chili into four chapters: in the like the Apennines, are the sources first, he gives a succinct geographical whence almost all the rivers are de account of the country, with the rived which fertilize the two coun state of the climate, seasons, wind, tries. These magnificent natural ele- meteors, volcanoes, and earthquakes. vations have a sensible influence on The remainder describe natural obthe salubrity of the climate in Italy jects, beginning with the most simple, and Chili; “ and so firmly are the and proceeding to the most complex; inhabitants (of the latter) convinced or, in other words, from the mineral of this fact, that whenever they at- to the vegetable and animal kingtempt to account for any change in doms. And in the last the Author the state of the atmosphere, they at. introduces certain conjectures of his tribute it to the effect of these moun own, relating to the inhabitants of tains, which they consider as power Chili, and the mountaineers, as he ful and infallible agents.”. However considers the Patagonians and predesirable it has been to be well ac tended gian's. He refers the various quainted with the peculiar advanta- objects noticed to the genera of Linges of such a country, and its politi- næus, as far as he found it practicacal situation, the accounts which bad ble : but, in some instances, finding previously appeared were extremely it difficult to reduce them to those superficial; and, of the nalural pro that are known, he had recourse to his ductions, not more was known than own inventive faculties. The classifica. of the language and customs of the tion of that celebrated Naturalist apinhabitants, or of “the exertions pearing incompatible with the plan of which the Chilians have made, even the work, he did not adopt it'; and, in our days, to defend their liberliei. though he followed his system, it Don J. Ignatius ardınits that some valu was “not from a conviction of its suable, but very concise particulars, have periority to that of any other, but been given by Father Louis Feuillé,

because it has been of late so genea French Minim Friar, of the plants rally adopted ;" for, great as the reand animals he observed upon the spect might be which he felt for so coast." "This, he adds, “is a work of learned a writer, Don J. could not great merit; the descriptions are pre-"always approve of his nomenclature," cise, and perfectly correct; bui, as far preferring; "the system of Walleit was published by the order and at rius and Bomare, in mineralogy, that the expence of the King, the copies of Tournefort in botany, and of Bris. of it have become very scarce, and son in zoology," as more simple and are in the possession of but few.” better knowu to the world in general.

Several Spanish Authors wrote on In his description of subjects in the subject of Chili, both in the last Natural History, the Author declined and present centuries : why they ne the use of technical terins, to accomver published their labours, the Au modate those pot familiar with that thor promises to explain in the course study; at the same time, he introof his work. Don Pedro de Figueroa, duced the Linnæan characters, in Laand the Abbés Michael de Oliverez tin, of the known species, and his and Philip Vidaurre, are commended own discoveries, at the bottoin of the for their various merits: the two first page. The following note belongs treat of the political history of the to this part of the Preface :

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