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Whilst all the helpless poor shall him Their just protector find. . . 3 Then § and mountains shall bring forth The happy fruits of peace; Which all the land shall own to be The work of righteousness: 4 Whilst he the poor and needy race Shall rule with gentle sway; And from their humble necks shall take Oppressive yokes away. ; In ev'ry heart thy awful fear Shall then be rooted fast, \s long assum and moon endure, Or time itself shall last. ; He shall descend like rain, that cheers The meadow's second birth; Jr. like warm show’rs, whose gentle drops Resresh the thirsty earth. In his blest days the just and good Shall be with favour crown'd; "he happy land shall ev'ry where With endless peace abound. His uncontroll'd dominion shall From sea to sea extend; jegin at proud Euphrates’ streams, At nature's limits end. 'To him the savage nations round 'Shall bow their servile heads; lis vanquish’d foes shall lick the dust, Where he his conquest spreads. ) The king of Tarshish, and the isles, 'Shall costly presents .# ; rom spicy Sheba gifts shall come, And wealthy Saba’s king. | To him shall ev'ry king on earth His humble homage pay; nq differing nations gladly join To own his righteous sway. * For he shall set the needy free, When they for succour cry; hall save the helpless and the poor, And all their wants supply. s PART II. ; His providence for needy souls Shais due supplies prepare; nd over their defenceless lives Shall watch with tender care. He shall preserve and keep their souls From fraud and rapime free; ld, in his sight, their guiltless blood Of mighty price shall be. Therefore shall God his life and reign To unany years extend; hilst eastern princes tribute pay, And golden presents send. »r him shall constant prayers be made, Through all his prosp’rous days; s just dominion shall afford A lasting theme of praise. Of useful grain, through all the land, Coreat plenty shall appear;

A handful, sown on mountains-top, A mighty crop shall bear: Its fruits, like cedars shook by winds," A rattling noise shall yield; The city too shall thrive, and vie For plenty with the field. 17. The mem’ry of his glorious name Through endless years shall run; His spotless fame shall shime as bright And lasting as the sun. In him the mations of the world Shall be completely bless'd, And his unbounded happiness By ev’ry tongue confess'd. 18 Then bless'd be God, the mighty Lord, The God whom Israel fears; Who only wondrous in his works, Beyond compare appears. 19 Let earth be with his glory fill'd; For ever bless his name; Whilst to his praise the list'ning world Their glad assent proclaim. PSALM LXXIII. A". length, by certain proofs, 'tis plain That God will to his saints be find; That all whose hearts are pure and clean Shall his protecting favour find. 2, 3 Till this sustaining truth I knew, My stagg’ring feet had almost fail'd; I griev'd the sinners' wealth to view And envy’d when the fools prevail'd. 4, 5 They to the grave in peace descend, And, whilst they live, are hale and strong; No plagues or troubles them offend, Which oft to other men belong. 6, 7 wo pride, as with a chain, they're eld, And rapine seems their robe of state; Their eyes stand out, with satress swell'd ; They grow, beyond their wishes, great. 8, 9 With hearts corrupt, and lofty talk, Oppressive methods they defend; Their tongue through all the earth does walk; Their blasphemies to heav'n ascend. 10 And yct admiring crowds are found, Who servile visits duiy ina...e : Because with roenty trew aboond, Of which their tattoring slaves partake. 11 Their fond opinions these pursue, Till they with them profanely cry, ‘How should the Lord curactions vićw 2 Cam he perceive who dwells so high?’ 12 Behold the wicked these are they Who openly their sins profess: And yet their wealth’s il.creas'd each day, And all their actions meet success.

12, 14 “Then have I cleans'd my heart.' said I, “And wash'd my hands from guilt in vain * If all the day oppress'd I lie, “And ev'ry morning suffer pain.” 15 Thus did I once to speak intend; But, if such things I rashly say Thy children. Lord. I must offend, And basely should their cause betray. PART II. 16, 17 To fathom this, my thoughts I bent, But found the case too hard for me; Till to the house of God I went; Then I their end did plainly see. 18 How high soe'er advanc'd, they all On slipp’ry places loosely stand; Thence into ruin headlong fall, Cast down by thy avenging hand. 19, 20 Hic w dreadful and how quick their fate! Despisod by thee, when they're destroy'd; .As waking men with scorn do treat The fancies that their dreams employ'd. 21, 22 Thus was my heart with grief opprest, My reins were rack'd with restless pains; So stupid was I, like abeast, Who no reflecting thought retains. 23, 24 § still thy presence me supply'd, And thyright hand assistance gave; Thou first shalt with thy counsel guide, And then to glory me receive. 25 Whom them in heav'n, but thee alone, Have I, whose favours I require? Throughout the spacious earth there's none That I besides thee can desire. 26 My trembling flesh, and aching heart, May often fail to succour me; But God shall inward strength impart, And my etermal portion be. 27. For they that far from thee remove, Shall into sudden ruin fall; If after other gods they rove, Thy vengeanceshalldestroy them all. 38. But as for me,’tis good and just That I should still to God repair; In him I always put my trust, And will his wondrous works declare. PSALM LXXIV. Hy hast thou casio off, O God? Will thou no more return? 0', why against thy chosen flock Poes thy fierce anger burn? **śthy ancient purchase, Lord,

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7 By thee the borders of the earth In perfect orderstand;

The summer's warmth, and winter's cold, Attend on thy command.

PART III.

8 Remember, Lord, how scornful foes Have daily urg'd our shame; And how the foolish people have Blasphem'd thy holy name. 9 O! free thymourning turtle-dove, By sinful crowds beset; Northe assembly of thy poor For evermore forget. 0 Thy ancient cov'nant, Lord, regard, And make thy promise good; For now each cormer of the land Is fill’d with men of blood. 1 O! let not the oppress'd return With sorrow cloth'd, and shame; 3utlet the helpless and the poor . For ever praise thy name. !2 Arise, O God, in our behalf; Thy cause and ours maintain; Remember how insulting fools Each day thy mame profane. 23 Make thou the boasting of thy foes For evermore to cease; Whose insolence, if unchastis'd, Willmore and more increase.

PSALM LXXV.

Othee, O God, we render praise, To thee, with thanks repair; For, that thy name tousis migh, Thy wondrous works declare. 2 In Israel when my throne is fix’d, With me shall justice reign: 3 The land with discord shakes; but I The sinking frame sustain. 4 Deluded wretches I advis'd Their errors to redress; And warn’d bold sinners, that they should Their swelling pride suppress. 5 Bear not yourselves so high, as if No pow'r could your's restrain; Submit your stubborn necks, and learn To with less disdain: S For that promotion, which to gain Your vain ambition strives, From neither east nor west, nor yet From southern climes arrives. 7 For God the great disposer is, And sov’reign Judge alone, Who casts the proud to earth, and lifts, The humble to a throne. B His hand holds forth a dreadful cup; With purple wine 'tis crown'd; The deadly mixture which his wrath Deals out to mations round. Of this his saints sometimes may taste; JBut wicked men shall squeeze

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IS Judah the Almighty's known, Almighty there by wonders shown; His mame in Jacob does excel: 2 IIis sanctu’ry in Salem stands; The Majesty that heaven commands, In Sion condescends to dwell. 3 He brake the bow and arrows there, The shield, and temper'd sword, and spear; There slain the mighty army lay: 4 Whence Sion's fame through earth is read, Of greater glory, greater dread, Than hills where robbers lodge their prey. 5 Their valiant chiefs, who came for spoil them: met there a shameful foil: Securely down to sleep they lay; But wak’d no more, their stoutest band Ne'er lifted one resisting hand

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All night my fest'ring wound did run; No medicine gave relief: !y soul no comfort would admit; My soul indulg’d her grief. 3 I thought on God, and favours past; But that increas' liny pain: I found my spirit more oppress'd, The more I did complain. 4 Through every watch of tedious night Thou keep'st my eyes awake: My grief is swell'd to that excess, I sigh, but cannot speak. 5 I calid to mind the days of old, With signal mercy crown'd; Tizose famous years of ancient times, loor miracles renown'd. 6 By might I recollect my songs, On former triumphs made ; Then search, consult, and ask my heart, Where's now that wondrous aid 2 7 IHas God for ever cast us ass? Withdrawn his favours quite? 8 Are both his mercy and his truth Retired to endless might? 9 Can his long practised love forget Its wonted aids to bring? Has he in wrath shut up and seal’d Ilis mercy's healing spring 2 10 I said, my weakness hints these fears; But I’ll my fears disband; I'll yet remember the Most High, And years of his right hand. 11 I'll call to mind his works of old, The wonders of his might; 12 On them my heart shall meditate, My tongue shall them recite. 13 safood from human search on high, O God, toy counsels are: Who is so great a God as ours? Who can with him compare? 14 Long since a God of wonders thee Thy rescu'd people found; 15 Long since hast thou thy chosen seed With strong deliverance crown'd. 16 When thee, O God, the waters saw, The frighted billows shrunk; The troubled depths themselves for fear Beneath their channols sunk. 17 The clouds pour’d down, while rending skies Did with their noiro conspire; Thy arrows all abroad were sent, Wing'd with avenging fire. 13 IIeaven with thy thunder's voice was tol Whilst all the lower world With lightnings blaz'd, earth shook, and seem’d From her foundations hurl’d.

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Ho. O my people, to my law devout attention lend; Let the instruction of my mouth Deep in your hearts descend. 2 My tongue, by inspiration taught, Shall parables unfold, Dark oracles, but understood, And own'd for truths of old: 3 Which we from sacred registers Of ancient times have known, And our forefathers’ pious care To us has handed down. 4 We will not hide them from our of Our offspring shall be taught The praises of the Lord, whose Has works of wonderwrought 5 For Jacob he this law ordain'd, This league with Israel made; With charge to be from age to ago, From race to race, convey'd. 6 That generations yet to come Should to their unborn heirs Religiously transmit the same, And they again to theirs. 7 To teach them that in God alone Their hope securely stands; . . | That they should ne'er his works so fathers, they might |

But keep his just commands. 8 Lest, like their prove A stiff rebellious race, False-hearted, fickle to their God, Unsteadfast in his grace. 9 Such were revolting Ephraim's so Who, though to warfare bred, And skilful archers, arm'd with bows, From field ignobly fled. 10, 11 They falsified their God, His orders disobey'd, Forgot his work and miracles Before their eyes display’d. 12 Nor wonders, which their fishes saw, Did they in mind retain, | Prodigious things in Egypt dome, And Zoan's sertile plain. 13 He cut the seas to let them pass, Restrain'd the pressing flood; While piled on heaps, on either side The solid waters stood. 14 A wondrous pillar led them on, Compos'd of shade and . A sheltering cloud o: ‘by day, A leading fire by night,

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15 When drought oppress'd where no stream The wilderness supply'd, He cleft the rock, whose flinty breast Dissolv’d into a tide. 16 Streams from the solid rock he brought, Which down in rivers fell, That, oiling with their camp, each ay enew'd the miracle. 17 Yet there they sinn'd against him more, Provoking the Most High, In that same desert where he did Their fainting souls supply. 18 They first incens'd him; in their hearts, That did his power distrust, And long'd for meat, not urg’d by want, But to indulge their lust. 19 Them utter'd their blaspheming doubts; ... “Can God, say they, ‘prepare * A table in the wilderness, ` “Set out with various fare? 20 * He smote the flinty rock, 'tis true, • And gushing streams ensu'd; * But can he corn and flesh provide " * For such a multitude?” 21 The Lord with indigmation heard: From heaven avenging slame On Jacob fell, consuming wrath * On thankless Israel came: 22 Because their unbelieving hearts : In God would not conside, Mor trust his care, who had from hea; ven * Their wants so oft supply'd; 23 Though he had made his clouds dis- charge . Provisions down in showers; And when earth fail'd, reliev'd their : needs From his celestial stores; 24 Though tasteful manna was rain’d down, Their hunger to relieve; Thoughoon the stores of heaven they l ; Sustaining corn receive. 25 Thus man with angels' sacred food, Ungrateful man was fed; Not sparingly, for still they found A plenteóus table spread. 26 From heaven he made an east wind - blow, : Then did the south command 127 To rain down flesh like dust, and - fowls Like sea's unnumber'd sand. 28 Within their trenches he let fall The luscious easy prey;”

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And all around their spreading camp The ready booty lay. 29 They fed, were fill'd; he gave them leave Their appetites to feast; 30, $1 Yet still their wanton lust crav'd On, Nor with their hunger ceas'd. But whilst in their luxurious mouths They did their danties chew, The wrath of God smote down their chiefs, And Israel's chosen slew.

PART II.

32 Yet still they sinn'd, nor would af. ford His miracles belies: 33 Therefore through fruitless travels he Consum'd their lives in grief. : 34 When some were slain, the rest returm'd To God with early cry;” 35 Own'd him the Rock of their fence, Their Saviour, God most high. 36 But this was feign'd submission all; Their heart their tongue bely’d; 37 Their heart was still perverse, nor would Firm in his league abide. 88 Yet, full of mercy, he forgave, Nor did with death chastise; But turn’d his kindled wrath aside, Or would not let it rise. 39 For he remember'd they were flesh, That could not long remain; A murm'ring wind, that's quickly past, . And ne'er returns again. - 40 How oft did they provoke him there, How oft his patience grieve, In that same desert where he did Their fainting souls relieve! 41 They tempted him by turning back, And wickedly repin'd, When Israel's God refused to be By their desires confined. 42 Nor call'd to mind the hand and day That their redemption brought; 4S His signs in Egypt, wondrous works In Zoan's valley wrought. 44 He turn'd their rivers into blood, That man and beast forbore And rather choose to die of thirst, Than drink the putrid gore. 45 He sent devouring swarms of flies; Hoarse frogs annoy'd their soil; 46 Locusts and caterpillars reap'd The harvest of their toil. 47 Their vines with battering hail were broke; With frost the fig-tree dies; 34*

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