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than those which spring from an irregular and unauthorized mode of dealing with the case. I am, thertore, disinclined to advise any further measures to equip the vessel from here without formal instructions from the proper department of the government. I hope, therefore, that the Navy Department will prepare the necessary steps to assume this charge, in case Admiral Goldsborough, who is now believed to be in the Mediterranean, should find himself unable to do 30. Of his decision you will probably receive intelligence very soon, either from Mr. Dudley or myself. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

AIr. Seward to Mr. Adams." No. 1628.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, December 16, 1865. Sir: I have received your despatch of December 1st, No. 1101. I thank you for your attention in giving to me the information therein contained. There is a soreness in several of the lately disloyal States in the relations which exist between the whites and the blacks; a necessary consequence, perhaps, of past events. For this reason, the municipal authorities there need the support of a small military national force. The presence, however, of that very inconsiderable force is equally acceptable to the whites and to the blacks; it meets nowhere an enemy of the United States.

In no case in the world's history has treason been so effectually suppressed and extirpated. Neither Great Britain nor France, nor both combined, if disposed to engage in war with the

United States, as we trust indeed they are not, sould now find an ally here. If emissaries of the late rebellion, who are yet lingering in Europe, succeed in practicing upon the credulity of politicians there, it is a pitiable fruit of the original error of European sympathies with our domestic enemies. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS, Esq., 80., 80., 8c.

Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams.

No. 1630.)

DePARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, December 18, 1865. SIR: I have received your despatch of the 1st of December, No. 1099, enclosing copies of the London Times of the 30th ultimo and 1st instant, containing a report of the proceedings before the court of Queen's bench in the case of Captain Corbett, charged with a violation of the foreign enlistment act.

The actual result of this case excites no surprise here. Of complaints of the character above named there have, perhaps, been enough at present. But should you think otherwise, you are at liberty to make the proper representations to this department. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS, &c., fr., &c.

Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward.

No. 1111.)

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, December 21, 1865. Sir: I have to acknowledge the reception of despatches from the department numbered from 1611 to 1615, inclusive, and likewise two printed copies of the military order of the 24th of November, 1865, in relation to the rewards offered for the arrest of certain persons.

The same steamer which brought these despatches furnished to the public copies of the President's annual message, of the report of the Secretary of the Treasury, and of other papers, emanating from the executive department. The general effect produced by these publications has been most favorable. There is but one voice in regard to the dignity and comprehensiveness of the message. The effect of the treasury report has been felt in a sudden rise in the value of the government bonds, both in Germany and in this country. All this is a source of much exultation to those of us who have had the fortune to represent the country among the malevolent classes abroad, independently of the purer gratification we derive from a confirmation of our trust in the patriotic and wise direction of affairs through which we may soon hope for a re-establishment of the nation on a footing even more elevated than it has reached at any former time.

Although, perhaps, it may be deemed a work of supererogation, I cannot withhold the expression of my own hearty concurrence in the views taken by the President, not less of the financial and constitutional than of the diplomatic questions, which it has been his duty at this critical moment to present to the country. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS. Hon. William H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward.

No. 1112.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, December 21, 1865. Sir: On the receipt of your No. 1612, of the 30th of November, I solicited an interview with Lord Clarendon, which he accorded to me yesterday afternoon.

I told him that my object was simply to furnish him with the reply of my government to the note which he had addressed to me on the 11th of November in regard to the delivery of the Shenandoah, and the disposal made of the crew. I recalled to his mind the brief terms in which I had acknowledged it, and my expression of a disinclination to add a word of my own to aggravate the feeling which I foresaw it would occasion. I had now received a despatch from Washington, written after an examination of the papers which I was directed to submit to him. With his consent, I proceeded to read the contents of the paper. Referring to the last clause in it, I concluded by offering to leave a copy of it.

His lordship accepted the copy, at the same time manifesting a little emotion. He only added that he should prefer not to say a word about it on the moment, but rather to reserve his observations upon it until he could commit them to writing. I replied that this was the course which I had presumed he would take.

A little desultory conversation followed. The views heretofore respectively

taken of the two sides of the general question in dispute between us were reiterated with little variation, but all in good temper, after which I took my leave. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

No. 1115.]

Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward.
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, December 21, 1865. SIR: I have received from Mr. Graham, the consul of the United States at Capetown, a letter dated the 13th November, reporting a proposal made to him by her Majesty's naval commander at Simon's Bay to deliver to him the Tuscaloosa, which has been lying there so long. I presume that Mr. Graham has already reported the facts directly to the department. Hence it will be only necessary for me to say that in answer to his application to me for instructions, I replied by approving the course he had taken in agreeing to take the vessel, on behalf of the government, for the private owners, with an express reservation of all claims on the British government for damages of any kind by reason of the capture and long detention. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS. Hon. William H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

Mr. Seward to Mr. Adams. No. 1638.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, December 28, 1865. SIR: I enclose to you a translation of a communication of the 11th of November, addressed by Mr. S. Salnave, chief of the revolutionists in Hayti, to the Hon. Salmon P. Chase, Chief Justice of the United States, for the consideration of this government, from which it appears that with a view to the overthrow of the revolutionary party on that island, President Geffrard has, in order to obtain the co-operation of certain British naval vessels there, made proposals to cede portions of that territory to the British government.

It is suggested that to counteract numerous designs prejudicial to general peace, her Britaunic Majesty's government would cheerfully give assurances that they do not intend or expect to acquire territory in Hayti. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. Charles FRANCIS ADAMS, Esq., fr., 8., $c.

Mr. Salnate to Chief Justice Chase.
[Translation. ]

Monte CHRISTO, November 11, 1865. SIR : The undersigned has the honor to address to you this note to call your attention to & question of justice and of progress which cannot fail to interest you.

We bave directed at the city of the Cape (Hayti) a liberal revolution, having only for its objeet the overthrow of the despotism of Mr. Geffrard and to establish in its place the democratic institutions which constitute the honor and power of the United States.

The revolution has resisted for six months all the efforts of the tyrant, and we were on the point of overthrowing him when he had recourse to English intervention.

He pushed, by means unknown, the captain of the British war steamer Bulldog into seeking a quarrel with us, without a plausible motive, and in consequence to bombard our city. Seeing that we held out after this bombardment, he caused two other Euglish vessels of war to come from Kingston--the Galope and the Lily. These two vessels presented themselves at the cape, with Mr. St. John, chargé d'affaires of the British government, and without choosing to listen to a single justification on our part, or to accept any reparation for what they called an affront to their flag, they demanded a dishonoring action—that of going on board their vessels to be deported, and upon our refusal to abase ourselves, bombarded all our fortifications, and thus favored the entrance of the army of Geffrard within our walls. It need not be told that if the English could, in contempt of the law of nations, intervene by force of arms with the policy of our country, to destroy a revolution which was to give to Mayti lib. erty and prosperity, it is because Geffrard has made them promises about certain portions of the territory of our island. Such an engagement would be disastrous to the country, and would break up the American policy of our country, as it has established the Monroe system, which extends over all the American nations.

We feel ourselves able to recommence the revolution, and end it in less than a month, if we obtain from the government at Washington the succor we need in arms, powder, and other munitions of war. We have in the country profound sympathies. Our cause is that of lib. erty and progress. If your government chooses to sustain us, we will make it triumphant for the happiness of our country and the extension of friendly relations with the great American republic. To obtain this aid, we offer to 'guarantee to the Cabinet of Washington the port of Mole St. Nicolas as a maritime station. It is not the policy of the United States to establish colonies, but a maritime arsenal in a central position on the ocean cannot but be of great importance to them. Without detaching the city of Mole St. Nicolas from the indivisible body of the Haytian nationality, we would come under obligation to establish a maritime station and arsenal for the government of the United States of America, to which we would bind us more strictly still by a treaty of friendship and commerce.

We would be very glad to receive your answer in this respect, if the proposal attracts your attention. Presented by a man of your importance to the Cabinet of Washington, it cannot fail of success. At all events, we ask of you profound secresy on this overture. If Geffrard should get the least news of it, he would not neglect to invite the English to the point in question. We hold out at Monte Christo, on Dominican territory, wuiting the honor of a reply, which we beg you to make as soon as possible. Meantime we.pray you to accept the assurances of our most distinguished consideration.

S. SALNAVE. Hon. SALMON P. CHASE,

Chief Justice of the United States.

Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward. No. 1117.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, December 28, 1865. Sir: I have to acknowledge the reception of despatches from the department, numbered from 1616 to 1624, inclusive; also three printed copies of the President's order of the 1st of December, restoring the writ of habeas corpus, and several pamphlet copies of his annual message.

I have already taken action in regard to the matters contained in Nos. 1616 and 1623, but shall postpone making a special report on them until I receive the customary replies from the foreign office.

With regard to the directions contained in No. 1621, I find by a report from Mr. West, the consul at Dublin, dated the 25th of November, that, owing to his representations, Captain Fanning had been released from arrest previous to that date; hence there seems to be no necessity for making representations to this government, as suggested in your despatch. I shall, however, make new inquiries of Mr. West, to ascertain whether there be any further cause of complaint on the part of Captain Fanning, and regulate my action accordingly.

There has been some difficulty in distinguishing between the persons who have come to Ireland from America during the present difficulties with regard to the purposes of their visit. That many of them are more or less connected with the Fenian organization it is impossible to deny. The harder task is to define

those who are not. I have endeavored so to advise the consuls as to secure a proper share of protection for innocent persons, who are citizens of the United States, without attempting to interfere on behalf of those who have justly subjected themselves to suspicion of complicity with treasonable projects.

It is probable that you are kept so fully advised of these proceedings by the consuls there that I think it superfluous to dwell pon

them further. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward.

No. 1118.)

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, December 28, 1865. Sir: I have received an answer from Admiral Goldsborough to my application to him to know whether he could take charge of the Shenandoah. He appears unwilling to assume that responsibility, unless I expressly desire him to do so; and in case he did, he thinks it likely, from the report he has already made to the Navy Department on the subject, that his arrangements might clash with those which may already have been matured at Washington.

Under these circumstances I have directed the consul at Liverpool, Mr. Dudley, to lay up the vessel at that place until further orders from the proper authorities of the government. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS. Hon. William H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, DC.

Mr. Adams to Mr. Seward.

No. 1119.)

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, December 28, 1865. SIR: I bave the honor to transmit a copy of the supplement to the London Gazette, of the 22d instant, which contains the remainder of the correspondence between the foreign secretary and myself on the controverted question now pending between the two nations. It has naturally given occasion to less of commentary in the public press than the earlier portion, which really embraced all the elements for a judgment. The only leader which seems to deserve your attention is that contained in the Times of the 25th instant, a copy of which I transmit. You will perceive in it a renewal of the suggestion of a commission which may or may not have its origin in higher quarters. I am well convinced that the present position of the government is not regarded as at all satisfactory. Vague intimations have reached me of some intention to bring the subject formally before Parliament at an early period of the session. While I place no dependence upon these, I think it my duty to mention the fact as more or less indicative of the state of opinion here. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

CÉARLES FRANCIS ADAMS. Hon. William H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

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