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however, was still kept before the the speech of lord Liverpool delieye of both Houses by petitions -vered the year before, and chafrom different districts and bodies racterized the imputation of divided in Ireland, particularly those pre- allegiance as “a false pretence,” sented to the House of Peers, by because the Catholics in all their pelords Darnley and Grey, and the tions declared, that, in the oaths marquis of Lansdown, and to the which they took, and were ready Commons by sir Francis Burdett, to take, they swore allegiance to and Mr. Brougham. The peti- his majesty alone. Lord Liverpool tions were more especially directed answered, that although he never to a disclaimer of the imputation doubted the sincerity of the Caof owing a divided allegiance; tholies in disclaiming civil alleevidently

on account of the weight giance to any foreign power, the which the argument of the Anti- fact could not affect the argument; Catholics on this point had carried for his argument was that spiritual with it, or had seemed to carry subjection to a foreign power was with it, in the debate of the pre- inconsistent with civil obedience ceding session. Lord Darnley, in to our own sovereign. fact, in presenting a petition from At the same time, a sort of Drogheda, proceeded to answer schism threatened to take place of his learning, and the suavity of his established church [loud cheers]. we between the Catholics and the the Dissenters might have an Dissenters. It appeared to the swered, without being thought to former, that the Dissenters, from violate sound reasoning, that, ale whom as also labouring under though Dissenters, they were political disqualifications they na- Protestants; that apprehensions of turally looked for sympathy and the influence of foreign spiritual support, had either openly join- supremacy, the conviction of the ed the body of their opponents, or degrading and debasing effects of had manifested only a cold and the Catholic superstition in all the discouraging neutrality, not re- relations of life, and the reasonable flecting, that the liniment applied dread that all its powerful control annually, in the shape of an In- over the minds of its adherents demnity bill, to the sores of the must be, and would be, directed to Dissenters, prevented that constant the overthrow of the Protestant irritation which kept the wounds religion, and of the form of goof the Catholics perpetually green, vernment that gave supremacy to especially under the care of such protestantism that all these causes rash, and ignorant, and interested, of opposition, whether wellfounded practitioners as the associated or not, were common to all Protesagitators; and that it is never easy tants; and that no inconsistency to rouse men to battle for an ab- could exist in the union of a church stract principle, where no practical man and a dissenter to repel a inconvenience is felt, or supposed common danger. to be felt, from its non-assertion. While the claims of the Catho. Lord Darnley complained bitterly lics were merely the subject of of their inconsistency in pressing incidental remarks, the condition the abolition of negro slavery, and of the Protestant church in Ireresisting the abolition of Catholic land, the discharge of its duties, disabilities. They form,” said and the management of its funds, his lordship, " a powerful and nu- were frequently made the subjects merous sect in this country, and of more direct discussion. are undoubtedly respectable and In the House of Lords, lorde well-meaning: yet, while they Kingston moved for the appointwere urging the government and ment of a committee to inquire parliament to precipitate the eman- into the state of the Protestant cipation of the negroes, they were church in the province of Munster. busily engaged last year, in most He founded his motion upon the unnatural connection with the evils which he stated to have High Church party, in induc- arisen from the union of livings, ing their lordships to reject the and the consequent want of churches prayer of the Catholics of Ireland. to which the Protestant people In one breath, these persons called might repair. In the province in upon parliament to precipitate a question his lordship stated, it had measure, the precipitation of which not been uncommon to unite five, it was by no means impossible six, or seven livings in one person ; might compromise the safety of and, in many parishes, if the Prothe colonies, and to deny to Ireland testant inhabitants wished spiritual that emancipation by which alone consolation, or to have the benefit her tranquillity and safety could of religious worship, the nearest be effectually secured.” Perhaps clergyman who could advise them,

manners.

will call for the restoration of the “I wish no physical ill to the royal people's property. Through the doors duke; but if he has thrown his oath in of the House of Commons we will tell the way of our liberties, and that as the peasantry that their property is in long as he lives justice shall not be the hands of men who abuse and done to the people of Ireland, it is trample on them. We will announce to mockery to tell me that the people of them who are the robbers of the poor, Ireland have not an interest in his and when we have done that, let such ceasing to live. Death is the corrector statesmen as Liverpool and Peel keep of human errors; it is said to be man's us unemancipated, in order to strengthen hour for repentance, and God's oppor- and secure the established church.” tunity. If the royal duke should not become converted from his political “England's weakness is our aderrors, I am perfectly resigned to the vantage. I do not rejoice at individual will of God, and shall abide the result distress or misfortune, but I cannot with the most christian resignation help being gratified by the national [laughter and cheers). The Whigs, misfortunes of England. Her revenue and, amongst others, lord Grosvenor, is on the decline, while her expenditure have blamed us for the honest expres- is increasing. I read with pleasure of sion of our opinions. I blame the the cheers with which the speech of Whigs for this A former duke of Mr. Canning was received at the Man. York, the flegitimate king of England, sion-house in London, when he told was dethroned by the English Whigs, them that there was not the least danalthough he had never taken an oath ger of war--all was hush! Oh! buagainst their rights and liberties; and miliated England ! When before did who, instead of endeavouring to injure she fear battle; and was not the peace a single Protestant in person or in pro- of the world at her disposal ? Was she perty, could be only charged with the not always ready to enter the field at crime of proclaiming perfect liberty of the call of glory, interest, or honour ? conscience. Only contrast the duke of But Mr. Canning told these good boys York whom they dethroned with our that there was no danger of the peace modern duke !”

of the world being disturbed. I undera

stand his meaning well-England dare “We will drag before the House of not go to war while Ireland remains Commons the enormous abuses of the discontented."

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however, was still kept before the the speech of lord Liverpool delieye of both Houses by petitions „vered the year before, and chafrom different districts and bodies racterized the imputation of divided in Ireland, particularly those pre- allegiance as "a false pretence,” sented to the House of Peers, by because the Catholics in all their pes. lords Darnley and Grey, and the tions declared, that, in the oaths marquis of Lansdown, and to the which they took, and were ready Commons by sir Francis Burdett, to take, they swore allegiance to and Mr. Brougham. The peti- his majesty alone. Lord Liverpool tions were more especially directed answered, that although he never to a disclaimer of the imputation doubted the sincerity of the Caof owing a divided allegiance; tholics in disclaiming civil alleevidently on account of the weight giance to any foreign power, the which the argument of the Anti- fact could not affect the

argument; Catholics on this point had carried for his argument was that spiritual with it, or had seemed to carry subjection to a foreign power was with it, in the debate of the pre- inconsistent with civil obedience ceding session. Lord Darnley, in to our own sovereign. fact, in presenting a petition from At the same time, a sort of Drogheda, proceeded to answer schism threatened to take place of his learning, and the suavity of his established church (loud cheers). We

manners.

will call for the restoration of the “I wish no physical ill to the royal people's property. Through the doors duke; but if he has thrown his oath in of the House of Commons we will tell the way of our liberties, and that as the peasantry that their property is in long as he lives justice shall not be the hands of men who abuse and done to the people of Ireland, it is trample on them. We will announce to mockery to tell me that the people of them who are the robbers of the poor, Ireland have not an interest in his and when we have done that, let such ceasing to live. Death is the corrector statesmen as Liverpool and Peel keep of human errors; it is said to be man's us unemancipated, in order to strengthen hour for repentance, and God's oppor- and secure the established church.” tunity. If the royal duke should not become converted from his political “England's weakness is our aderrors, I am perfectly resigned to the vantage. I do not rejoice at individual will of God, and shall abide the result distress or misfortune, but I cannot with the most christian resignation help being gratified by the national (laughter and cheers]. The Whigs, misfortunes of England. Her revenue and, amongst others, lord Grosvenor, is on the decline, while her expenditure have blamed us for the honest expres- is increasing. I read with pleasure of sion of our opinions. I blame the the cheers with which the speech of Whigs for this. A former duke of Mr. Canning was received at the Man. York, the flegitimate king of England, sion-house in London, when he told was dethroned by the English Whigs, them that there was not the least danalthough he had never taken an oath ger of war--all was hush! Oh! buagainst their rights and liberties; and miliated England ! When before did who, instead of endeavouring to injure she fear battle; and was not the peace a single Protestant in person or in pro- of the world at her disposal? Was she perty, could be only charged with the not always ready to enter the field at crime of proclaiming perfect liberty of the call of glory, interest, or honour ? conscience. Only contrast the duke of But Mr. Canning told these good boys York whom they dethroned with our that there was no danger of the peace modern duke !!!

of the world being disturbed. I under

stand his meaning well--England dare “ We will drag before the House of not go to war while Ireland remains Commons the enormous abuses of the discontented."

between the Catholics and the the Dissenters might have anDissenters. It appeared to the swered, without being thought to former, that the Dissenters, from violate sound reasoning, that, alwhom as also labouring under though Dissenters, they were political disqualifications they na- Protestants; that apprehensions of turally looked for sympathy and the influence of foreign spiritual support, had either openly join- supremacy, the conviction of the ed the body of their opponents, or degrading and debasing effects of had manifested only a cold and the Catholic superstition in all the discouraging neutrality, not re- relations of life, and the reasonable flecting, that the liniment applied dread that all its powerful control annually, in the shape of an In- over the minds of its adherents demnity bill, to the sores of the must be, and would be, directed to Dissenters, prevented that constant the overthrow of the Protestant irritation which kept the wounds religion, and of the form of goof the Catholics perpetually green, vernment that gave supremacy to especially under the care of such protestantism--that all these causes rash, and ignorant, and interested, of opposition, whether well founded practitioners as the associated or not, were common to all Protesagitators, and that it is never easy tants; and that no inconsistency to rouse men to battle for an ab- could exist in the union of a church stract principle, where no practical man and a dissenter to repel a inconvenience is felt, or supposed common danger.

to be felt, from its non-assertion. While the claims of the Catho'Lord Darnley complained bitterlylics were merely the subject of of their inconsistency in pressing incidental remarks, the condition the olition of negro slavery, and of the Protestant church in Ireresisting the abolition of Catholic land, the discharge of its duties, disabilities. They form," said and the management of its funds, his lordship, a powerful and nu- were frequently made the subjects merous sect in this country, and of more direct discussion. are undoubtedly respectable and In the House of Lords, lord well-meaning: yet, while they Kingston moved for the appointwere urging the government and ment of a committee to inquire parliament to precipitate the eman- into the state of the Protestant cipation of the negroes, they were church in the province of Munster. busily engaged last year, in most He founded his motion upon the unnatural connection with the evils which he stated to have High Church party, in induc- arisen from the union of livings, ing their lordships to reject the and the consequent wantof churches prayer of the Catholics of Ireland. to which the Protestant people In one breath, these persons called might repair. In the province in upon parliament to precipitate a question his lordship stated, it had measure, the precipitation of which not been uncommon to unite five, it was by no means impossible six, or seven livings in one person; might compromise the safety of and, in many parishes, if the Prothe colonies, and to deny to Ireland testant inhabitants wished spiritual that emancipation by which alone consolation, or to have the benefit her tranquillity and safety could of religious worship, the nearest be effectually secured.” Perhaps clergyman who could advise them,

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however, was still kept before the the speech of lord Liverpool delieye of both Houses by petitions „vered the year before, and chafrom different districts and bodies racterized the imputation of divided in Ireland, particularly those pre- allegiance as “a false pretence,” sented to the House of Peers, by because the Catholics in all their pe-, lords Darnley and Grey, and the tions declared, that, in the oaths marquis of Lansdown, and to the which they took, and were ready Commons by sir Francis Burdett, to take, they swore allegiance to and Mr. Brougham. The peti- his majesty alone. Lord Liverpool tions were more especially directed answered, that although he never to a disclaimer of the imputation doubted the sincerity of the Caof owing a divided allegiance; tholies in disclaiming civil alleevidently on account of the weight giance to any foreign power, the which the argument of the Anti- fact could not affect the argument; Catholics on this point had carried for his argument was that spiritual with it, or had seemed to carry subjection to a foreign power was with it, in the debate of the pre- inconsistent with civil obedience ceding session. Lord Darnley, in to our own sovereign. fact, in presenting a petition from At the same time, a sort of Drogheda, proceeded to answer schism threatened to take place of his learning, and the suavity of his established church (loud cheers). We

manners.

will call for the restoration of the “ I wish no physical ill to the royal people's property. Through the doors duke; but if he has thrown his oath in of the House of Commons we will tell the way of our liberties, and that as the peasantry that their property is in long as he lives justice shall not be the hands of men who abuse and done to the people of Ireland, it is trample on them. We will announce to mockery to tell me that the people of them who are the robbers of the poor, Ireland have not an interest in his and when we have done that, let such ceasing to live. Death is the corrector statesmen as Liverpool and Peel keep of human errors; it is said to be man's us unemancipated, in order to strengthen hour for repentance, and God's oppor- and secure the established church.” tunity. If the royal duke should not become converted from his political “England's weakness is our aderrors, I am perfectly resigned to the vantage. I do not rejoice at individual will of God, and shall abide the result distress or misfortune, but I cannot with the most christian resignation help being gratified by the national slaughter and cheers). The Whigs, misfortunes of England. Her revenue and, amongst others, lord Grosvenor, is on the decline, while her expenditure have blamed us for the honest expres- is increasing. I read with pleasure of sion of our opinions. I blame the the cheers with which the speech of Whigs for this. A former duke of Mr. Canning was received at the Man. York, the flegitimate king of England, sion-house in London, when he told was dethroned by the English Whigs, them that there was not the least danalthough he had never taken an oath ger of war--all was hush! Oh! hu. against their rights and liberties; and miliated England ! When before did who, instead of endeavouring to injure she fear battle; and was not the peace a single Protestant in person or in pro- of the world at her disposal ? Was she perty, could be only charged with the not always ready to enter the field at crime of proclaiming perfect liberty of the call of glory, interest, or honour? conscience. Only contrast the duke of But Mr. Canning told these good boys York whom they dethroned with our that there was no danger of the peace modern duke !"

of the world being disturbed. I under,

stand his meaning well--England dare “ We will drag before the House of not go to war while Ireland remains Commons the enormous abuses of the discontented."

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