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another way I sought materials fidious conduct of the servants of, of compensation in another hemis- the king of Spain, to the captainsphere. Contemplating Spain, such general of provinces, and to infeas our ancestors had known her, I rior ministers, than to his Catholic resolved that if France had Spain, majesty. Whether, however, they it should not be Spain with the proceeded from the one or the Indies. I called the New World other, he could not possibly see intoexistence, to redress the balance bodies of troops on both sides of of the Old.

the Douro, and on the south of “ Once more I declare, that the the Tagus and the Guadiana, at object of the address, which I pro- the same time, all armed by the pose is not war: its object is to Spanish authorities, without imtake the last chance of peace. If mediately perceiving that there you do not go forth, on this oc must be a concurrence of the Spacasion to the aid of Portugal, Por- nish government. Under the cirtugal will be trampled down, to cumstances, therefore, of this preyour irretrievable disgrace: -and concerted invasion of the Portuthen will come war in the train of guese territory, he was of 'opinion, national degradation. If, under that the casus foederis did clearly circumstances like these, you wait exist. War, however, might still till Spain has matured her secret be prevented ; and he hoped for the machinations into open hostility, cordial assistance of France, by you will in a little while have the negotiations, in preventing the sort of war required by the pacifi- breaking out of hostilities, in bringcators :-and who shall say where ing his Catholic majesty to a just that war will end ?"

sense of his own danger, to a proper The Amendment was put and feeling of what was due both to negatived, there appearing only his dignity and his interest, and three or four supporters for Mr. to the obligations of good faith. Hume's proposition.

The ori Lord Lansdowne also declared ginal question was then put and his full approbation of the procarried, with only the same number posed measure; and the address of dissentients.

was carried without a dissentient On the same night, in the voice. House of Lords, a similar address The unanimity which prevailed was moved by lord Bathurst, and in parliament on this decisive measeconded by lord Holland. The sure, was not more perfect than duke of Wellington spoke next; was the universal concurrence of beginning by expressing a hope sentiment regarding it, which exthat it would be permitted to him, isted throughout the country. The who for many years had had the reasons on which it was founded, direction of the resources of both and the promptitude with which it the countries which formed the had been adopted, inspired confisubject of discussion, against the dence; the ardour, the manliness, common enemy, to lament that the deep tone of generous feeling any necessity should arise for our with which it had been defended, interference between them. He excited esteem and admiration. also hoped, that the measures which Never were a government and its called for our interference, were subjects in more complete unison. more to be attributed to the per. The activity of the public offices

kept pace with the wishes of both; mons on the 12th of December, an armament consisting of five and on Christmas day, the ship, thousand men, under the command which carried the first detachment of sir William Clinton, was equip- of the British army, cast anchor in ped in an almost incredibly short the waters of the Tagus. space of time. Even the winds of On the 13th of December, the heaven seemed to favour the en- House adjourned till the 8th of terprise. Mr. Canning pronounced February. his speech in the House of Com is

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another way I sought materials fidious conduct of the servants of of compensation in another hemis- the king of Spain, to the captains phere. Contemplating Spain, such general of provinces, and to infeas our ancestors had known her, I rior ministers, than to his Catholic resolved that if France had Spain, majesty. Whether, however, they it should not be Spain with the proceeded from the one or the Indies. I called the New World other, he could not possibly see into existence, toredress the balance bodies of troops on both sides of of the Old.

the Douro, and on the south of “ Once more I declare, that the the Tagus and the Guadiana, at object of the address, which I pro- the same time, all armed by the pose is not war: its object is to Spanish authorities, without imtake the last chance of peace. If mediately perceiving that there you do not go forth, on this oc must be a concurrence of the Spacasion to the aid of Portugal, Por- nish government. Under the cirtugal will be trampled down, to cumstances, therefore, of this preyour irretrievable disgrace: -and concerted invasion of the Portuthen will come war in the train of guese territory, he was of 'opinion, national degradation. If, under that the casus foederis did clearly circumstances like these, you wait exist. War, however, might still till Spain has matured her secret be prevented ; and he hoped for the machinations into open hostility, cordial assistance of France, by you will in a little while have the negotiations, in preventing the sort of war required by the pacifi- breaking out of hostilities, in bringcators :---and who shall say where ing his Catholic majesty to a just that war will end ?”

sense of his own danger, to a proper The Amendment was put and feeling of what was due both to negatived, there appearing only his dignity and his interest, and three or four supporters for Mr. to the obligations of good faith. Hume's proposition.

The ori. Lord Lansdowne also declared ginal question was then put and his full approbation of the procarried, with only the same number posed measure; and the address of dissentients.

was carried without a dissentient On the same night, in the voice. House of Lords, a similar address The unanimity which prevailed was moved by lord Bathurst, and in parliament on this decisive measeconded by lord Holland. The sure, was not more perfect than duke of Wellington spoke next;

was the universal concurrence of beginning by expressing a hope sentiment regarding it, which exthat it would be permitted to him, isted throughout the country. The who for many years had had the reasons on which it was founded, direction of the resources of both and the promptitude with which it the countries which formed the had been adopted, inspired confisubject of discussion, against the dence; the ardour, the manliness, common enemy, to lament that the deep tone of generous feeling any necessity should arise for our with which it had been defended, interference between them. He excited esteem and admiration. also hoped, that the measures which Never were a government and its called for our interference, were subjects in more complete unison. more to be attributed to the per- The activity of the public offices

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kept pace with the wishes of both; mons on the 12th of December,
an armament consisting of five and on Christmas day, the ship,
thousand men, under the command which carried the first detachment
of sir William Clinton, was equip- of the British army, cast anchor in
ped in an almost incredibly short the waters of the Tagus.
space of time. Even the winds of On the 13th of December, the
heaven seemed to favour the en- House 'adjourned till the 8th of
terprise. Mr. Canning pronounced February.
his speech in the House of Com-

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CHAP. VIII.

INDIA-Re-commencement of Hostilities with the Burmese Military

Operations in the neighbourhood of Prome-British Army advances to Melloone-Conferences and Terms of Peace accepted-The Treaty not being ratified, the Army takes Melloone-The Army advances to Pagahm-men-Battle there-A Treaty concluded and ratified-Siege and Capture of Bhurtpore by Lord Combermere.AFRICA-Defeat of the Ashantees.

T
VHE armistice which had been voured to exculpate their monarch

concluded on the 17th Sep- from any blame on account of the tember, 1825, between the British hostile acts committed in Arracan, and Burmese commanders, was not which had led to the war, by asemployed by the court of Ava in surances that they had been comany serious negotiations for peace, mitted without his authority or but in collecting forces for a vigor- consent, and that the remonstrances ous prosecution of the war. By. of the Indian government had the second article of the amnesty been kept from his knowledge. it had been agreed that a commis- In the terms of peace which were sioner from Ava, with full powers, proposed, they quarrelled princishould meet the British author- pally with the demands for a cesities, on the 2nd of October, half sion of part of their territory, and way between Prome and Meaday, an indemnification in money for the stations of the respective the expenses of the war, and laarmies, to treat of the re-establish- boured hard to have them withment of

peace. These conferences drawn, at least in the mean time, took place on the plain of Neoun- gravely holding out such considerben-zeik, the negotiators on each ations as this, that the dignity of side being accompanied by a train the king of Ava did not allow him of five hundred men, as the dignity to submit to terms imposed upon of the prime minister of Ava did him by a present force, but that, not allow him to move with a so soon as the Indian government' smaller retinue. The Burmese should have withdrawn their army commissioners displayed ostensibly from the country, there was nothe most amicable dispositions ; thing which his generosity would were anxious in their inquiries not concede to them. Being unafter the health of his majesty of able to obtain any modification of England, and the latest news ; the terms, they desired, and ob uniformly spoke of Britain and tained, an extension of the armisAva, as the "

two great and civil- tice for twenty days, that they ized nations,” and scrupulously might have time to transmit them avoided every thing which might to Ava, and receive new instrucbe construed into an acknowledg- tions. The extension of the armisment of inferiority. They endea- tice, although proposed by the

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