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embarkation of the Egyptian suc- 1826, stood out a siege of eight cours, and to impede, at all events, months. Its garrison was small, the complete blockade of Misso but determined, or rather, despelonghi by the Turkish fleet. "" He råte ; the failure of so many atfell in with a large division of it, tacks, and their long resistance to off Chiarenza, near the mouth of so many Turkish bombardments, the gulph, on the 25th of Novem-' had given them confidence: want ber, which attacked him both on of provisions was the greatest that and the following day. On danger which they had to appreboth occasions he repelled them, hend. The approaches on the with no other loss than that of a land side were in the hands of vessel which aecidentally took the besiegers; the harbour was fire ; but his inferiority in point blockaded by the Egyptian fleet; of strength, his force amounting to and, if the latter were allowed to little more than half of that of the remain masters of the gulph, Misenemy, and especially the absence solonghi could not be saved from of the Spezziot fire-ships, rendered being starved into a surrender. it impossible for him to make any Miaulis, who had found himself impression upon their fleet, or too weak to prevent the enemy's prevent it from entering the gulph. fleet from entering the gulph, or It reached Patras, and re-inforced to undertake any thing decisive Ibrahim's army by landing six against it when there, had return thousand fresh troops. With part ed to the south, leaving his fleet of these succours, Ibrahim imme- cruizing between Zante and Chiadiately sailed up the gulph, and, renza, to clear away the difficuleffecting a landing on its northern ties which had prevented him shore, marched to oppose a Greek from being joined by the Spezforce under Goura and Draco, ziote and Ipsariote "vessels. In which the government, on learn- this he succeeded, and the united ing the arrival of the Egyptian fleet appeared off the gulph of fleet, had ordered to advance from Lepanto on the 20th of January. Salona to the relief of Missolonghi. On the 22nd, an engagement took His troops, under Mohanem Bey, place between divisions of both met, and defeated them, although fleets, but they separated without without any serious loss, while his damage on either side, the vionaval armament destroyed a num- nce of the easterly winds making ber of small vessels, and captured it impossible for them to keep the a considerable quantity of provi- line of battle. On the 27th, the sions and ammunition. He then Turkish fleet, which was generally returned with his booty to Patras, at anchor off Patras, again bore and, having re-inforced the Seras- down upon the Greek squadron; kier, who had again advanced, the latter stood out to sea, to gain they proceeded together to press a more advantageous position ; the siege of Missolonghi, while then engaged, and, after a sharp the fleet blockaded the entrance action of some duration, compelled to its harbour.

the Turks' to return to Patras, with Missolonghi, the last hope of the loss of a frigate and a corvette. the patriots in Western Greece, These partial engagements, howhad already, at the beginning of ever, were of little lasting effect

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in relieving the besieged town, for shed much of their blood, have
they failed in the only thing by seen their habitations destroyed,
which they could assist it, the and their country laid waste; for
raising of the blockade of the all which nothing can indemnify
harbour. The Turkish fleet was them but liberty and indepen-
too strong to be driven from the 'dence. With regard to the as-
gulph, although, so long as Vas- sault which he threatens to make
siladi, a small fortified island, within eight days, we are ready to
commanding the mouth of the receive it; and, fighting with God
harbour, was in the hands of the on our side, we trust we shall be
Greeks, the enemy could not en- able to frustrate and repel it, as
tirely stop the entrance of pro- we did that of the Seraskier, in
visions into the town. On the July last.
land side, no more vigorous at- " For the rest, he is well aware
tack was made during the month that we have a Government, in
of January, than what consisted obedience to whose orders we fight
in throwing a few shells, or firing and die:-10 that government,
a few shots from the batteries. therefore, he

may

address himself, Ibrahim, with his usual caution, whenever he is disposed to negofrom the landing of his Egyptian ciate peace or war.” reinforcements, had been prepar- The Turkish army now before ing for a vigorous and general Missolonghi exceeded 20,000 men, attack, in which he trusted for 8,000 of whom were Egyptian success to the European disci- troops, trained to regular warfare, pline of his own troops, and the and supported by a numerous artalents of the European offi- tillery, well managed by European cers, principally French, Neapo- engineers. The garrison which litans, and Piedmontese, who di- resisted this overwhelming force vected his artillery. By the end did not amount to 2,000 men, of the month, every thing was under the command of Noto Boznearly in readiness; but, before zaris; and if the enemy had only the attack took place, the cap

perseverance, escape seemed to be tain of a British ship of war, the impracticable, for their very numRose, was made the bearer of a bers could weary out the useless message from the capitan pacha bravery of the besieged. Ibrahim to the garrison, in which he in- opened his tteries on the town formed them that, in eight days, about the middle of February, and the preparations for the assault continued a furious bombardment, would be completed, but that, without making any assault, till desirous to save the effusion of the 28th. On that day he led blood, which would necessarily his men to a general and simulensne if the city should be taken taneous attack; the Greeks reby storm, he wished to know, ceived him with their usual deswhether the garrison was willing perate bravery, having previously to capitulate, and if so, what excited themselves into' enthusiterms they demanded? The an- asm, by taking the holy sacraswer was,

“ The capitan pacha ment, as if moving to inevitable knows that the Greeks have suf- death. The contest was long and fered losses without end, have doubtful, and the carnage dread

ful; but the despair of the Greeks cruizing in the neighbourhood, prevailed, and Ibrahim was re- was too weak in force to risk a pulsed upon every point, with a battle; and the fate of Missoloss which, according to some, longhi was sealed. Ibrahim could amounted to three thousand men. assault both on the sea and on On the 2nd of March he made a the land side; and, between the similar attempt, and was again 18th of March, and the end of repulsed; while the Greeks, sally- the month, he made several furiing from the town, drove in his ous attacks, combining all his preout-posts, and insulted his en- parations in a manner which seemtrenchments.

ed to promise decisive success. Ibrahim, while he allowed his Ibrahim himself, in the last of troops to recover from the conse- these assaults, led on his men. quences of these unsuccessful as- While the attack was made on saults, now directed his attention the land side, a numerous flotilla with greater earnestness to the of boats, crowded with troops, project of starving the town, and made a simultaneous attack from thus compelling the garrison the sea. On the latter point the either to surrender at discretion, attack, at first, succeeded; the or expose themselves, in a despe- Egyptians surmounted all the rate attempt to break through the difficulties presented by the nature circle which surrounded them, to of the ground, and made their almost certain destruction, from way as far as the custom-house. his immense superiority of force. But the Greeks had formed a To gain this end, it was essential rampart of hogsheads filled with to make himself master of the sand, and surmounted with cansmall island of Vassiladi, the non; behind this they entrenched guns of whose fortress prevented themselves, and kept up so dehis fleet from establishing a per- structive a fire, that the Egyptians fect and actual blockade, and pre- and Turks were again driven back venting a frequent entrance of in disorder, leaving behind them small vessels laden with provi- two thousand of their bravest sions, from Zante and Cephalonia. troops. It had already resisted several at- Ibrahim had now learned the tacks, but, on the 9th of March, temper of the garrison, and wisehe succeeded in carrying it, in ly resolved not hastily again to consequence, it is said, of a shell squander his men in such costly having fallen in the powder maga- attacks upon opponents, who seemzine during the assault, and at ed to be as immovable as the walls once produced confusion in the which they defended. Keeping garrison, and deprived them of within his entrenchments, and their means of defence. On the maintaining, by his occupation of 13th, he was equally successful Vassiladi, a strict blockade of the against the fortified island of Ana- harbour, he patiently awaited the tolico. His ships of war could issue which his very position, and now anchor where it suited them; the failure of provisions in the his armed boats could prevent a town, could not fail soon to prosingle plank from entering the duce.

Abundance and repose harbour: the Greek fleet, though reigned in his camp; the Greeks. in relieving the besieged town, for shed much of their blood, have they failed in the only thing by seen their habitations destroyed, which they could assist it, the and their country laid waste; for raising of the blockade of the all which nothing can indemnify harbour. The Turkish fleet was them but liberty and indepentoo strong to be driven from the dence. With regard to the asgulph, although, so long as Vas- sault which he threatens to make siladi, a small fortified island, within eight days, we are ready to commanding the mouth of the receive it; and, fighting with God harbour, was in the hands of the on our side, we trust we shall be Greeks, the enemy could not en- able to frustrate and repel it, as tirely stop the entrance of pro- we did that of the Seraskier, in visions into the town. On the July last. land side, no more vigorous at- " For the rest, he is well aware tack was made during the month that we have a Government, in of January, than what consisted obedience to whose orders we fight in throwing a few shells, or firing and die:--to that government, a few shots from the batteries. therefore, he may address himself, Ibrahim, with his usual caution, whenever he is disposed to negofrom the landing of his Egyptian ciate peace or war." reinforcements, had been prepar- The Turkish army now before ing for a vigorous and general Missolonghi exceeded 20,000 men, attack, in which he trusted for 8,000 of whom weré Egyptian success to the European disci- troops, trained to regular warfare, pline of his own troops, and the and supported by a numerous artalents of the European offi- tillery, well managed by European cers, principally French, Neapo- engineers. The garrison which litans, and Piedmontese, who di- resisted this overwhelming force vected his artillery. By the end did not amount to 2,000 men, of the month, every thing was under the command of Noto Boznearly in readiness; but, before žaris; and if the enemy had only the attack_took place, the cap- perseverance, escape seemed to be tain of a British ship of war, the impracticable, for their very numRose, was made the bearer of a bers could weary out the useless message from the capitan pacha bravery of the besieged. Ibrahim to the garrison, in which he in- opened his batteries on the town formed them that, in eight days, about the middle of February, and the preparations for the assault continued a furious bombardment, would be completed, but that, without making any assault, till desirous to save the effusion of the 28th. On that day he led blood, which would necessarily his men to a general and simulensue if the city should be taken taneous attack; the Greeks reby storm, he wished to know, ceived him with their usual deswhether the garrison was willing perate bravery, having previously to capitulate, and if so, what excited themselves into enthusiterms they demanded ? The an- asm, by taking the holy sacraswer was, “ The capitan pacha ment, as if moving to inevitable knows that the Greeks have suf- death, The contest was long and fered losses without end, have doubtful, and the carnage dreadful; but the despair of the Greeks cruizing in the neighbourhood, prevailed, and Ibrahim was re- was too weak in force to risk a pulsed upon every point, with a battle; and the fate of Missoloss which, according to some, longhi was sealed. Ibrahim could amounted to three thousand men. assault both on the sea and on On the 2nd of March he made a the land side; and, between the similar attempt, and was again 18th of March, and the end of repulsed; while the Greeks, sally- the month, he made several furiing from the town, drove in his ous attacks, combining all his preout-posts, and insulted his en- parations in a manner which seemtrenchments.

ed to promise decisive success. Ibrahim, while he allowed his Ibrahim himself, in the last of troops to recover from the conse.. these assaults, led on his men. quences of these unsuccessful as- While the attack was made on saults, now directed his attention the land side, a numerous flotilla with greater earnestness to the of boats, crowded with troops, project of starving the town, and made a simultaneous attack from thus compelling the garrison the sea. On the latter point the either to surrender at discretion, attack, at first, succeeded; the or expose themselves, in a despe- Egyptians surmounted all the rate attempt to break through the difficulties presented by the nature circle which surrounded them, to of the ground, and made their almost certain destruction, from way as far as the custom-house. his immense superiority of force. But the Greeks had formed a To gain this end, it was essential rampart of hogsheads filled with to make himself master of the sand, and surmounted with cansmall island of Vassiladi, the non ; behind this they entrenched guns of whose fortress prevented themselves, and kept up so dehis fleet from establishing a per- structive a fire, that the Egyptians fect and actual blockade, and pre- and Turks were again driven back venting a frequent entrance of in disorder, leaving behind them small vessels laden with provi- two thousand of their bravest sions, from Zante and Cephalonia. troops. It had already resisted several at- Ibrahim had now learned the tacks, but, on the 9th of March, temper of the garrison, and wisehe succeeded in carrying it, in ly resolved not hastily again to consequence, it is said, of a shell squander his men in such costly having fallen in the powder maga- attacks upon opponents, who seemzine during the assault, and at ed to be as immovable as the walls once produced confusion in the which they defended. Keeping garrison, and deprived them of within his entrenchments, and their means of defence. On the maintaining, by his occupation of 13th, he was equally successful Vassiladi, a strict blockade of the against the fortified island of Ana- harbour, he patiently awaited the tolico. His ships of war could issue which his very position, and now anchor where it suited them; the failure of provisions in the his armed boats could prevent a town, could not fail soon to prosingle plank from entering the duce. Abundance and repose harbour : the Greek fleet, though reigned in his camp ; the Greeks

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