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Mr. W. A. Provis, the resident suspending piers, where the chains engineer, was despatched to meet rest. The vertical rods, an inch the London (via Shrewsbury) square, suspended from the chains, mail, and take charge of it across support the slippers for the floorthe bridge. He having mounted ing of the road-way, the rods being the box with the coachman, the placed five feet from each other. mail proceeded, and on its way to The chains, sixteen in number, the bridge took up as many as contain five bars each ; the length could either be crammed in, or of each bar is 9 feet 9 inches, the find a place to hang by. Thus width 3 inches by 1 inch square, loaded, amidst the blaze of lamps, with six connecting lengths at each the cheers of those assembled, and joint, 1 foot 6 inches, by 10 inches, the roaring of a heavy gale of and 1 inch square, secured by two wind, the gates were thrown open, bolts at each joint, each bolt weighand the mail passed triumphantly ing about 65 pounds: the total

number of bars, in the cross secAbout nine o'clock, sir H. Par- tion of the chains, is eighty. nell, and the chief engineer, Mr. The whole is suspended from Telford, passed over in the carriage four lines of iron cables by perof the latter. Throughout the pendicular iron rods, placed five remainder of the day the number feet apart, and these rods support of carriages, as well as horses and the road-way framing: The suspersons that passed over, was im- pending power is calculated at

2016 tons, and the weight to be The extreme length of the suspended, exclusive of the cables, chains from the fastenings in the is 342 tons, leaving a disposable rocks, is about 1600' feet. The power of 1674 tons. The weight height of the road-way from high- of the whole bridge between the water line, is 100 feet. Each of points of suspension is 489 tons. the seven small piers, from high- It is calculated that the contraction water line to the spring of the and expansion of the iron cables arches, is 65 feet. The span of may occasion a rise or fall to the each arch is 50 feet. Each of the extent of 4 or 5 inches; but the two suspending piers is 52 feet variations of the temperature of above the road. The road on the the atmosphere will not derange bridge consists of two carriage the

bridge. ways (one way for going, and the The abutments consist of maother for returning) of 12 feet sonry-work; four additional arches each, with a foot-path of 4 feet are on the Anglesea side; each of between these two carriage-ways. the two piers is 60 feet, by 427 The carriage-roads pass through wide at high-water mark, having two arches, in the suspending piers, a foundation of rock. These piers of the width of 9 feet, by 15 feet are connected with the whole of in height to the spring of the the remainder of the masonry, and arches. To counteract the con- form a mass constructed with blocks traction and expansion of the iron, of hard lime-stone, of much greater from the effect of the change of weight than is necessary for supthe atmosphere in winter and sum- porting a bridge of this kind. This mer, rollers are placed under cast- bridge is, perhaps, (with the single iron saddles, on the tops of the exception of the Simplon road), the

most stupendous monument of hu- tive places; the officer of the man art in the world. The sea order signified his majesty's comrushes in a dark and turbulent mand for filling the vacant stall. confusion of currents between the His grace the duke of Dorset, precipitous shores of Anglesea and the king's master of the horse, the main land ; many small rocks, was introduced into the

presence partly hidden, except at low water, of the chapter, and received the augment the perplexity and danger honour of knighthood from the of the passage; the winds blow king, and his

grace

then retired. furiously down the ravine, and The suffrages were then colproduce, even when the weather lected from the different knights is moderate elsewhere, a perfect forming the chapter. His grace tempest of spray. Altogether, ex- the duke of Dorset was declared cept in the very finest season of duly elected. His

grace was then the year, the Menai ferry was a received at the door of the chapter sufficient trial for not the weakest room by the two junior knights of nerves.

The narrowest part of present, attended by the garter the strait is 500 feet in width, and principal king of arms, bearing the here it is now crossed by a conve- ensigns of the order, and his grace nient bridge 30 feet in breadth, being introduced to the king, he suspended 100 feet above the sur- was graciously pleased to invest face of the water from enormous the duke therewith. The officers stone buttresses, 152 feet in height. of the order pronounced the usual This magnificent bridge, Mr. Tel- admonition to the newly-elected ford's road across Anglesea, and member of the order, who received the establishment of steam-packets the congratulations of all the memat Holyhead, have perfected the bers present. communication between this coun The chapter being ended, gartry and Dublin; and, taking it ter king of arms called over the merely in a political point of view, knight's companions, and the prothe completion of this great plan is cession returned in the order in a matter of high importance.

which it had been made in the 31. CHAPTER OF THE GARTER. chapter room.

Yesterday his majesty commanded a court for various public procedures, to be held at his

FEBRUARY. Royal Castle at Windsor.

STEAM NAVIGATION.-A few Arrangements having

been made days ago, the steam-boat Liberator for holding a chapter of the order left Liverpool, destined for the of the garter, a procession was river Orinoco, (in the Republic formed in the private room of the of Colombia,) where she is to be most noble order of the garter, in employed. She will not use her order to confer the ribband vacant engine on crossing the Atlantic, by the death of the late earl of but will stop at Grenada to set it Carlisle, knight companion of the up, whence she will proceed and get order.

into the Orinoco in perhaps twentyThe knights companions and four hours after her departure officers having proceeded from the from Grenada. In about six months private apartment into the chapter another steam-boat will leave Liroom, and taken their respec- verpool for the same destination.

EARTHQUAKE.“-A shock of an associated for a voyage to the coasts earthquake was felt in the province of Natal and Fumos, with a view of Basilicata, in the kingdom of of forming an establishment there. Naples. Sixty houses in the district The Salisbury was fitted out for of Tito were thrown down; all the this purpose, freighted at a very buildings in the populous town great expense, and accompanied by of Potenza suffered more or less, lieutenant Farewell, of his maand in both places many persons jesty's navy, one of the proprietors. were buried under the ruins. The vessel being provided with in

POMPEJI.-A fresco painting terpreters, passed up the Natal has been discovered at Pompeii, coast, tried several rivers, and at representing an eruption of Vesu- length entered the port of Natal, vius, and several processions at the which had not been entered by foot of the mountain ; Cape Mise- 'any vessel for, perhaps, half a cennum and the city of Naples are in tury before. The voyage was unthe back-ground. This picture successful in a commercial point of indicates that Vesuvius was for- view, not more than half a ton of merly of prodigious 'height, and ivory being collected ; but lieuthat the frequent eruptions have tenant Farewell having attempted lowered it considerably ; it also to land in a boat at St. Lucia, was shews that the Somma did not upset in the surf, and Jacob, one exist, or rather that it formed a

of the interpreters who was with part of Vesuvius, and has been him, thinking that by being shipseparated from it by a volcanic wrecked he was freed from his eneruption.

gagement, made his way to the NEW COLONY AT NATAL. - In court of Chaka, king of the Zoolos, consequence of the spirit of enter- or, the natives of Delaprise which the examination of goa Bay call them, Olontontes, Delagoa Bay, in 1823, and the where he speedily became a favourearly part of 1824, excited, several ite, and by his means lieutenant voyages were performed to that Farewell opened a communication part of the eastern coast of Africa, with that monarch. The result by the merchants of the Cape of was an invitation to lieutenant Good Hope. Among others Mr. Farewell to make a settlement at Henry Nourse fitted out a vessel, Natal, and, in July 1824, he left and, as part of her return-cargo, the Cape in a schooner of thirty she brought a quantity of the tusks tons, with about twenty persons, of the hippopotami, which had for- -himself, and two other genmerly been regarded by the Por- tlemen, a Mr. Fynn, two or three tuguese and natives as of very Hottentots, and the rest Dutch or trifling value. The sale of Mr. English from the Cape. On the Nourse's cargo, however, discovered 8th of August following, Chaka that sea-horse ivory was worth executed a grant of land to lieuhalf as much again as the tusks of tenant Farewell, including thirtythe elephant, and since that time five or forty miles of coast, and it has been in great demand, and about one hundred milesin breadth, better estimated by the Portu- inland. For this grant lieutenant guese.

Farewell appears to have paid some This trade being now a little consideration in beads, brass, and better understood, the merchants cloth. The vessel which carried

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the party to Natal was intended to His majesty's ship Lever, capt. be constantly employed between Owen, was the next that touched the Cape and the colony at Natal, at lieutenant Farewell's colony. but on her return she was burnt She arrived there on the 15th of at sea, and all on board perished. September last.

An officer on Nothing was heard of the little board says,

- It does not appear party of adventurers till nearly a that Mr. Farewell is sufficiently year afterwards, when, in May, provided to carry on his commerce 1825, the York, lieutenant Hawes, to any great extent.

He has, visited them, and brought some news however, collected about four tons of lieutenant Farewell's proceed- of ivory, much of it from the southings. That officer's first care had been ern parts. He had a quantity cola to form an establishment, and this lected near Ants River, to which was done to the northward of the place Mr. Fynn was gone, to conharbour, close to the watering- vey it to Natal. As every tooth place. The buildings consisted of had thus to be transported by land three small houses and a few huts a distance of 80 miles, his traffic made of clay and bushes, and sur must be laborious. The intervenrounded by a wall of five or six tion of hostile tribes likewise prefeet high, to defend them from the vents lieutenant Farewell from tigers and wolves, which were seen attempting a direct communication every evening in great numbers. with our old colony. But Chaka, Mr. Farewell was occupied in the understanding this, and affecting a construction of a large house, to be great regard for the English, has secured by a wall six feet high, determined an expedition and three in thickness, with plat- against all the Kaffres of the fronforms on which to place artillery. tier, of whom this extraordinary The party were healthy, and the savage says, he will not leave one soil was abundantly productive in man alive." grain and vegetables, ; but ow Mr. Fynn and the English of ing to their small number, they the party have adopted the Kaffre had not entered upon agriculturas costume (a skin, merely, round the pursuits. They had plenty of waist), but lieutenant Farewell game and cattle, but were in want retained his English dress. of bread and flour. They were on

2. SINGAPORE. · By an estithe best terms with the natives, mated value kept in the masterand had the protection of their king attendant's office, the trade of Sin(Chaka), who seemed to have great gapore has increased as follows: respect for Europeans. Three

In 1822, value of exports and imports 8,568,172 rivers, none of them navigable,

1823,

13,268,397 cross the settlement. The inha

15,000,000 bitants upon it were estimated at 1825, estimated at not less than 20,000,000 250, of whom 100 were sent by Large junks from different parts Chaka to protect the establishment. of China not only bring annually Chaka having conquered this tract a multitude of settlers, but also imonly two years before, had de- port and export valuable cargoes ; stroyed the greater number of the vessels of smaller sizes, from Siam inhabitants. The harbour is well and Cochin-China, are yearly inadapted for vessels not drawing creasing; a considerable trade also more than nine feet water,

is opening with Mauilla. The VOL. LXVIII.

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EARTHQUAKE.A shock of an associated for a voyage to the coasts earthquake was felt in the province of Natal and Fumos, with a view of Basilicata, in the kingdom of of forming an establishment there. Naples. Sixty houses in the district The Salisbury was fitted out for of Tito were thrown down; all the this purpose, freighted at a very buildings in the populous town great expense, and accompanied by of Potenza suffered more or less, lieutenant Farewell, of his maand in both places many persons jesty's navy, one of the proprietors. were buried under the ruins. The vessel being provided with in

POMPEII.--A fresco painting terpreters, passed up the Natal has been discovered at Pompeii, coast, tried several rivers, and at representing an eruption of Vesu- length entered the port of Natal, vius, and several processions at the which had not been entered by foot of the mountain ; Cape Mise- 'any vessel for, perhaps, half a cennum and the city of Naples are in tury before. The voyage was unthe back-ground. This picture successful in a commercial point of indicates that Vesuvius was for- view, not more than half a ton of merly of prodigious 'height, and ivory being collected ; but lieuthat the frequent eruptions have tenant Farewell having attempted lowered it considerably; it also to land in a boat at St. Lucia, was shews that the Somma did not upset in the surf, and Jacob, one exist, or rather that it formed a of the interpreters who was with part of Vesuvius, and has been him, thinking that by being shipseparated from it by a volcanic wrecked he was freed from his eneruption.

gagement, made his way to the NEW COLONY AT NATAL. In court of Chaka, king of the Zoolos

, consequence of the spirit of enter- or, the natives of Delaprise which the examination of goa Bay call them, Olontontes, Delagoa Bay, in 1823, and the where he speedily became a favourearly part of 1824, excited, several ite, and by his means lieutenant voyages were performed to that Farewell opened a communication part of the eastern coast of Africa, with that monarch. The result by the merchants of the Cape of was an invitation to lieutenant Good Hope. Among others Mr. Farewell to make a settlement at Henry Nourse fitted out a vessel, Natal, and, in July 1824, he left and, as part of her return-cargo, the Cape in a schooner of thirty she brought a quantity of the tusks tons, with about twenty persons, of the hippopotami, which had for himself, and two other genmerly been regarded by the Por- tlemen, a Mr. Fynn, two or three tuguese and natives as of very Hottentots, and the rest Dutch or trifling value. The sale of Mr. English from the Cape. On the Nourse's cargo, however, discovered 8th of August following, Chaka that sea-horse ivory was worth executed a grant of land to lieuhalf as much again as the tusks of tenant Farewell, including thirtythe elephant, and since that time five or forty miles of coast, and it has been in great demand, and about one hundred milesin breadth, better estimated by the Portu, inland. For this grant lieutenant guese.

Farewell appears to have paid some This trade being now a little consideration in beads, brass, and better understood, the merchants cloth. The vessel which carried

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