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L O N D ON:
Printed for JOHN DONALDSON, corner of Arundel-stree!,
No. 195. in the Strand. Sold by T. WILSON, at York:
A. SMITH, Halifax: D. AKEN HEAD, New-
castle: W. DARLING, Edinburgh: W. BOYD,
Dumfries: W. ANDERSON, Stirling :
ANGUS and Son, Aberdeen :

and L. FLIN, Dublin.

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THE

HI S Τ Ο R Y

OF

Sir Charles Grandison, Bart.

L E T T E R I.

Miss BYRON, TO Niss Lucy SELBY.

Thursday, March 16. IR Charles has already left us. He went to

town this morning on the affairs of his executorship. He breakfasted with us first.

Dr Bartlett, with whom I have already made. myself very intimate, and who, I find, knows his. whole heart, tells me he is always fully employed. That we knew before.- No wonder then, that he is not in love. He has not had leisure, I suppose, to attend to the calls of such an idle passion.

You will do me the justice to own, that in the round of employments I was engaged in at Selbyhouse, I never knew any-thing of the matter : But indeed there was no Sir Charles Grandison ; first to engage my gratitude, and then my heart.

heart. So it is; I must not, it seems, deny it. If I did, “a 16 child in love-matters would detect me."

ters.

was,

was

O my Lucy! I have been hard set by thele fif

They have found me out; or rather, let me know, that they long ago fąund me out. I will tell you all as it passed.

I had been so busy with my pen, that tho' accustomed to be first dressed, wherever I I now the last. They entered my dressing-room arm in arm ; and I have since récollected, that they looked as if they had mischief in their hearts; Miss Grandison especially. She had said, She would play me a trick.

I was in some little hurry, to be so much behind. hand, when I saw them dressed.

Mifs Grandifon would do me the honour of affisting me, and dismissed Jenny, who had but just come in to offer her service.

She called me charming creature twice, as she was obligingly busy about me; and the second time said, Well may my brother, Lady L. say what he did of this girl!

With too great eagerness, What, what, said II was going to add-did he say?-But, catching my.

in a tone of less surprise-designing to turn it off-WHAT honour you

do

me, madam, in this your kind asistance !

Miss Grandison leered archly at me; then turning to Lady L. This Harriet of ours, faid she, is more than half a rogue.

Punish her then, Charlotte, faid Lady L. You have, tho' with much ado, been brought to speak out yourself; and so have acquired a kind of right to punish those who affect disguises to their best friends.

Lord bless me, ladies! and down I fat-What, what I was going to say, do you mean? But stopt, and I felt my face glow.

What, what! repeated Miss Grandifon-My Sweet girl can say nothing but What, what !--One

of

of my fellows, Sir Walter Watkyns, is in her head, I suppose–Did you ever fee Hat-Watkys, Harriet?

My handkerchief was in my hand, as I was go. ing to put it on. I was unable to throw it round my neck. O how the fool throbbed, and trembled!

Miss Gr. Confirmation! Lady L. confirmation! Lady L. I think fo, truly-But it wanted nons

to me.

of

Har. I am surprised ! Pray, ladies, what can you mean by this sudden attack ?

Miss Gr. And what, Harriet, can you mean by these What, what's, and these sudden emotions ? Give me your handkerchief !-What doings arc here!

She snatched it out of my trembling hand, and put it round my neck-Why this sudden palpitation ? -Ah! Harriet! Why won't you make confidantes:

your sisters? Do you think we have not found you out before this?

Har. Found me out! How found me out!Dear Miss Grandifon, you are the most alarming lady that ever lived !

I stood up trembling.

Miss Gr. Am I fo? But to cut the matter short -[Sit down, Harriet. You can hardly stand]. Is it such a disgraceful thing for a fine girl to be in love ?

Har. Who I, I in love! Miss Gr. (laughing). So, Lady L. you see that Harriet has found herself out to be a fine girl! -Disqualify now; can't you, my dear? "Tell fibs. Be affected. Say you are not a fine girl, and-soforth.

Har. Dear Miss Grandisor. It was your turn. yesterday. How can you forget

Miss Gr. Spiteful too! My life to a farthing your pay for this, Harriet !-But, child, I was not in A 3

lave:

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