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Which, what it dare not doe by open might,

To worke by wicked treason wayes doth find, By such discourteous deeds discovering his base

kind.

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That well appears in this discourteous Knight,

The coward Turpinę, whereof now I treat;
Who notwithstanding that in former fight
He of the Prince his life received late,
Yet in his mind malitious and ingrate
He
gan

devize to be aveng'd anew Forall thatshame, which kindled inward hate:

Therefore, so soone as he was out of vew, Himselfe in haft he arm’d, and did him fast pursew.

III. Well did he tract his steps as he did ryde, Yet would not neare approch in daungers eye, But kept aloofe for dread to be descryde, Untill fit time and place he mote espý, Where he 'mote 'worke him fcath and villeny. At last he met two Knights to him unknowne, The which were armed both agreeably, And both combynd, whatever chaunce were

blowne, Betwixt them to divide and each to make his

owne.

III. 7.

agreeably,] Alike, like each other. See C. xi. ft. 36. CHURCH.

IV.

To whom false Turpine comming courteously,

To cloke the mischiefe which he inly ment, Gan to complaine of great discourtesie, Which a ftraunge Knight, that neare afore

him went, Had doen to him, and his deare Ladie shent ; Which if they would afford him ayde at need For to avenge in time convenient,

They fhould accomplish both a knightly deed, And for their paines obtaine of him a goodly

meed.

V.

The Knights beleev'd that all he fayd was trew;

And, being fresh and full of youthly spright, Were glad to heare of that adventure new, In which they mote make triall of their

might Which 'never yet they had approv'd in fight, And eke desirous of the offred meed: Said then the one of them; “ Where is that

wight, The which hath doen to thee this wrongfull

deed, That we may it avenge, and punish him with

speed ?”

youthly) The edition

V. 2. of 1751 reads youthfull. CHURCH.

Which, what it dare not doe by open might, To worke by wicked treason wayes

doth find, By such discourteous deeds discovering his base kind.

II.
That well appears in this discourteous Knight,

The çoward Turpinę, whereof now I treat ;
Who notwithstanding that in former fight
He of the Prince his life received late,
Yet in his mind malitious and ingrate
He gan devize to be aveng’d anew
Forall that shame, which kindled inward hate:

Therefore, fo foone as he was out of vew, Himselfe in hast he arm’d, and did him fast pursew.

III. Well did he tract his steps as he did ryde, Yet would not neare approch in daungers eye, But kept aloofe for dread to be descryde, Untill fit time and place he mote espy, Where he '

mote worke him fcath and villeny. At last he met two Knights to him unknowne, The which were armed both agreeably, And both combynd, whatever chaunce were

blowne, Betwixt them to divide and each to make his

owne.

III. 7.

agreeably,] -Alike, like each other. See C. xi. ft. 36. CHURCH.

IV.

To whom false Turpine comming courteously,

To cloke the mischiefe which he inly ment,
Gan to complaine of great discourtesie,
Which a straunge Knight, that neare afore

him went,
Had doen to him, and his deare Ladie shent;
Which if they would afford him ayde at need
For to avenge in time convenient,

They fhould accomplish both a knightly deed, And for their paines obtaine of him a goodly

meed.

V.

The Knights beleev'd that all he fayd was trew;

And, being fresh and full of youthly spright, Were glad to heare of that adventure new, In which they mote make triall of their

might Which never yet they had approv'd in fight, And eke desirous of the offred meed: Said then the one of them ; 66 Where is that

wight, The which hath doen to thee this wrongfull

deed, That we may it avenge, and punish him with

speed ?”

youthly] The edition

V. 2. of 1751 reads youthfull. CHURCH.

VI.

• He rides," said Turpine, “ there not farre

afore, With a Wyld Man soft footing by his fyde ; That, if ye

list to hafte a litle more, Ye may

him overtake in timely tyde.” Eftfoonės they pricked forth with forward

pryde; And, ere that litle while they ridden had, The gentle Prince not farre away they spyde,

Ryding a softly pace with portance fad, Devizing of his Love more then of daunger drad.

VII.

Then one of them aloud unto him cryde, Bidding him turne againe; “ False traytour

Knight, Foule woman-wronger !"-for he him defyde. With that they both at once with equall spight Did bend their speares, and both with equall

might Against him ran; but th’one did misle his

marke, And being carried with his force forthright Glaunft swiftly by; like to that heavenly

fparke, Which glyding through the ayre lights all the heavens darke.

like to that heavenly Sparke, Which glyding through the ayre lights all the heavens durke.] The fimile is elegant, and borrowed from Homer, who

VII. 8.

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