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INDEX

TO THE

ESSAY CONCERNING HUMAN UNDERSTANDING.

The Volumes are distinguished by the Roman Numerals i, ii, iii,
preceding the Number of the Page, and those Figures which follow
§ refer to the Section.

Abbot of St. Martin, vol. ii.

page 225, § 26.
Abstraction, i. 148, § 9.

Puts a perfect distance betwixt
men and brutes, i. 149, § 10.
What, i. 248, § 9.
How, i. 153, § 1.
Abstract ideas, whv made, ii. 138, 139, § 6, 7," 8.
■ terms cannot be affirmed one of another, ii. 249, § 1.
Accident, ii. 3, § 2.
Actions, the best evidence of
men's principles, i. 39, § 7.
But two sorts of actions, i. 238,

§4: i. 300, §11.
Unpleasant may be made plea-
sant, and how, i. 285, § 69.
Cannot be the same in different

places, ii. 48, § 2.
Considered as modes, or as
moral, ii. 106, § 15.
Adequate ideas, ii. 125, § 1, 2.
We have not of any species of
substances, ii. 377, § 26.
Affirmations are only in concrete,

ii. 249, § 1.
Agreement and disagreement of
our ideas fourfold, ii. 309—
314, §3,4,5,6,7.
Algebra, iii. 90, § 15.

Alteration, ii. 43, § 2.

Analogy, useful in natural phi-
losophy, iii. 110, § 12. Anger, i. 234, § 12, 14.

Antipathy and sympathy, whence,
ii. 151, §7.

Arguments of four sorts,

1. Ad verecundiam, iii. 134,
§ 19.

2. Ad ignorantiam,iii.l35, § 20.

3. Ad hominem, ib. § 21.

4. Ad judicium, ib. § 22. This
alone right, ib. § 22.

Arithmetic: the use of cyphers in arithmetic, ii. 371, § 19.
Artificial things are most of them
collective ideas, ii. 35, § 3.
Why we are less liable to con-
fusion,about artificial things,
than about natural, ii. 237,
§ 40.
Have distinct species, ii. 238,
§ 41.
Assent to maxims, i. 18, § 10.
Upon hearing and understand-
ing the terms, i. 23, § 17,18.
Assent, a mark of self-evi-
dence, i. 23, § 18.
Not of innate, i. 24, § 18: i. 25,
§ 19,20: i. 72, § 19.
Assent to probability, iii. 97, § 3.
Ought to be proportioned to the
proofs, iii. 159, § 1.

Association of ideas, ii. 148, § 1,
&c.
This association how made,

ii. 150, § 6.
Ill effects of it, as to anti-
pathies, ii. 151, § 7, 8:
ii. 154, § 15.
And this in sects of philosophy and religion, ii. 155, §18.
Its ill influences as to intel-
lectual habits, ib. § 17.
Assurance, iii. 105, § 6.
Atheism in the world, i. 60, § 8.
Atom, what, ii. 49, § 3.
Authority; relying on others'
opinions, one great cause
of error, iii. 172, § 17.

B.

Beings, but two sorts, iii. 59,
§9.
The eternal Being must be co-
gitative, ib. § 10.
Belief, what, iii. 97, § 3. To believe without reason, is

againstourduty,iii.l36, §24. Best in our opinion, not a rule of God's actions, i. 66, § 12.
Blind man, if made to see, would
not know which a globe,
which a cube, by his sight,
though he knew them by
his touch, i, 132, 133, § 8.
Blood, how it appears in a micro-
scope, ii. 15, § 11.
Brutes have no universal ideas,
i. 149, § 10,11.
Abstract not, ib. §10.
Body. We have no more pri-
mary ideas of body than of
spirit, ii. 21, § 16.
The primary ideas of body,

ib. §17.
The extension or cohesion of
body, as hard to be under-
stood, as the thinking of
spirit, ii. 23—27, § 23, 24,
25, 26, 27.

Moving of body by body, as
hard to be conceived as by
spirit, ii. 27, § 28.

Operates only by impulse, i.
121, § 11.

What, i. 163, §11.

The author's notion of his
body, 2 Cor. ver. 10, ii. 74,
and of his own body, 1 Cor.
xv. 35, &c. ii. 77. The
meaning of the same body,
ii. 72. Whether the word
body be a simple or com-
plex term, ii. 76. This only a
controversy about the sense
of a word, ii. 86.
But, its several significations, ii.
247, § 5.

C.

Capacity, i. 158, § 3.
Capacities, to know their extent,
useful, i. 3, § 4. To cure scepticism and idle-
ness, i. 5, § 6. Are suited to our present state,
i. 3, § 5.
Cause, ii. 42, § 1.

And effect, ib.
Certainty depends on intuition,
ii. 319, 320, § 1. Wherein it consists, ii. 397,
§18.

Of truth, iii. 1. To be had in very few general
propositions concerning sub-
stances, iii. 18, § 13. Whereto be had, iii. 21, § 16. Verbal, iii. 5, § 8. Real, ib.

Sensible knowledge, the ut-
most certainty we have of
existence, iii. 68, § 2. The author's notion of it not
dangerous, ii. 308, &c. How it differs from assurance,
iii. 105, § 6.
Changelings, whether men or no,
ii. 392, § 13, 14.

Clearness alone hinders confusion of ideas, i. 145, § 3.
Clear and obscure ideas, ii. Ill, §2.
Colours, modes of colours, i. 225,

§4.
Comments upon law, why in-
finite, ii. 256, § 9.
Complex ideas how made, i. 147,
§6: i. 153,§ 1.
In these the mind is more than

passive, i. 154, § 2.
Ideas reduceable to modes, sub-
stances, and relations, ib. §3.
Comparing ideas, i. 146, § 4.
Herein men excel brutes, ib.
§5.
Compounding ideas, i. 147, § 6.
In this is a great difference be-
tween men and brutes, ib.
§7.
Compulsion, i. 243, § 13.
Confidence, iii. 106, § 7.
Confusion of ideas, wherein it
consists, ii. 112, 113, § 5,
6,7.
Causes of confusion in ideas,
ii. 113—115, § 7, 8, 9: ii.
116, § 12.
Of ideas, grounded on a re-
ference to names, ii. 115,
116, § 10,11, 12. Its remedy, ii. 117, § 12.
Confused ideas, ii. 112, §4.
Conscience is our own opinion of

our own actions, i. 39, § 8.
Consciousness makes the same
person, ii. 55, 56, § 10: ii.
62, §16.
Probably annexed to the same
individual, immaterial sub-
stance, ii. 67, § 25.
Necessary to thinking, i. 88,

§ 10, 11: i 94, § 19.
What, ib. § 19.
Contemplation, i. 137, § 1.
Creation, ii. 43, § 2.

Not to be denied, because we
cannot conceive the manner
how, iii. 67, § 19.

VOL. III.

D.

Definition, why the genus is used in definitions, ii. 170, §10.
Defining of terms would cut off a
great part of disputes, ii.
277, § 15.
Demonstration, ii. 321, 322,
§3.
Not so clear as intuitive know-
ledge, ii. 322, § 4: ii. 323,
§6,7.
Intuitive knowledge necessary
in each step of a demonstra-
tion, ib. § 7.
Not limited to quantity, ii. 324, § 9.
Why that has been supposed, ii. 325, § 10.
Not to be expected in all cases, iii. 75, § 10.
What, iii. 96, § 1: iii. 132, § 15.
Desire, i. 232, § 6. Is a state of uneasiness, i. 254, 255, §31,32.
Is moved only by happiness, i. 262, § 41.
How far, i. 263, § 43.
How to be raised, i. 266, § 46.
Misled by wrong judgment, i.
277, § 60.
Dictionaries, how to be made, ii. 304,305, § 25.
Discerning, i. 144, § 1.
The foundation of some general
maxims, i. 144, § 1.
Discourse cannot be betweentwo
men, who have different
names for the same idea,
or different ideas for the
same name, i. 110, § 5.
Despair, i. 233, §11.
Disposition, i. 300, § 10.
Disputing. The art of disput-
ing prejudicial to know-
ledge, ii. 271—273, § 6, 7,
8,9.
Destrovs the use of language,
ii. 274, § 10.
Disputes, whence, i. 173, § 28.

A A

Disputes, multiplicity of them
owing to the abuse of words,
ii. 282, § 22.
Are most about the signification
of words, ii. 292, § 7.
Distance, i. 158, § 3.
Distinct ideas, ii. 112, § 4.
Divisibility of matter incompre-
hensible, ii. 29,30, § 31.
Dreaming,!. 228, §1.

Seldom in some men, i. 90,
§ 14.
Dreams for the most part irra-
tional, i. 92, § 16. In dreams no ideas but of sen-
sation, or reflection, i. 93,
§17.
Duration, i. 174, § 1, 2.

Whence we get the idea of
duration, i. 175, 176, § 3,
4,5.

Not from motion, i. 181, § 16. Its measure, ib. § 17,18.

Any regular periodical appear-
ance,!. 182,183, § 19,20. None of its measures known
to be exact, i. 184, § 21. We only guess them equal by
the train of our ideas, ib.
§ 21. Minutes, days, years, &c. not
necessary to duration, i.
186, § 23. Change of the measures of
duration, change not the
notion of it, ib. 23. The measures of duration, as
the revolutions of the sun,
may be applied to duration
before the sun existed, i.
187—189, § 24,25.28. Duration without beginning,
i. 188, §26. How we measure duration, i.
188— 190, §27,28, 29. Recapitulation,concerning out-
ideas of duration, time, and
eternity, i. 191, §31.
Duration and expansion com-
pared, i. 192, § 1.

They mutually embrace each

other,i.201,§ 12.
Considered as a line, i. 201,

111.
Duration not conceivable by us without succession, i. 201, § 12.

E.

Education, partly the cause of
unreasonableness, ii. 149,
§3.
Effect, ii. 42, § 1.
Enthusiasm, iii. 147.

Described, iii. 150, § 6, 7.
Its rise, iii. 149, § 5.
Ground of persuasion must
be examined, and how, iii.
152, §10.
Firmness of it, no sufficient

proof, iii. 155, § 12, 13.
Fails of the evidence it pre-
tends to, iii. 153, § 11.
Envy, i. 234, § 13, 14.
Error, what, iii. 159, § 1.
Causes of error, ib.

1. Want of proofs, ib. § 2.

2. Want of skill to use them,
iii. 162, §5.

3. Want of will to use them,
iii. 163, § 6.

4. Wrong measures of probabi-
lity, ib. §7.

Fewer men assent to errors
than is supposed, iii. 173,
§ 18.
Essence,real and nominal, ii.181,
§ 15.

Supposition of unintelligible,
real essences of species, of
no use, ii. 182, 183, § 17. Real and nominal essences,
in simple ideas and modes
always the same, in sub-
stances always different, ii.
183, § 18.
Essences, how ingenerable and
incorruptible, ii. 184, § 19.

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