Sivut kuvina
PDF
ePub

Specific essences of mixed
modes are of men's making,
and how, ii. 196, §3.

Though arbitrary, yet not at
random,ii. 199, § 7.

Of mixed modes, why called
notions, ii. 204, § 12.

What, ii. 208, § 2.

Relate onlv to species, ii. 209,
§4.

Real essences, what, ii. 211,

§6-

We know them not, ii. 213,

§9.

Onr specific essences of sub-
stances are nothing bnt col-
lections of sensible ideas,
ii. 220, § 21.

Nominal are made by the
mind, ii. 224, § 26.

Bat not altogether arbitrarily,
ii. 227, § 28.

Nominal essences of sub-
stances, how made, ii. 227,
228, § 28, 29.

Are Tery various, ii. 229, §
30: ii. 230, §31.

Of species, are the abstract
ideas, the names stand for,
ii. 173, § 12: ii. 184, § 19.

Are of man's making, ii. 178,
§ 12.

Bnt founded in the agreement
of things, ii. 179, §13.

Real essences determine not
our species, ii. 180, § 13.

Erery distinct, abstract idea,
with a name, is a distinct
essence of a distinct spe-
cies, ib. § 14.

Real essences of substances,
not to be known, iii. 18,
§ 12.

Essential, what, ii. 208, § 2: ii.
210, § 5.

Nothing essential to indi-
viduals, ii. 209, § 4.

But to species, ii. 211, § 6.

Essential difference, what, ii.
210, §5.

Eternal verities, iii. 77, § 14.

Eternity, in our disputes and
reasonings about it, why we
are apt to blunder, ii. 118,
§ 15.

Whence we get its idea, L 188,

§27. •
Evil, what, i. 262, § 42.
Existence, an idea of sensation

and reflection, i. 115, § 7.
Onr own existence we know

intnitively, iii. 55, § 2.
And cannot donbt of it, ib.
Of created things, knowable

only by our senses, iii. 68,

§ 1.

Past existence known only by
memory, iii. 75, § 11.
Expansion, boundless, i. 193,
§2.

Should be applied to space in
general, i. 172,§ 27.

Experience often helps us, where
we think not that it does,
i. 132, § 8.

Extasy, i. 228, § 1.

Extension: we have no distinct
ideas of very great, or very
little extension, ii. 119,
§ 16.

Of bodv, incomprehensible, ii.
23, § 23, &c.

Denominations, from place and
extension, are many of them
relatives, ii. 45, § 5.

And body not the same thing,
i. 163, §11.

Its definition insignificant, i.
165,§15.

Of body and of space how di-
stinguished, i. 109, § 5: i.
172, § 27.

F.

Faculties of the mind first ex-
ercised, i. 151, § 14.
Are but powers, i. 245, §
17.

Operate not, i. 246, 247, §
18. 20.

Faith and opinion, as distin-
guished from knowledge,
what, iii. 97, § 2, 3.

And knowledge, their dif-
ference, ib. § 3.

What, iii. 112, § 14.

Not opposite to reason, iii.
136, § 24.

As contra-distinguished to rea-
son, what, iii. 138, § 2.

Cannot convince us of any
thing contrary to our rea-
son, iii. 141, &c. § 5, 6.
8.

Matter of faith is only divine

revelation, iii. 145, § 9.
Things above reason are only
proper matters of faith, iii.'
144, § 7 : iii. 145, § 9.

Falsehood, what it is, iii. 6, § 9.

Fancy, i. 141, § 8.

Fantastical ideas, ii. 122, § 1.

Fear, i. 233, § 10.

Figure, i. 159, § 5, 6.

Figurative speech, an abuse of
language, ii. 288, § 34.

Finite, and infinite, modes of
quantity, i. 208, § 1.
All positive ideas of quantity,
finite, i. 213, § 8.

Forms, substantial forms distin-
guish not species, ii. 215,
§ 10.

Free, how far a man is so, i. 248,
§ 21.

A man not free to will, or

not to will, i. 248—250, §

22, 23, 24.'
Freedom belongs only to agents,

i. 246, §19.
Wherein it consists, i. 251, §

27.

Free will, liberty belongs not to
the will, i. 243, § 14.
Wherein consists that, which
is called free will, i. 250,
§ 24: i. 267, §47.

G.

General ideas, how made, i.
14S, § 9.
Knowledge, what, ii. 283, §
31.

Propositions cannot be known
to be true, without knowing
the essence of the species,
iii. 8, § 4.

Words, how made, ii. 164,165,
§ 6, 7, 8.
Belongs only to signs, ii. 172,
§ 11.

Gentlemen should not be igno-
rant, iii. 163, § 6.

Genus and species, what, ii. 176,
§ 10.

Are but Latin names for sorts,

ii. 201, § 9.
Is but a partial conception of

what is in the species, ii.

231, § 32.
And species adjusted to the end

of speech, ii. 233, § 33.
And species are made in order

to general names, ii. 236,

§ 39.

Generation, ii. 43, § 2.
God immoveable, because infinite,
ii. 22, § 21.
Fills immensity, as well as

eternity, i. 194, § 3.
His duration not like that of
the creatures, i. 201, 202,
§ 12.

An idea of God not innate,

i. 60, § 8.
The existence of a God evident,

and obvious to reason, i. 62,

§9.

The notion of a God once got,
is the likeliest to spread
and be continued, i. 65, §
9, 10.

Idea of God late and imperfect,

i. 68, § 13.
Contrary, i. 69, 70, § 15, 16.
Inconsistent, i. 69, § 15.

The best notions of God, got
by thought and application,

i. 70, § 15.

Notions of God frequently not
worthy of him, i. 71, § 16.

The being of a God certain,
ibid, proved, iii. 55.

As evident, as that the three
angles of a triangle are equal
to two right ones, i. 77, § 22.
Yea, as that two opposite
angles are equal, i. 71, § 16.

More certain than any other
existence without us, iii. 58,
• §6.

The idea of God, not the only
proof of his existence, ibid.
§ 7.

The being of a God the founda-
tion of morality and divinity,
iii. 58, § 7.

How we make our idea of God,

ii. 31, §33,34.

Gold is fixed; the various sig-
nifications of this proposi-
tion, ii. 244, § 50.

Water strained through it,
i. 109, § 4.
Good and evil, what, i. 231, § 2:
i. 262, § 42.

The greater good determines
not the will, i. 256, § 35:
i. 259, §38: i. 264, § 44.

Why, i. 265, §44: i. 266, §46:
i. 277, &c. § 59, 60. 64,
65. 68.

Twofold, i. 278, § 61.

Works on the will only by de-
sire, i. 266, § 46.

Desire of good how to be raised,
i. 266, 267, § 46, 47.

H.

Habit, i. 300, § 10.

Habitual actions pass often with-
out our notice, i. 134, § 10.

Hair, how it appears in a micro-
scope, ii. 15, § 1 J.

Happiness, what, i. 262, § 42.
What happiness men pursue,

i. 263, § 43.
How we come to rest in narrow
happiness, i. 277, § 59, 60.

Hardness, what, i. 108, § 4.

Hatred, i.232, §5: i. 234, § 14.

Heat and cold, how the sensation
of them both is produced, by
the same water, at the same
time, i. 125, § 21.

Historv, what history of most au-
thority, iii. 109, § 11.

Hope, i. 233, § 9.

Hypotheses, their use, iii. 89,
§ 13.

Are to be built on matter of
fact, i. 88, § 10.

I.

Ice and water whether distinct

species, ii. 218, § 13.
Idea, what, i. 119, § 8.
Ideas, their original in children,

i. 57, §2: i. 68, § 13.
None innate, i. 71, 72, § 17-
Because not remembered, i. 73,

§20.

Are what the mind is employed
about, in thinking, i. 82, § 1.

All from sensation, or reflec-
tion, ibid. § 2, &c.

How this is to be understood,

ii. 334.

Their way of getting, observa-
ble in children, i. 85, § 6.

Why some have more, some
fewer ideas, i. 85, § 7.

Of reflection got late, and in
some very negligently, i. 86,
§8.

Their beginning and increase
in children, i. 96—98, § 21,
22, 23, 24.

Their original in sensation and
reflection, i. 98, § 24.

Of one sense, i. 104, § 1.

Want names, i. 105, § 2.

Of more than one sense, i. 111.
Of reflection, i. 1ll, § I.

Of sensation and reflection, i.

112,5 1.
As in the mind, and in things,

must be distinguished, i.

119, § 7.
Not always resemblances, i.

122, § 15, &c.
Which are first, is not material

to know, i. 131, § 7.
Of sensation often altered by

the judgment, i. 132, § 8.
Principally those of sight,

i. 133, § 9.
Of reflection, i. 151, § 14.
Simple ideas men agree in,

i. 173, § 28.

Moving in a regular train in

our minds, i. 178, § 9.
Such as have degrees want

names, i. 226, § 6.
Why some have names, and

others not, ibid. § 7.
Original, i. 292, § 73.
All complex ideas resolvable

into simple, i. 298, § 9.
What simple ideas have been

most modified, i. 299, § 10.
Our complex idea of God, and

other spirits, common in

every thing, but infinitv,

ii. 32, 33, § 36.

Clear and obscure, ii. 1ll, §2.
Distinct and confused, ii. 112,
§4.

May be clear in one part and
obscure in another, ii. 117,
§ 13.

Real and fantastical, ii. 122,
J 1-

Simple are all real, ii. 122, § 2.
And adequate, ii. 125, § 2.
What ideas of mixed modes are

fantastical, ii. 123, 124, § 4.
What ideas of substances are

fantastical, ii. 124, § 5.
Adequate and inadequate, ii.

125, § 1.
How said to be in things, ibid.

§2.

Modes are all adequate ideas,

ii. 127, § 3.
Unless, as referred to names,

ii. 128, § 4, 5.
Of substances inadequate, ii.

134, § 11.

1. As referred to real essences,
ii. 129—131, § 6, 7.

2. As referred to a collection of
simple ideas, ii. 132, h 8.

Simple ideas are perfectsxJutfa,
ii. 134, 5 12.

Of substances are perfect
exluita., ii. 135, § 13.

Of modes are perfect arche-
types, ii. 136, § 14.

True or false, ibid. § 1, &c.

When false, ii. 146, &c. § 21,
22, 23, 24, 25.

As bare appearances in the
mind, neither true nor false,
ii. 137, § 3.

As referred to other men's
ideas, or to real existence,
or to real essences, may be
true or false, ibid. § 4, 5.

Reason of such reference, ii.
138, 139, § 6, 7, 8.

Simple ideas referred to other
men's ideas, least apt to be
false, ii. 139, § 9.

Complex ones, in this respect,
more apt to be false, espe-
cially those of mixed modes,
ii. 140, § 10.

Simple ideas, referred to exist-
ence, are all true, ii. 141,
§ 14: ii. 143, § 16.

Though they should be dif-
ferent in different men, ii.
142, § 15.

Complex ideas of modes are all
true, ii. 143, 144, § J7.

Of substances when false, ii.
146, §21, &c.

When right, or wrong, ii. 148,
§ 26.

That we are incapable of, ii.

373, 374, §23.
That we cannot attain, because
of their remoteness, iL 375,
§24.

Because of their minuteness.

ii. 376, ,25.

Simple have a real conformity
to things, ii. 385, § 4.

And all others, bat of sub-
stances, iL 386, § 5.

Simple cannot be got by de-
finitions of words, ii. 190,
§ 11.

But only brexperience, ii. 193,
k 14.

Of mixed modes, why most
compounded, iL 204, § 13.

Specific, of mixed modes, how
at first made: instance in
kinneah and niooph, ii. 239,
240, * 44, 45.

Of substances: instance in
zabab, ii. 241,242, § 46,47.

Simple ideas and modes have
all abstract, as well a* con-
crete, names, ii. 249, § 2.

Of substances, hare scarce any
abstract names, ibid.

Different in different men,
ii. 258, § 13.
Our ideas, almost all relative,

i. 237, S3-

Particular are first in the mind,

ii. 255, § 9.

General are imperfect, ii. 255,
§9!

How positive ideas may be from
privative causes, i. 118, § 4.

The use of this term not dan-
gerous, i. 7, &c- It is fitter
than the word notion, i. 8.
Other words as liable to be
abused as this, i. 9. Yet it is
condemned, both as new,
and not new, i. 11. The
same with notion, sense,
meaning, &c. ii. 313.
Identical propositions teach no-
thing, Hi. 43, § 2.
Identity, not an innate idea, i.
58, 59, § 3, 4, 5.

And diversity, ii. 47, S !•

Of a plant, mherein it consists,

ii. 50, § 4.
Of animals, ii. 50, 51, § 5.
Of a man, iL 51, i 6: ii. 52, § 8.
Unity of substance does not

always make the same

identity, ii. 52, % 7.
Personal identity, ii. 55, § 9.
Depends on the same con-
sciousness, ibid. § 10.
Continued existence makes

identity, ii. 71, § 29.
And diversity, in ideas, the

first perception of the mind,

ii. 309, § 4.
Idiots and madmen, i. 150, S 12,

13.

Ignorance, our ignorance in-
finitely exceeds our know-
ledge, ii. 373, § 22.
Causes of ignorance, ii. 373,
374, § 23.

1. For want of ideas, ibid.

2. For want of a discoverable
connexion between the ideas
we have, ii. 379, § 28.

3. For want of tracing the
ideas we have, ii. 381, § 30.

Illation, what, iii. 114, § 2.

Immensity, i. 158, $ 4.

How this idea is got, i. 209, § 3.

Immoralities, of whole nations,
i. 40—42, § 9, 10.

Immortality, not annexed to any
shaped ii. 393, § 15.

Impenetrability, i. 105, 106, § 1.

Imposition of opinions unreason-
able, iii. 103, §4-

Impossible est idem esseet non
esse, not the first thing
known, i. 30, § 25.

Impossibility, not an innate idea,
i. 58, §3.

Impression on the mind, what,
i. 15, § 5.

Inadequate ideas, ii. 112, § 1.

Incompatibility, how far know-
able, ii. 365, § 15.

Individuations principium, is
existence, ii. 49, § 3.

« EdellinenJatka »