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island is vested with the management of its own local affairs, instead of being attached as a dependency to Nova Scotia, from which Cape Breton Isle is now struggling to get free.

Mr. D. Stewart informs me that he travelled 20,000 miles in North America in search of land, and, on the point of returning home, without making any particular purchase, he visited Prince Edward's Island, when he was so much attracted by the pastoral beauty of the scenery, favourable locality of the island, the fertility of the soil, and the healthiness of the climate, that he instantly made large purchases of land there. Mr. Stewart being a very extensive land surveyor in the United Kingdom, may well be supposed to be a good judge on this subject.

The present mode of obtaining land in Prince Edward's Island is, either by lease for a long term of years at ls. to 1s. 6d. per acre per annum-one or more years free, then 3d. per acre, and increasing yearly at that rate to full rent; or by purchase at from 10s. to 20s. and upward per acre. This is to be understood of woodland that is wholly unimproved. Some proprietors have had farms fall into hand with more or less of cleared land on them : these of course are let or sold at an advanced sum, but commonly for less than the cost of clearing. Emigrants who might not choose to sit down on a wood farm, would have many opportunities of purchasing the leasehold or freehold, and improvements of partly cleared farms; and it would be wise in those possessing the means to do so.

The situation of the landed proprietors is different

NECESSITY OF CO-OPERATION.

221

from that of any other colony in North America, inasmuch as they are for the greater part an absentee proprietory. It is to be hoped, however, that the efforts now making by the Messrs. Stewart, of Great Russell-street, and other large land owners in the colony, for directing public attention to it in England, will be attended with happy results. Instead of striving to get the colony attached to Nova Scotia, which I trust the Government at home do not contemplate, I would recommend the proprietors to do all in their power to preserve harmony between the different branches of the legislature, by the exercise of a little more Christian charity towards each other. I perfectly agree with the House of Assembly, as to the propriety of commuting the quit-rents for a moderate land tax on all lands, cultivated and uncultivated. It would be quite unfair to assess the former, and leave the latter to be not only a detri.. ment to the country, but also a profit to those who will neither settle or till them, nor sell them; such profit being at the expense of those who do. It would be well, perhaps, to except such lands as are not fit for tillage, and then there could be no excuse for proprietors leaving large tracts of waste territory in the midst of cultivated districts.

When a proprietor finds that he is obliged to pay an annual tax, however small, on what brings him in no return, he will relieve himself of the burthen, either by selling the land, or else by making it pay at least the amount of the tax levied. Whichever course he may pursue will be advantageous to the colony. I do think that if Mr. Lawrence Sullivan, and other

large proprietors, were to come to a settlement, and have a moderate land tax assessed, and then sub-let their lands on long leases or quit-rents', it would be the best

way

of serving themselves and the colony; while the introduction of superior breeds of cattlethe establishment of fairs—the formation of agri. cultural associations and the occasional visit of the proprietors to the island, would be productive of great benefit, and tend to raise Prince Edward's Island to that high station as a colony (capable of containing half a million of souls) to which its excellent position, soil, and climate so eminently entitle it.

See large edition for table of quit-rents.

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