The British Essayists;: Lounger

Etukansi
J. Johnson, J. Nichols and son, R. Baldwin, F. and C. Rivington, W. Otridge and son, W.J. and J. Richardson, A. Strahan, R. Faulder, ... [and 40 others], 1807
 

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Sivu 192 - I care not, fortune, what you me deny : You cannot rob me of free nature's grace ; You cannot shut the windows of the sky, Through which Aurora shows her brightening face ; You cannot bar my constant feet to trace The woods and lawns, by living stream, at eve Let health my nerves and finer fibres brace, And I their toys to the great children leave : Of fancy, reason, virtue, nought can me bereave.
Sivu 228 - Though gods assembled grace his tow'ring height, Than what more humble mountains offer here, Where, in their blessings, all those gods appear. See Pan with flocks, with fruits Pomona crown'd, Here blushing Flora paints th...
Sivu 229 - He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as a man of genius; he looks round on Nature and on life with the eye which Nature bestows only on a poet; the eye that distinguishes, in every thing presented to its view, whatever there is on which imagination cau delight to be detained, and with a mind that at once comprehends the vast, and attends to the minute.
Sivu 140 - L'empire de la femme est un empire de douceur, d'adresse et de complaisance; ses ordres sont des caresses, ses menaces sont des pleurs.
Sivu 229 - As a writer, he is entitled to one praise of the highest kind ; his mode of thinking, and of expressing his thoughts, is original. His blank verse is no more the blank verse of Milton, or of any other poet, than the rhymes of Prior are the rhymes of Cowley. His numbers, his pauses, his diction, are of his own growth, without transcription, without imitation. He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as a man of genius...
Sivu 230 - Nature bestows only on a poet ; the eye that distinguishes in every thing presented to its view, whatever there is on which imagination can delight to be detained, and with a mind that at once comprehends the vast, and attends to the minute. The reader of the " Seasons" wonders that he never saw before what Thomson shows him, and that he never yet has felt what Thomson impresses.
Sivu 13 - Whitlocke talks of one Milton, as he calls him, a blind man, who was employed in translating a treaty with Sweden into Latin.
Sivu 15 - GET thee a place, for I must be idle," says Hamlet to Horatio at the play. It is often so with me at public places : I am more employed in attending to the spectators, than to the entertainment ; a practice which, in the present state of some of our entertainments, I frequently find very convenient. In me, however, it is an indolent, quiet sort of indulgence, which, if it affords some amusement to myself, does not disturb that of any other body. At an assembly at which I happened to be present a...
Sivu 226 - A god impels the winds. A god pours out the rivers. Grapes are the gift of Bacchus. Ceres presides over the harvest. Orchards are the care of Pomona. Does a shepherd sound his reed on the summit of a mountain, it is Pan, who, with his pastoral pipe, returns the amorous lay. When the...
Sivu 177 - ... circumstances. This he would often mention as an encouragement to early matrimony, and used to say, that he never had a child born that Providence did not send some increase of income to provide for the increase of his household.

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