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Between each Bracket, both upper and lower, is a richly ornamented Ceiling of a combined floral and geometrical pattern, the Chrysanthemum being taken as the type of its ornament.

The Roof, (the rafters of which are of wrought Tee iron,) is covered with zinc, in curved tiles, and is surmounted by an elaborately carved Cresting. The Fascia and pendent ornament beneath the Balcony, and overhanging the lower roof, is of a quaint and effective design.

One of the most important and novel features of this work is the Railing which surrounds the entire building. This is 4 feet 6 inches high, and is entirely of wrought iron. The Sunflower has been taken as the type of its ornament. The Railing is divided into 72 panels, each of which is occupied by a Sunflower 3 feet 6 inches high, the flower itself being 11 inches in diameter, having carefully veined leaves, six in number to each flower.

The appearance of this Railing is of a most striking and unusual character, and as a piece of workmanship it is believed to be unrivalled of its kind.

Want of time has prevented the Pavilion being finished in its entirety, but it is intended, when completed, to have a rich ceiling to the upper and lower compartments composed of cast iron Panels in bas-relief, and the upper floor will be approached by an ornamental Staircase in cast-iron. Whilst upon exhibition at Philadelphia,

the Ceilings and the upper portion of the walls of the Interior will be covered by a silken cloth having rich embroidery upon it, specially designed by Mr. Jeckyll, and executed at the Royal School of Art Needlework. In this the Horse Chestnut, Cranes, and various Birds form the elements of decoration.

Cooper & Holt, 48, 49, 50, Bunhill Row, London, E.C. The Furniture in the house of the British Commission, in Fairmount Park, comprising Sideboards, Dining and other Tables; a Patent Reversible Oak Billiard and Dining Table and Cue Stand; Stuffed Lounges, Settees, and Chairs; the Cabinets, the Carved Oak and Walnut Mantel Pieces and fittings for the Offices and Staff Quarters have been also supplied by this Firm.

Daniell, A. B., & Son, Manufacturers of China and every description of Earthenware, by Special Appointment to Her Majesty, 46, Wigmore Street, London, W. Dinner, Dessert, Tea and Coffee Services, "Fine Art" Porcelain, Pottery, and Ornamental Vases, for decoration of the apartments, Toilette Services, &c., all supplied for the use of the Executive at British Commission House and Staff Quarters in Fairmount Park.

Eastwood & Co., Limited, Belvedere Road, Lambeth, London, S.E. Lime, Cement, and Brick Manufacturers and Merchants, Makers also of Portland Cement (from the Medway earth and grey chalk). Red and Blue Broseley Roofing Tiles, Red Terra-Cotta Chimney Shafts, as supplied for the British Executive Staff Quarters. Staffordshire Blue Chequered Pavements and Blue Bricks. White Glazed Bricks and Tiles. Adamantine and other Stable Clinkers. Sanitary Glazed and Drain Pipes. Red and White Suffolk Facing Bricks. Shoebury Malm Bricks. Stourbridge, Newcastle, and Welsh Fire Bricks, Lumps, and Tiles. Moulded Bricks of all Patterns. Red Yorkshire Paving and Roofing Tiles. Roofing Slates. Roman and Parian Cement. Bristol Tempered Lime, and all descriptions of Builders Goods.

Elkington & Co., Manufacturing Silversmiths, and the Original Patentees of the Electro-Plate, 22, Regent Street, and 45, Moorgate Street, London; 25, Church Street, Liverpool; St. Anne's Square, Manchester; Manufactory and Show Rooms, Newhall Street, Birmingham.

Decorative Table Plate relieved with Electro Gold and Oxydised Silver, Gold and Silver Damascened

Works of Art. Electro-type fac-simile reproductions. Contributed for use and for decorative purposes at the British Staff Quarters.

Galloway, W. & J., & Sons, Engineers, Manchester.

THREE "GALLOWAY" STEAM BOILERS.

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SECTION OF THE "GALLOWAY" BOILER FLUE AT BACK END, SHOWING (1875) PATENTED IMPROVEMENTS.

These Boilers are contributed by the makers at the request of the Executive Commissioners for the British Section, to enable them to exhibit a type and form of Steam Boiler of acknowledged excellence, and which is extensively used in Great Britain; and at the same time to supply steam to the engines in connection with the British Section.

This form of boiler is known as the "Galloway Boiler," and has been in use in England for upwards of 25 years. It is regarded as the most economical and efficient steam generator now made, having rapidly superseded the ordinary Cornish plain cylindrical boiler, with one circular flue running from end to end, and the Lancashire boiler, which is of a similar description, but having two flues instead of one.

The construction of the "Galloway Boiler" will be readily understood by examining the model which is placed in the British boiler house. It will be seen that in the cylindrical shell is placed an internal flue consisting of two furnaces at the front end, united into one back flue of an irregular oval form.

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This flue constitutes the chief feature in the "Galloway Boiler," and in it are placed 33 conical water tubes, each 10in. diameter at the top or large end, and 54in. diameter at the lower end, fixed in an upright position, in such a way as to support the flue, and to intercept and break up the flame and heated gases, when passing from the fire-grate or furnaces to the chimney. Along the sides of the flues there are also placed several wrought iron stops or bafflers, which deflect the currents of heated air and cause them to impinge against the tubes, so as to absorb all the available heat possible.

The conical water pipes, or "Galloway Tubes" as they are now generally called, present a direct heating surface to the action of the flame, &c., this effects a great saving of fuel; they also promote rapid circulation of water, and thereby maintain that uniform temperature which is so essential to the durability and safety of all steam boilers. Unequal expansion or contraction is avoided, and its attendant evils; undue strains and eventual rupture.

An important improvement has just been effected in the construction of the original Galloway boiler, which the makers have patented, and which is introduced in the three boilers now exhibited.

This improvement consists in the arching of the bottom part of the oval back flue, by means of which greater facilities are furnished for cleaning and examining the lower part of boiler when required.

A further advantage is also obtained by having the conical tubes all radiating from one centre, they are consequently one uniform length, and are interchangeable.

The three boilers here shown are each 28ft. long by 7ft. diameter, and are made suitable for an ordinary working pressure of 75 lbs. to the square inch. The shell or casing is made of Bessemer steel plates -in thick, double riveted in the longitudinal seams. Each of these boilers is capable of supplying steam to drive a condensing engine indicating 300 horse-power.

The two furnaces are each 2ft. 9 in. diameter by 7ft. 6in. long, made of steel plates in three rings, flanged and riveted together so as to prevent any seam or rivet heads being exposed to the action of the fire. The mountings or boiler fittings include all the modern and most approved appliances for the safe and economical working of the boilers, as now worked in England, viz. :—

"GALLOWAY" TUBE.

Wrought iron furnace-frames and doors, fitted with slides and baffle plates, to regulate the admission of air to the combustion chamber, and to prevent smoke. Fusible plugs are also placed in the crown of each furnace as a safe-guard against overheating, in case the water within the boiler should be reduced below the safe line of working.

Wrought iron solid welded manhole, Water Gauges in duplicate, Steam Pressure Gauge, Check Feed Valve, Brass Blow-off Cock, Scum Apparatus, for collecting and discharging any impurities in the water within the boiler, Steam Junction Valve, Dead Weight Safety Valve, Lever Safety Valve, and low water and high steam Alarm Whistles, &c.

With these boilers the makers also exhibit three "Galloway" or Cone Tubes similar to those fixed in the oval flues, but which are now being very largely intro duced into both single and double flued boilers, a model of which is also exhibited.

These tubes are welded and flanged from one plate, and can be formed to suit any size of flue or combustion chamber.

When applied to single or double flued boilers they are generally fixed crosswise, s as to present as large and direct a heating surface as possible to the flame and heate gases passing through the boiler.

These tubes not only promote a saving of fuel ranging from 15 to 20 per cent

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fut they strengthen the flue in such a manner as to render hooping with angle or tee iron unnecessary, the circulation of water is also promoted, and unequal expansion prevented.

These tubes are made by special machinery, and can be supplied whenever necessary, at two or three days notice.

The manufacture of these tubes and boilers by Messrs. Galloway and Sons has now been carried on for many years, and their establishments in Manchester bear testimony to the increasing demand which is made for this class of work. With their present appliances many thousand tubes, and from 300 to 400 boilers per year, are made and dispatched to all parts of the world.

Gardner & Sons, 453 & 454, Strand, 3 & 4, Duncannon Street, London. LAMPS FOR DOMESTIC PURPOSES.— These lamps are all arranged to burn petroleum on Messrs. Gardner's improved duplex [doubled wick] principle, which improves their illuminating power and makes it possible to get rid of the old unsightly globe. In the offices of the British Commission are patterns based on mediæval models, reproduced in brass repoussé and polished, with twisted serpentine columns, crystal and ruby glass, which are combinations not attempted before. There are also hanging lamps on the same principle, some of which are especially constructed for office use.

The barracks and other buildings belonging to the British Commission are lighted by lamps on the same principle adapted to their various purposes.

In Messrs. Gardner's cases are lamps of this description in designs executed in silver ard gilt plate, which are reproductions of classic, renaissance, and Indian styles. In these cases also are reproductions of old

. English candlesticks.

READING OR STUDY LAMPS.-In electro plate, but made also in brass or bronze. Burn colza or any vegetable oil, and are especially recommended on account of their convenient form and soft light. They are also made to burn paraffin and the heavy mineral oils known as mineral sperm.

SURGICAL LAMPS.—Used in the Franco-Prussian War.

SHIP Caern LAMPS.-New designs of cabin wall lamps on the duplex principle in electro-plate and in b123s, &c. A section of one of the lamps supplied to H.M.S. “ Alert" and " Discovery” forming the Arctic Expedition of 1875. This is a strong lamp, riveted together, and fitted with a double case of copper, the tertening space being filled with felt to prevent the coagulation of oil and to permit the consumption of fat (7 tallow if needed. The flame is three inches high and equals 26 candles. Silver Medal awarded, Paris Maritime Exhibition, 1875.

THE SOLDIERS LAMP.—Designed for and exhibited by permission of H.M.'s Indian Government. Can be ad as a hand lantern, or suspended or fastened to a tent pole. Will burn steadily under a heavy wind, and

* ventilation is not liable to become clogged as in out-door lamps where gauze is used as a protector. The 'azing is common window glass, which in case of breakage can be easily replaced.

The TRAVELLING LAMP.-Burns mineral or colza oil and contains one week supply, will keep steady in -"y draught; is arranged as a suspending or table lamp and fits in a small and very light tin case, without ; acking

PATENT STIRRUP LAMP.–For use by exploring parties, or on rough bridle paths. TRAVELLING READING LAMP.—For use in private cabins, railway compartments, &c. Made with patent t-acting fastenings. Pocket size. SHIP or MILITARY BAND LAMP.— Adapted for the circular band stands and constructed to light two music *ds at once.

This flue constitutes the chief feature in the "Galloway Boiler," and in it are placed 33 conical water tubes, each 10in. diameter at the top or large end, and 54in. diameter at the lower end, fixed in an upright position, in such a way as to support the flue, and to intercept and break up the flame and heated gases, when passing from the fire-grate or furnaces to the chimney. Along the sides of the flues there are also placed several wrought iron stops or bafflers, which deflect the currents of heated air and cause them to impinge against the tubes, so as to absorb all the available heat possible.

The conical water pipes, or "Galloway Tubes" as they are now generally called, present a direct heating surface to the action of the flame, &c., this effects a great saving of fuel; they also promote rapid circulation of water, and thereby maintain that uniform temperature which is so essential to the durability and safety of all steam boilers. Unequal expansion or contraction is avoided, and its attendant evils; undue strains and eventual rupture.

An important improvement has just been effected in the construction of the original Galloway boiler, which the makers have patented, and which is introduced in the three boilers now exhibited.

This improvement consists in the arching of the bottom part of the oval back flue, by means of which greater facilities are furnished for cleaning and examining the lower part of boiler when required.

A further advantage is also obtained by having the conical tubes all radiating from one centre, they are consequently one uniform length, and are interchangeable.

The three boilers here shown are each 28ft. long by 7ft. diameter, and are made suitable for an ordinary working pressure of 75 lbs. to the square inch. The shell or casing is made of Bessemer steel plates -in. thick, double riveted in the longitudinal seams. Each of these boilers is capable of supplying steam to drive a condensing engine indicating 300 horse-power.

The two furnaces are each 2ft. 9 in. diameter by 7ft. 6in. long, made of steel plates in three rings, flanged and riveted together so as to prevent any seam or rivet heads being exposed to the action of the fire. The mountings or boiler fittings include all the modern and most approved appliances for the safe and economical working of the boilers, as now worked in England, viz. :

"GALLOWAY" TUBE.

Wrought iron furnace-frames and doors, fitted with slides and baffle plates, to re-, gulate the admission of air to the combustion chamber, and to prevent smoke. Fusible plugs are also placed in the crown of each furnace as a safe-guard against overheating, in case the water within the boiler should be reduced below the safe line of working.

Wrought iron solid welded manhole, Water Gauges in duplicate, Steam Pressure Gauge, Check Feed Valve, Brass Blow-off Cock, Scum Apparatus, for collecting and discharging any impurities in the water within the boiler, Steam Junction Valve, Dead Weight Safety Valve, Lever Safety Valve, and low water and high steam Alarm Whistles, &c.

With these boilers the makers also exhibit three " Galloway" or Cone Tubes similar to those fixed in the oval flues, but which are now being very largely intro duced into both single and double flued boilers, a model of which is also exhibited.

These tubes are welded and flanged from one plate, and can be formed to suit any size of flue or combustion chamber.

When applied to single or double flued boilers they are generally fixed crosswise, s as to present as large and direct a heating surface as possible to the flame and he gases passing through the boiler.

These tubes not only promote a saving of fuel ranging f

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