Principles of Elocution: Containing Numerous Rules, Observations, and Exercises, on Pronunciation, Pauses, Inflections, Accent, and Emphasis; Also Copious Extracts in Prose and Poetry, Calculated to Assist the Teacher, and to Improve the Pupil in Reading and Recitation

Etukansi
Oliver & Boyd, 1819 - 436 sivua
 

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Sisältö

Lines written on visiting a Scene in Argyleshire
26
Part of a Poem on the Fear of God
27
The last Speech of Cyrus
28
A Ladys salutation to her Garden in the Country
29
Rules for the English
30
Davids Trust in God
31
The Day of Judgment
32
The Benedicite Paraphrased
33
The Crow and the other Birds
34
The two Owls and the Sparrow
35
Courage in Poverty
36
Prologue to Cato
37
Epilogue by Mr Garrick
38
Awful Description of the Deities engaged in Combat
39
Direct Periods commencing with Participles
40
Harmony of Expression
41
On Man
42
Universal Order
43
SelfKnowledge
44
Vice and Virtue
45
On the Plain of Marathon
46
On the present State of Athens
47
Exclamation
48
The Battle of Vittoria
49
The Aspect of Greece
50
The Turkish Lady
51
A Ship Sinking
52
Battle of the Baltic
53
The Fate of Macgregor
54
The Temple of Fame
55
From the Field of Waterloo
56
Compound Concluding Series
57
Exercises on the Series Page
61
Transposition of Accent
67
Double Emphasis
73
The Nominative and the Verb Rule 1
79
Words in Opposition Rule XIV
85
The Interview of Rasselas c with the Hermit
89
On the Improvement of Time
91
Patience Recommended
93
The Planetary and Terrestrial Worlds
96
The Italian Opera
98
Westminster Abbey
101
On Consistency in Behaviour
103
Interview between an Old Major and a Young Officer
105
On Religion
106
Remarks on the Swiftness of Time
107
On Public Preaching
109
How a Modern Lady of Fashion Disposes of her Time
110
On Pronunciation or Delivery
113
Discontent the common Lot of all Mankind
114
The Funeral of Mr Betterton
117
The Folly of misspending Time
119
The Vision of Sir Isaac Bickerstaff
120
Youth and Old Age
122
The Poor weep unheeded
123
The Story of a Disabled Soldier
124
The Business and Qualifications of a Poet
128
Remarks on some of the best Poets
130
On the Iliad of Homer
133
On the Odyssey of Homer
134
On the Beauties of Virgil
135
On the comparative Merit of Homer and Virgil
136
On Human Grandeur
137
Ethelgar A Saxon Poem
138
Kenrick Translated from the Saxon
141
Hard Words Defended
143
The Difficulty of Conquering Habit
146
On Cruelty to inferior Animals
147
Effects of Sympathy in the Distresses of Others
149
On the Love of Life
150
On the Dignity of Human Nature
151
Fame a commendable Passion
152
The present Life to be considered only as it may conduce to the Happiness of a future one
154
42
156
The Impudent and the Absurd 159
159
On Grieving for the Dead
160
On Remorse
164
Asem An Eastern Tale
165
On the English Clergy and Popular Preachers
167
On Universal Benevolence
169
On the Advantages of a well cultivated Mind
173
On the Formation of Language
176
On the Sublime in Writing
179
HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL EXTRACTS 1 Our natural Fondness for History and its true Use
183
On Biography
184
Character of Queen Elizabeth
186
Character of Mr Pitt
188
The Siege of Quebec and the Death of General Wolfe
189
Maria Part I
201
Maria Part II
203
SPECIMENS OF PULPIT ELOQUENCE 1 True Pleasure Defined
205
Religion never to be treated with Levity
206
The Condition of the Wicked
207
Religious Knowledge a Source of Consolation
209
On the Enlargement of our Intellectual Powers
211
On a Future State
213
On the Works and Attributes of the Almighty
214
On the Beauties of Nature
215
Obedience to the Commandments of God will be rewarded216
216
The Birth of the Saviour announced
217
The Truth frees us from the Slavish Fear of Death
218
On the Hope of Immortality
219
The Departed Spirits of the Just are Spectators of our Conduct on Earth
220
The Death of Christ
222
On the General Fast 1803
223
The Promises of Religion to the Young
225
On Autumn
227
SPECIMENS OF MODERN ELOQUENCE
229
SPECIMENS OF ANCIENT ELOQUENCE
251
Hannibal to his Soldiers
259
POETRY
265
BLANK VERSE
267
The Female Exile
271
Hope the Friend of the Brave
278
On True Dignity
284
Against Suicide 2 Various Modes of Punishment 3 The Ideas of the Divine Mind
307
Reaso
311
312
313
Dougla
323
Character of Teribazus
346
A Seatonian Prize Poem
348
On the Importance of Time to Man
350
On Death
351
On the Wonders of Redemption
354
Lochiels Warning
356
Vanoc and Valens
358
Corin and Emmas Hospitality
361
Coriolanus and Aufidius
363
Lady Randolph and Douglas
366
Albertos Exculpation
368
Alfred and Devon
371
The Quarrel of Brutus and Cassius
372
Orestes delivering his Embassy to Pyrrhus
376
Glenalvon and Norval
378
Hector and Andromache
381
12 Catos Senate
382
Speech of Henry V at the Siege of Harfleur
385
Marcelluss Speech to the Mob
386
Richmond encouraging his Soldiers
387
Henry V s Speech at Agincourt
388
Speech of Edward the Black Prince
389
How Douglas learned the Art of War
390
Othellos Apology
392
Cassius against Cæsar
393
Alfreds Address to the Saxon Troops
395
Leonidas offering to defend the Pass of Thermopylæ
396
Oration in Praise of Coriolanus
397
The Old English Lion
398
The Passions
399
Alexanders Feast
402
Speech of Rolla
405
Brutuss Harangue on the Death of Cæsar
406
Osmonds Dream
407
Hamlets Advice to the Players
409
Lady Randolphs Soliloquy Page 410 2 Douglass Soliloquy in the Wood
410
Catos Soliloquy on the Immortality of the Soul
411
Hamlets Soliloquy on Death
412
Hamlets Soliloquy on his Mothers Marriage
413
Macbeths Soliloquy before murdering Duncan
414
COMIC EXTRACTS 1 Prologue to the Farce of the Apprentice
415
Lodgings for Single Gentlemen
416
Toby Tosspot
418
The Chameleon
420
The Newcastle Apothecary
421
THE PASSIONS 1 Cheerfulness
425
Raillery
426
Love
427
Pity
428
Hatred
429
Revenge
430
Fear and Terror
431
Remorse
432
Surprise
433
Pride
434
Boasting
435
Malice
436

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Suositut otteet

Sivu 406 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause ; and be silent that you may hear : believe me for mine honour; and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom; and awake your senses that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his.
Sivu 413 - With a bare bodkin ? who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of ? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all...
Sivu 393 - My story being done, She gave me for my pains a world of sighs : She swore, — in faith, 'twas strange, 'twas passing strange ; 'Twas pitiful, 'twas wondrous pitiful: She wish'd she had not heard it ; yet she wish'd That heaven had made her such a man...
Sivu 395 - Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods! When went there by an age, since the great flood, But it was fam'd with more than with one man?
Sivu 308 - The sound must seem an echo to the sense : Soft is the strain when Zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse, rough verse should like the torrent roar : When Ajax strives some rock's vast weight to throw, The line too labors, and the words move slow: Not so, when swift Camilla scours the plain, Flies o'er th' unbending corn, and skims along the main.
Sivu 423 - Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile, Hath not old custom made this life more sweet Than that of painted pomp? Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, — The seasons...
Sivu 385 - Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead. In peace there's nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility: But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger; Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood.
Sivu 412 - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
Sivu 407 - As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him; but, as he was ambitious, I slew him.
Sivu 129 - The business of a poet," said Imlac, "is to examine, not the individual, but the species ; to remark general properties and large appearances ; he does not number the streaks of the tulip, or describe the different shades in the verdure of the forest.

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