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Teokset Teokset 1 - 10 / 165 haulle I may therefore conclude, that the passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden....
" I may therefore conclude, that the passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly... "
The Spectator - Sivu 312
muokkaaja - 1810
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Essays: On the Nature and Immutability of Truth, in Opposition to ..., Nide 2

James Beattie - 1776
...but fudden glory arifing from " fome fudden conception of fome emi" nency in ourfelves by comparifon with *' the infirmity of others, or with our own " formerly. For men (continues he) laugh " at the follies of themfelves paft, when they " come fuddenly to remembrance,...

The Spectator. ...

1789
...but fudden glory arifmg from fome ' fudden conception of fome eminency in our' felves, by comparifon with the infirmity of ' others, or with our own formerly : for men ' Laugh at the follies of themfelves paft, when ' they come fuddenly to remembrance, except ' they bring with them any prefcnt...

The Philosophy of Rhetoric, Nide 1

George Campbell - 1801
...exaniuicj. ~ 'i defined Uughtff " a sodden glory, arising from-a sud" den conception of some eminency in ourselves,, by " comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our " own, formerly *." This account is, J acknowledge, incompatible with that given in the preceding pages, and, in ray...

The Spectator in miniature: being a collection of the principle ..., Nide 1

rev Francis Prevost - 1808
...nothing else hut sndden glory, arising from some sadden conception of some eminency in ourselves, hy comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly: for men langh at the follies of themselves past, when they come snddenly to rememhrance, except they hring...

Essays: on the Nature and Immutability of Truth, in Opposition to ..., Nide 6

James Beattie - 1809
...Hobbes) is nothing else, but sudden glory " arising from some sudden conception of some " eminency in ourselves by comparison with " the infirmity of others, or with our own for" merly. For men (continues he) laugh at the " follies of themselves past, when they come * Tacitus,...

The Intellectual repository for the New Church. (July/Sept. 1817 ...

1852
...Hobbes, who says that this passion is " A sudden glory arising from a sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of...past, when they come suddenly to remembrance, except when they bring with them dishonour." And Akenside says that laughter arises when — " some incongruous...

Lectures on the Philosophy of the Human Mind, Nide 2

Thomas Brown - 1822
...that Hobbes defines laughter to be " a sudden glory, arising from a sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly," — for we laugh as readily at some brilliant conception of wit, where there are no infirmities of others displayed,...

Laconics; or, The best words of the best authors [ed. by J. Timbs]. 1st Amer. ed

Laconics - 1829
...passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves by comparison with the infirmity of others,...except they bring with them any present dishonour. — Hobbes. DCCCCVH. There are four good mothers, of whom are often born four unhappy daughters; truth...

Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors, Nide 1

John Timbs - 1829
...passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves by comparison with the infirmity of others,...except they bring with them any present dishonour. — Hobbes. DCCCCVII. There are four good mothers, of whom are often born four unhappy daughters; truth...

The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of Science, Art ..., Nide 8

Thomas Curtis - 1829
...of laughter is nothing else but a sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly. Hobbet. Where men cannot arrive to any eminency of estate, yet religion makes a compensation, by teaching...




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