The Wisdom of the Chinese: Their Philosophy in Sayings and Proverbs

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Bretano's, 1920 - 207 sivua
 

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Sivu 95 - He who knows others is clever, but he who knows himself is enlightened. He who overcomes others is strong, but he who overcomes himself is mightier still.
Sivu 63 - A man should say, I am not concerned that I have no place, I am concerned how I may fit myself for one. I am not concerned that I am not known, I seek to be worthy to be known.
Sivu 89 - It is the Way of Heaven to take from those who have too much, and give to those who have too little.
Sivu 70 - Seek and you will find them. Neglect and you will lose them.' Men differ from one another in regard to them — some as much again as others, some five times as much, and some to an incalculable amount. It is because they cannot carry out fully their natural powers.
Sivu 86 - Man takes his law from the Earth ; the Earth takes its law from Heaven ; Heaven takes its law from the Tao. The law of the Tao is its being what it is.
Sivu 128 - The people have certain natural instincts : — to weave and clothe themselves, to till and feed themselves. These are common to all humanity, and all are agreed thereon.
Sivu 127 - You cannot speak of ocean to a well-frog, the creature of a narrower sphere. You cannot speak of ice to a summer insect, a creature of a season. You cannot speak of Tao to a pedagogue; his scope is too restricted. But now that you have emerged from your narrow sphere and have seen the great ocean, you know your own insignificance, and I can speak to you of great principles.
Sivu 124 - The objective emanates from the subjective; the subjective is consequent upon the objective. This is the Alternation Theory." Nevertheless, when one is born, the other dies. When one is possible, the other is impossible. When one is affirmative, the other is negative. Which being the case, the true Sage rejects all distinctions of this and that.
Sivu 127 - ... that all the beauty of the earth was gathered to himself. Down with the stream he journeyed east, until he reached the ocean. There, looking eastwards and seeing no limit to its waves, his countenance changed. And as he gazed over the expanse, he sighed and said to the Spirit of the Ocean, ' A vulgar proverb says, that he who has heard but part of the truth thinks no one equal to himself. And such a one am I.
Sivu 115 - I would also be good, in order to make them good. With the faithful I would keep faith; with the unfaithful I would also keep faith, in order that they may become faithful.

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