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by sections 3 and 4 of the act above referred to in the case of States and Territories. 2. It is forbidden to make issues to States and Territories in excess of the amount to their credit under the provisions of section 1661, Revised Statutes, as amended by the above act. 3. Any regulations established hitherto which in any way conflict with

these are hereby revoked. BENJ. HARRISON

AMENDMENT OF CIVIL-SERVICE RULES.

MAY 4, 1889.

Special Departmental Rule No. 1 is hereby amended by including among the places excepted from examination thereunder in section 2 the following: “custodian of dies, rolls, and plates at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, two subcustodians, keeper of the vault, and distributer of stock.”

As amended so much of that section as relates to the office of the Secretary of the Treasury will read:

2. In the Department of the Treasury, in the office of the Secretary: Government

actuary, inspector of furniture, custodian of dies, rolls, and plates at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, two subcustodians, keeper of the vault, and distributer

of stock. BENJ. HARRISON.

AMENDMENTS OF CIVIL-SERVICE RULES.

Executive MANsion, May 27, 1889. Departmental Rule VIII is hereby amended as follows: At the end of section I insert an additional clause, as follows:

(d) From the office of the President of the United States, after two years' continuous service therein immediately preceding the transfer, to any place in the classified service without examination, upon the requisition of the head of the Department to which the transfer is to be made and the certification of the Commission.

In section 2, line 1, after the word “authorized,” insert the following:

“except as provided in section 1, clause (d).” BENJ. HARRISON.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
EXECUTIVE ORDER.

Executive MANsion, May 29, 1889. It is hereby ordered, That the several Executive Departments and the Government Printing Office be closed on Thursday, the 3oth instant, to enable the employees to participate in the decoration of the graves of the

soldiers who fell during the rebellion. BENJ. HARRISON,

Executive MANsion, June 7, 1889.

In November, 1862, President Lincoln quoted the words of Washington to sustain his own views, and announced in a general order that—

The President, Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy, desires and enjoins the orderly observance of the Sabbath by the officers and men in the military and naval service. The importance for man and beast of the prescribed weekly rest, the sacred rights of Christian soldiers and sailors, a becoming deference to the best sentiment of a Christian people, and a due regard for the divine will demand that Sunday labor in the Army and Navy be reduced to the measure of strict necessity.

The truth so concisely stated can not be too faithfully regarded, and the pressure to ignore it is far less now than in the midst of war. To recall the kindly and considerate spirit of the orders issued by these great men in the most trying times of our history, and to promote contentment and efficiency, the President directs that Sunday-morning inspection will be merely of the dress and general appearance, without arms; and the more complete inspection under arms, with all men present, as required in paragraph 950, Army Regulations, 1889, will take place on Saturday.

By the President: BENJ. HARRISON.

REDFIELD PROCTOR,
Secretary of War.

AMENDMENTS OF CIVIL-SERVICE RULES.

Executive MANsion, June ro, 1889.

Special Departmental Rule No. 1 is hereby amended as follows: In section 2, at the end of paragraph 1, insert the following: “foremen of laborers, skilled laborers, elevator conductors, foreman of cabinet shop, and cabinetmakers.” * So that as amended so much of section 2 as relates to the office of the Secretary of the Treasury will read: In the office of the Secretary: Government actuary, inspector of furniture, custodian of dies, rolls, and plates at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, two subcustodians, keeper of the vault, and distributer of stock, foremen of laborers, skilled laborers, elevator conductors, foreman of cabinet shop, and cabinetmakers. In section 3 strike out the last paragraph and insert in lieu thereof the following: In the Geological Survey: General assistant, executive officer, chief photographer, editor, all scientific employees of the Geological Survey officially designated as follows: Chief geologist, geologist, assistant geologist, chief paleontologist, paleontologist, and assistant paleontologist, chief chemist, chemist, assistant chemist, chief physicist, physicist, assistant physicist, chief geographer, geographer, assistant geographer, chief topographer, topographer, assistant topographer, chief hydrographer, hydrographer, assistant hydrographer, supervising engineer, engineer, assistant engineer, paleontological draftsman, chief mechanician, mechanician, assistant mech

anician. BENJ. HARRISON,

AMENDMENT OF CIVIL-SERVICE RULES.

Executive MANsion, June 18, 1889.

Departmental Rule X, Customs Rule VII, Postal Rule VII, and Railway Mail Rule VI are hereby amended by adding to each of said rules, at the end thereof, the following:

Provided, That certification may be made, subject to the other conditions of this rule, for the reinstatement of any person who served in the military or naval service of the United States in the late War of the Rebellion, and was honorably discharged therefrom, without regard to the length of time he has been separated from the

service. BENJ. HARRISON.

AMENDMENT OF CIVIL-SERVICE RULES. JULY 26, 1889. Clause (h) of section 2 of General Rule III is hereby amended by adding to that clause, at the end thereof, the following: “ or for temporary appointment for not exceeding thirty days in any part of the classified service.”

Approved: BENJ. HARRISON.

AMENDMENT OF CIVIL-SERVICE RULES.

JULY 26, 1889. Section 5 of Railway Mail Rule II is hereby amended by adding an additional clause, as follows: - (c) Printers, employed as such.

Approved: BENJ. HARRISON.

AMENDMENT OF CIVIL-SERVICE RULES.

ExecutIve MANsion, August 17, 1889. Clause 5 of Railway Mail Rule II is hereby amended by adding thereto the following clauses:

(d) Clerks employed exclusively as porters in handling mail matter in bulk, in sacks, or pouches, and not otherwise. (e) Clerks employed exclusively on steamboats.

Approved: BENJ. HARRISON.

AMENDMENT OF CIVIL-SERVICE RULES.

AUGUST 20, 1889. Clause 2 of Special Departmental Rule No. 1 is hereby amended by including among the places excepted from examination in the office of the Supervising Architect the following: “engineers and draftsmen of classes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, not exceeding ten in all: Provided, That these

ten places shall cease to be excepted places from and after June 30, 1890.” As thus amended so much of clause 2 as relates to the office of the

Supervising Architect will read as follows:

In the office of the Supervising Architect: Supervising Architect, assistant and chief clerk, confidential clerk to Supervising Architect, photographer, engineers and draftsmen of classes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, not exceeding ten in all: Provided, That these ten places shall cease to be excepted places from and after June 30, 1890.

Approved: BENJ. HARRISON.

AMENDMENT OF CIVIL-SERVICE RULES.

October 29, 1889.

Section 2 of Special Departmental Rule No. 1 is hereby amended by adding to the places excepted from examination in the Bureau of Engraving and Printing the following: “plate cleaners, transferrers, hardeners, provers, pressmen, machinists, plumbers, carpenters, and blackSmiths.”

Approved: BENJ. HARRISON.

AMENDMENTS OF CIVIL-SERVICE RULES.

Section 2 of Railway Mail Rule IV is hereby amended by substituting for clause (b) of said section the following:

(*) The Commission shall certify from the register of the State or Territory in .

which the vacancy exists the names of the three eligibles thereon having the highest averages, resident in the counties of said State or Territory through or on the borders of which the section of the road passes on which the person to be appointed is to serve, who have not been three times certified: Provided, That if there are not three eligibles resident in said counties, then certification shall be made in like manner from the counties of said State or Territory nearest to the line of said road in which there are three eligibles; or if there are not three eligibles upon the register of said State of Territory, then certification may be made from the register of any adjoining State or Territory: Provided further, That if upon the register of the State or Territory in which vacancy exists there are the names of eligibles having a claim of preference inder section 1754, Revised Statutes, the names of such eligibles shall be certified before the names of other eligibles of higher grade.

At the end of the rule add an additional section, as follows:

7. In case of public and pressing exigency demanding the immediate employment of experienced railway mail clerks who can not be at once supplied in the manner provided for in section 2 of this rule, or by transfer under Rule V, or reappointment under Rule VI, there may be employed, without examination or certification, under such regulations as the Postmaster-General may prescribe, for a period not to exceed thirty days, which, with the consent of the Commission, may be extended to sixty days, any persons who have been in the railway mail service, who have the requisite knowledge and experience, who may be available. Every such employment and the reasons therefor shall be at once reported to the Commission.

Approved, November 1, 1889.

BENJ. HARRISON. MP-voi, vii.1—6

AMENDMENT OF CIVIL-SERVICE RULES.

Special Customs Rule No. 1 is hereby amended by adding to the places excepted from examination at the port of New York the following:

Office of the General Appraiser: Chief clerk and law clerk.
Approved, November 18, 1889. BENJ. HARRISON.

FIRST ANNUAL MESSAGE.

Executive MANSION, Washington, December 3, 1889. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

There are few transactions in the administration of the Government that are even temporarily held in the confidence of those charged with the conduct of the public business. Every step taken is under the observation of an intelligent and watchful people. The state of the Union is known from day to day, and suggestions as to needed legislation find an earlier voice than that which speaks in these annual communications of the President to Congress.

Good will and cordiality have characterized our relations and correspondence with other governments, and the year just closed leaves few international questions of importance remaining unadjusted. No obstacle is believed to exist that can long postpone the consideration and adjustment of the still pending questions upon satisfactory and honorable terms. The dealings of this Government with other states have been and should always be marked by frankness and sincerity, our purposes avowed, and our methods free from intrigue. This course has borne rich fruit in the past, and it is our duty as a nation to preserve the heritage of good repute which a century of right dealing with foreign governments has secured to us.

It is a matter of high significance and no less of congratulation that the first year of the second century of our constitutional existence finds as honored guests within our borders the representatives of all the independent States of North and South America met together in earnest conference touching the best methods of perpetuating and expanding the relations of mutual interest and friendliness existing among them. That the opportunity thus afforded for promoting closer international relations and the increased prosperity of the States represented will be used for the mutual good of all I can not permit myself to doubt. Our people will await with interest and confidence the results to flow from so auspicious a meeting of allied and in large part identical interests.

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