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The appropriations necessary to carry into effect the provisione of the act should be promptly made and be immediately available.

BENJ. HARRISON.

ExecutIve MANSION, Washington, February 12, 1890

To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State, respecting the International Marine Conference which was held in the city of Washington in the year 1889, together with a copy of the proceedings of the conference, including the final act. BENJ. HARRISON.

ExEcutive MANsion, February 17 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I transmitherewith a communication of the 11th instant from the Secretary of the Interior, submitting a copy of a report from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and accompanying draft of a bill to amend the first section of an act entitled “An act to provide for the allotment of lands in severalty to Indians on the various reservations, and to extend the protection of the laws of the United States and the Territories over the Indians, and for other purposes,” approved February 8, 1887.

The matter is presented for the consideration and action of Congress.

BENJ. HARRISON.

Executive MANSION, February 18, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith a communication of the 8th instant from the Secretary of the Interior, submitting a report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and accompanying agreement, made with the Sisseton and Wahpeton bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians, for the purchase and release of the surplus lands in the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation, in the States of North and South Dakota, the negotiations for said purchase and release having been conducted under the authority contained in the fifth section of the general allotment act of February 8, 1887 (24 U. S. Statutes at Large, p. 388), which provides, among other things, that the “purchase shall not be complete until ratified by Congress, and the form and manner of executing such release shall also be prescribed by Congress.”

This agreement involves a departure from the terms of the general allotment act in at least one important particular. It gives to each member of the tribe, 160 acres of land without regard to age or sex, while the general law gives this allotment only to heads of families. There are. I

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think, serious objections to the basis adopted in the general law, especially in its application to married women; but if the basis of the agreement herewith submitted is accepted, it would, I think, result in some cases, where there are large families of minor children, in excessive allotments to a single family. Whatever is done in this case will of course become in some sense a precedent in the cases yet to be dealt with. Perhaps the question of the payment by the United States of the annuities which were forfeited by the act of February 16, 1863 (12 U. S. Statutes at Large, p. 652), should not have been considered in connection with this negotiation for the cession of these lands. But it appears that a refusal to consider this claim would have terminated the negotiation, and if the claim is just its allowance has already been too long delayed. The forfeiture declared by the act of 1863 unjustly included the annuities of certain Indians of these bands who were not only guilty of no fault, but who rendered meritorious services in the armies of the United States in the suppression of the Sioux outbreak and in the War of the Rebellion. The agreement submitted, as I understand, provides for the payment of the annuities justly due to these friendly Indians to all the members of the two bands per capita. This is said to be the unanimous wish of the Indians, and a distribution to the friendly Indians and their descendants only would now be very difficult, if not impossible. The agreement is respectfully submitted for the consideration of Con

gress. BENJ. HARRISON.

Executive MANsion, February 24, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith a communication of 18th instant from the Secretary of the Interior, submitting copy of a report from the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, inclosing, with accompanying papers, a draft of a bill authorizing the removal of the Indians of the Papago or Gila Bend Reservation, in Maricopa County, Arizona Territory, to the Papago Indian Reservation, in Pima County, in said Territory, or to the Pima and Maricopa Indian reservations, commonly known as the Gila River and Salt River Indian reservations, respectively, in said Territory, and for

other purposes. The matter is presented for the early consideration and action of

Congress. BENJ. HARRISON.

ExecutIve MANsion, February 24, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith a communication of the 18th instant from the Secretary of the Interior, submitting a copy of a report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and accompanying item for insertion in the bill making appropriations for the current and contingent expenses of the Indian Department, which makes provision for further compensation of Henry B. Carrington, special agent appointed under the act of March 2, 1889, “to provide for the sale of lands patented to certain members of the Flatheadband of Indians in Montana Territory, and for other purposes,” to secure the consent of the Indians thereto and appraise the lands and improvements thereof; for an appropriation to remove the Indians whose lands have been sold to the Jocko Reservation, and for additional legislation considered necessary to complete this matter, as suggested by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. I also transmit a copy of the report of Special Agent Carrington and its inclosures. The matter is presented for the early consideration of Congress.

BENJ. HARRISON.

ExECUTIVE MANSION, March 4, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

In pursuance of the authority and direction contained in the act of Congress approved January 14, 1889, entitled “An act for the relief and civilization of the Chippewa Indians in the State of Minnesota,” three commissioners were appointed by the President on February 26, 1889, as therein authorized and directed, namely, Henry M. Rice, of Minnesota, Martin Marty, of Dakota, and Joseph B. Whiting, of Wisconsin, to negotiate with said Indians. The commissioners have submitted their final report, with accompanying papers, showing the results of the negotiations conducted by them, and the same has been carefully reviewed by the Secretary of the Interior in his report to me thereon. Being satisfied from an examination of the papers submitted that the cession and relinquishment by said Chippewa Indians of their title and interest in the lands specified and described in the agreement with the different bands or tribes of Chippewa Indians in the State of Minnesota was obtained in the manner prescribed in the first section of said act, and that more than the requisite number have signed said agreement, I have, as provided by said act, approved the said instruments in writing constituting the agreement entered into by the commissioners with said Indians. The commissioners did not escape the embarrassment which unfortunately too often attends our negotiations with the Indians, namely, an indisposition to treat with the Government for further concessions while its obligations incurred under former agreements are unkept. I am sure it will be the disposition of Congress to consider promptly and in a just and friendly spirit the claims presented by these Indians through our

commissioners, which have been formulated in the draft of a bill prepared by the Secretary of the Interior and submitted herewith.

The act of January 14, 1889 (25 U. S. Statutes at Large, p. 642), evidently contemplated the voluntary removal of the body of all these bands of Indians to the White Earth and Red Lake reservations; but a proviso in section 3 of the act authorized any Indian to take his allotment upon the reservation where he now resides. The commissioners report that quite a general desire was expressed by the Indians to avail themselves of this option. The result of this is that the ceded land can not be ascertained and brought to sale under the act until all of the allotments are made.

I recommend that the necessary appropriations to complete the surveys and allotments be made at once available, so that the work may be begun and completed at the earliest possible day.

A copy of the report made by the commissioners, with copies of all the papers submitted therewith, except the census rolls, is herewith presented for the information of the Congress.

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, March 24, 1890. To the House of Representatives:

In answer to the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 8th instant, in relation to the employment by the Regular Army of the United States of Indian scouts for the purpose of pursuing hostile Indians in their raids in the territory of the United States and Mexico, and in regard to the proposed transfer of the Apache Chiricahua Indians from Mount Vernon Barracks, Ala., to Fort Sill, Ind. T., I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of State on the subject, together with the accompanying papers.

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, March 29, 1890. To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with the resolution of the Senate of the 28th instant, the House of Representatives concurring, I return herewith the bill (S. 1332) entitled “An act granting to the city of Colorado Springs, in the State of Colorado, certain lands therein described for water reservoirs."

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

Washington, March 31, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I herewith transmit a report from the Secretary of State, in relation to the discriminating duty now imposed upon foreign works of art, and

recommend that action thereon looking to the removal of the discrimination be taken by Congress during its present session, if practicable.

BENJ. HARRISON.

ExecutIve MANSION, To the House of Representatives: Washington, April 15, 1890. I herewith transmit, in reply to the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 3d instant, a report from the Secretary of State, accom

panied by certain correspondence in regard to the seizure of the schooner Rebecca by the Mexican customs authorities at Tampico in February,

1884. BENJ. HARRISON.

ExecutIve MANSION, Washington, April 18, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives: I transmit herewith the fifth annual report of the Commissioner of

Labor. BENJ. HARRISON.

Executive MANSION, April 18, 1890. To the House of Representatives: In compliance with the resolution of the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring, I return herewith House bill No. 5179, entitled “An act fixing the rate of interest to be charged on arrearages of general and special taxes now due the District of Columbia if paid within a specified

time.” BENJ. HARRISON.

ExecutIve MANSION, April 21, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives: In compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring, I return herewith House bill No. 105, entitled “An act in relation to immediate transportation of dutiable goods, amendatory

of the act of July 1o, 188o.” BENJ. HARRISON

ExecutIve MANSION, Washington, April 21, 1890. To the Senate of the United States: In answer to the resolution of the Senate dated March 25 last, in relation to La Abra Silver Mining Company and the distribution or payment of moneys to that corporation on account of the award in its favor

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