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by the Mexican Government, I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State upon the subject, together with the accompanying papers.

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, April 30, 1890. To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate, the House of Representatives concurring, I return herewith Senate bill 895, entitled “An act to organize the Territory of Oklahoma, to establish courts in the Indian Territory, and for other purposes.”'

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 8, 1890. To the House of Representatives:

In answer to the resolution of the House of Representatives of March 31, 1890, respecting the importation into foreign countries of breadstuffs and provisions from the United States and the rates of duty imposed upon such articles, I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State on the subject, together with the accompanying papers.

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 13, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith a communication of the ioth instant from the Secretary of the Interior, and the accompanying copies of correspondence, relative to the condition of the Northern Cheyenne Indians at the Pine Ridge Agency, S. Dak.

The desire of these Indians to be united upon some common reservation with their brethren now occupying the Tongue River Reserve, in Montana, is quite natural, and such an arrangement would, I think, promote the best interests of both of these bands.

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 17, 1890. To the Senate of the United States:

In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of this date, I return herewith the bill (S. 903) entitled "An act for the erection of a public building in Cedar Rapids, Iowa."

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 19, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I inclose herewith a draft of a bill submitted by the Secretary of the Interior, providing for the survey and disposal of a tract of land situated in the city of Monterey, Cal., known as the “Cuartel” lot.

The lot referred to is one of the tracts excluded from the survey of the Pueblo lands of Monterey, Cal., by the decision of Acting Secretary of the Interior Muldrow of October 4, 1887 (6 Land Decisions, p. 179), on the ground that it was in a state of reservation for national purposes.

A communication from the Secretary of War to the Secretary of the Interior, copy herewith, states that this lot has been occupied at intervals by the War Department for military purposes, but as it is not within the limits of any declared military reservation the act of July 5, 1884 (23 U. S. Statutes at Large, p. 103), providing for a transfer to the Interior Department of abandoned military reservations, does not apply.

The lot is no longer required for military purposes, and a willingness is expressed by the War Department that the Department of the Interior should assume control of it. A copy of the tracing, with notes, is inclosed, showing an approximate survey and describing the situation of the lot.

I also inclose a copy of a report of the Commissioner of the General Land Office to the Secretary of the Interior, setting forth that under the decision of Mr. Muldrow the tract of land known as the “Cuartel” lot belongs to the United States by conquest and by treaty, and is in a state of reservation for national purposes, and respectfully submitting that Congress may continue its status as fixed by said decision or enact appropriate laws providing for its disposition as public land.

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 19, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith a report of the International American Conference, recently in session at this capital, recommending the survey of a route for an intercontinental line of railroad to connect the systems of North America with those of the southern continent, and to be conducted under the direction of a board of commissioners representing the several American Republics.

Public attention has chiefly been attracted to the subject of improved water communication between the ports of the United States and those of Central and South America. The creation of new and improved steamship lines undoubtedly furnishes the readiest means of developing an increased trade with the Latin-American nations. But it should pot be forgotten that it is possible to travel by land from Washington to the southernmost capital of South America, and that the opening of railroad communication with these friendly States will give to them and to

us facilities for intercourse and the exchanges of trade that are of special value.

The work contemplated is vast, but entirely practicable. It will be interesting to all, and perhaps surprising to most of us, to notice how much has already been done in the way of railroad construction in Mexico and South America that can be utilized as part of an intercontinental line.

I do not hesitate to recommend that Congress make the very moderate appropriation for surveys suggested by the conference and authorize the appointment of commissioners and the detail of engineer officers to direct and conduct the necessary preliminary surveys.

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 21, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith a communication of the 20th instant from the Secretary of the Interior and accompanying correspondence in the matter of the request of the Seminole Nation of Indians for negotiations with the Creek Nation of Indians for the purchase of an additional quantity of land, being about 25,000 acres, for the use of the Seminoles. The request is based upon the fact that former purchases do not embrace all of the lands upon which the Seminole Indians have made improvements, and which by the corrected survey were given to the Creeks. The money to be paid for these lands is to be reimbursed to the Government by the Seminoles.

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 26, 1890. To the House of Representatives:

In compliance with the resolutions of the House of Representatives of the 23d instant, the Senate concurring, I return herewith the bills H. R. Nos. 380 and 2007, entitled, respectively, "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act to authorize the Cairo and Tennessee River Railroad Company to construct bridges across the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers,' approved January 8, 1889,” and “An act granting a pension to the widow of Adam Shrake."

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 27, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith a letter from the Secretary of State, inclosing a report adopted by the International American Conference, recently in session at this capital, recommending the establishment of an international American bank, with its principal offices in the city of New York

and branches in the commercial centers of the several other American Republics.

The advantages of such an institution to the merchants of the United States engaged in trade with Central and South America and the purposes intended to be accomplished are fully set forth in the letter of the Secretary of State and the accompanying report. It is not proposed to involve the United States in any financial responsibility, but only to give to the proposed bank a corporate franchise, and to promote public confidence by requiring that its condition and transactions shall be submitted to a scrutiny similar to that which is now exercised over our domestic banking system.

The subject is submitted for the consideration of Congress in the belief that it will be found possible to promote the end desired by legislation so guarded as to avoiall just criticism.

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 28, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

I transmit herewith a communication of the 26th instant from the Sec. retary of the Interior, and accompanying item of appropriation, to enable the President to continue the negotiations authorized by sections 14 and 15 of the Indian appropriation act approved March 2, 1889, with the 'Cherokee Indians and with all other Indians owning or claiming lands west of the ninety-sixth degree of longitude in the Indian Territory, for the cession to the United States of all their title, claim, or interest of every kind or character in and to said lands, etc. The matter is presented for the favorable action of Congress.

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, June 2, 1890. To the House of Representatives:

In compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 29th ultimo, the Senate concurring, I return herewith the bill (H. R. 7345) entitled “An act authorizing and directing the Secretary of War to establish new harbor lines in Portage Lake, Houghton County, Mich."

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, June 2, 1890. To the Senate and House of Representatives:

The International American Conference, recently in session at this capital, recommended for adoption by the several American Republics

1. A uniform system of customs regulations for the classification and valuation of imported merchandise;

2. A uniform nomenclature for the description of articles of merchan. dise imported and exported; and

3. The establishment at Washington of an international bureau of information.

The conference also at its final session decided to establish in the city of Washington, as a fitting memorial of its meeting, a Latin-American library, to be formed by contributions from the several nations, of historical, geographical, and literary works, maps, manuscripts, and official documents relating to the history and civilization of America, and expressed a desire that the Government of the United States should provide a suitable building for the shelter of such a library, to be solemnly dedicated upon the four hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America.

The importance of these suggestions is fully set forth in the letter of the Secretary of State and the accompanying documents, herewith transmitted, to which I invite your attention.

BENJ. HARRISON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, June 6, 1890. To the Senate of the United States:

In response to the resolution of the Senate of the 26th of May, requesting me to “communicate to the Senate such information as may be in possession of the executive department relating to the alleged landing of an armed force from the United States revenue cutter McLane at Cedar Keys, Fla., and the alleged entry of houses of citizens by force, and their alleged pursuit of citizens of the United States in the surrounding country, and the authority under which the commanding officer of the cutter acted in any such matter," I submit for the information of the Senate the accompanying correspondence, which contains all the information possessed by the executive department relating to the matters inquired about.

It will be observed that the United States collector of customs at Cedar Keys had been driven from his office and from the town and the administration of the customs laws of the United States at that port suspended by the violent demonstrations and threats of one Cottrell, the mayor of the place, assisted by his town marshal, Mitchell. If it had been necessary, as I do not think it can be in any case, for a United States officer to appeal to the local authorities for immunity from violence in the exercise of his duties, the situation at Cedar Keys did not suggest or encourage such an appeal, for those to whom the appeal would have been addressed were themselves the lawless instruments of the threatened violence. It will always be agreeable to me if the local authorities, acting upon their own sense of duty, maintain the public order in such a way that the officers of the United States shall have no occasion to appeal for the intervention of the General Government; but when this

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