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Statement showing the number and compensation of the messengers and

employés, other than clerks, in the legislative department and at the President's house.

In the Senate.

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1 keeper of the stationery...

.....annual compensation... 1 superintendent of the document room...

....do........do... 1......do......of the folding room..... ... ...do........do.... 2 messengers.

.....do........do.... 15....do

........do........do..... 1.....do

........do........do..... 1.....do

.....do........do...... 2 assistants in document room......

.do. 1 superintendent in charge of Senate furnaces.

.do........do.... 1 assistant..do......do........do.

..do........do... 2 mail boys.

..do........do. 1 laborer in private passage.

...do........do... 1 page.....

.....do........do.... Pages $2 per day and $200 extra compensation..

$1,752 00 1,500 00 1,500 00 1,500 00 1,200 00 1,080 00

750 00 1,200 00 1.080 00

600 00 900 00 600 00 500 00

...do...

In the House,

1 superintendent of folding room....

.....annual compensation.... 1......do......of document room.. ..............do........do..... 1 messenger in charge of hall..

.....do........do...... 2.....do

..do. ....do. 5.....do

..do........do.... 5.....do

..do........do.... 13....do

....do..... ...do ... 14 pages, at $2 40 per day..

At the President's house.

1,800 00 1,752 00 1,740 00 1,752 00 1,500 00 1,440 00 1.200 00

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CONGRESS

MESSAGE

OF

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,

IN COMPLIANCE WITH

A resolution of the 21st ultimo, calling for copies of correspondence and

other information relative to the transmission of the mails and munitions of war over the Illinois central railroad.

March 6, 1856.-Read, referred to the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, and

ordered to be printed.

To the Senate of the United States :

In compliance with the resolution of the Senate of the 21st ultimo, I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of the Interior, with accompanying papers.

FRANKLIN PIERCE. WASHINGTON, March 5, 1856.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, March 1, 1856. SIR: I have the honor to return herewith the resolution of the Senate of the 21st ultimo, requesting you to communicate any correspondence which may have taken place between the Illinois Central Railroad Company and any of the departments of the government, on the subject of transporting the United States mails, munitions of war, public moneys, and other property of the United States, &c.

Immediately on the receipt of this resolution, I transmitted copies of the same to the Secretaries of the Treasury and War Departments, and to the Postmaster General.

Herewith I have the honor to lay before you a copy of all the correspondence which has been had with this department on the subject. I am, sir,, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. MCCLELLAND, Secretary. To the PRESIDENT.

GENERAL LAND OFFICE,

February 28, 1856. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the resolution of the Senate of the United States, calling for “any correspondence which may have taken place between the Illinois Central Railroad Company and any of the departments of the government on the subject of transporting the United States mails over the said railroad, &c., which resolution was referred by you to this office on the 26th instant, with the request to “communicate to the department any correspondence which this office may have had on the subject.”'

In reply I have to state that the only correspondence with this office on the subject is the following:

Letter from Hon. G. W. Jones, dated December 14, 1855, addressed to the President of the United States, and referred by you to this office, which letter was returned to the department on the 26th December last.

Letter from the Commissioner of the General Land Office, dated December 26, 1855, addressed to W. H. Osborn, president of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, in which was enclosed a copy of Hon. Geo. W. Jones' letter of December 14, 1855.

Letter from W. H. Osborn, president of Illinois Central Railroad Company, dated December 31, 1855,' and addressed to the Commissioner of the General Land Office.

Letter from W. H. Osborn, president, &c., dated December 31, 1855, addressed to the Secretary of the Interior, which letter was referred to this office on the 7th ult.

In compliance with your request I have the honor to transmit to you herewith copies of the above mentioned letters. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. A. HENDRICKS,

Commissioner'. Hon. R. McCLELLAND,

Secretary of the Interior.

WASHINGTON City, D. C., December 14, 1855. Sir: I desire earnestly to call your attention and that of your administration to the impositions practiced by the Illinois Central Railroad Company upon the travelling public in general, and in direct violation, as I conceive it to be, of the intention of the act of Congress making a grant of land to the State of Illinois to aid in the construction of said railroad.

The sixth section of said act provides that the mails of the United States shall at all times be transported over said road under the direction of the Postmaster General. The same act also provides for the transportation of munitions of war and other property of the United States.

If I am correctly informed, the said company refuses to be governed by the Post Office Department, or to conform to the schedules as prescribed by that branch of the government in carrying the mails. The people at Dubuque, and those to the west and northwest of that city, both in Iowa and Minnesota Territory, feel that many impositions were practiced upon them by this railroad company, not only in the

transportation of freight and passengers, but especially with reference to the arrivals and departures of the mails at Dubuque, which is the distributing post office for the northwestern section of the Union.

When the road was first put in operation to Dubuque the arrivals and departures of the cars were so regulated as to allow the mails to be crossed to and from the post office at Dubuque in daylight, but to accede to the wishes of certain speculators who are concerned at Dunleith, the arrivals and departures of the express mail trains were so regulated as to require the mails and passengers either to cross the river in the night, at the risk of their lives and the loss of the mail, or to remain at Dunleith during the night. This was equal to a delay of twenty-four hours in the transmission of all mails destined to the west and northwest of Dubuque.

The Secretary of the Treasury is apprised of the recent impositions practiced by that company upon the sub-treasurer at Dubuque, P. Quigley, esq., in the transmission, under the special direction of the Secretary of the Treasury, of three hundred thousand dollars, government money, from his office at Dubuque to the sub-treasury at St. Louis, Missouri. I refer you to that officer for particulars in this case.

If this railroad company, which has received a most munificent grant from the government of the United States to aid in the construction of this railroad, which was intended as a public accommodation, and specially to benefit, in certain cases, the government of the United States, has determined thus early to disregard the law and its obligations to the public, I hope that this administration, under your guidance and direction, will cause a thorough investigation into the subject to be had, and that you will withhold the issuing of the patents for the lands granted until such stipulations, contracts, and arrangements are made as will secure to the general government and the interests of the public the rights and benefits which it was intended should accrue to them in the passage of the act referred to above.

The act of Congress making this grant of land to Illinois provides for the construction of the road to Dubuque, in the State of Iowa, evidently intending that a railroad bridge should be made across the Mississippi river. I therefore hope that said company will be required to comply with this provision in the law, as well as those in relation to the transportation of the mails, munitions of war, &c.

The object of this communication is to bring this subject to your serious consideration, with the hope that justice may be done to the public as well as to the government of the United States. I am, very respectfully, your excellency's obedient servant,

GEORGE W. JONES. His Excellency FRANKLIN PIERCE,

President of the United States.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, December 27, 1855. SIR : On the receipt from you, on the 24th instant, of the enclosed letter from the Hon. George W. Jones, of Iowa, respecting the alleged infringements by the Illinois Central Railroad Company of the conditions of the grant of land made to the State of Illinois by the act of Congress approved September 20, 1850, it was referred to the Commissioner of the General Land Office, with directions to report how far the grant had been executed, and to suspend any further action in consummating the grant until further orders should be received.

The commissioner replied on the 26th instant, and I now have the honor to submit a copy of his communication, and await such directions as you may see proper to give on the subject. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. MCCLELLAND,

Secretary. To the PRESIDENT.

GENERAL LAND OFFICE,

December 26, 1855. SIR: On Monday last, the 24th instant, shortly before the termination of office hours, there was handed to me the communication from the President of the United States to you, in relation to the Illinois ('entral Railroad Company, enclosing a letter from the Hon. George W. Jones, of the United States Senate, on the subject, and with your endorsement for a report, “as to how far the grant has been perfected by the issuing of patents, &c., and with the request that any further action in consummating the grant be suspended until further directions are received.”

I have the honor, herewith, to return said letters, and to report tha no patents have been issued for the lands granted to the State of Illinois by the act approved September 20, 1850, to aid in the construction of a railroad from Chicago to Mobile, the law not requiring the issuing of patents for said lands; but that on the 13th day of March, 1852, the then Secretary of the Interior, Hon. A. H. H. Stuart, in order to carry into effect the terms of said grant, approved to the State, pursuant to the recommendation of the Commissioner of the General Land Office, 2,595,053.75 acres of lands, (situated within the several limits prescribed by the act,) which covered the entire area of the grant; but sundry corrections having been subsequently made in consequence of errors found in the approved lists, amounting to 16,173.59 acres, the State made an additional selection, and on the 12th of November, 1853, the further quantity of 14,980.34 acres was by you approved to the State, “all subject to any valid interfering rights,” leaving a small quantity still due and yet to be approved to the State in virtue of the grant.

Copies of the lists of the lands which were approved, as aforesaid, have been certified by me, under the seal of this office, in virtue of

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