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H IS TO RY

0 F

Sir CHARLES GRANDISON.

IN A

SERIES OF LETTERS

By MR SAMUEL RICHARDSON,

AUTHOR OF PAMELA AND CLARISSA.

IN EIGHT VOLUME S.

VOLUME VII.

THE SEVENTH EDITION.

LONDON:
Printed for JOHN DONALDSON, corner of Arundel.street,
No. 195. in the Strand. Sold by T, WILSON, at York:
A. SMITH, Halifax: D. AKENHEAV, New-
castle: W. DARLING, Edinburgh: V. BOYD,
Dumfries': W. ANDERSON, Stirling :
ANGUS and Son, Aberdeen :

and L. FLIN, Dublin.

M.DCC.LXXVI.

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THE

H I S T O R Y

OF

Sir Charles Grandison, Bart.

L ET T E R I.

Signor JERONYMO della PorreTTA, To Sir CHARLES

GRANDISON.

Sept. 24.

Oct. 5.

W

Bologna, Sunday, { E have at last, my Grandifon, fomes hopes given us, that our dear Clementina will

yield to our wishes. The general, with his lady, made us a visit from Naples, on purpose to make a decisive effort, as he called it; and vowed that he would not return till he left her in a disposition to oblige us.

The bi. shop at one time brought the patriarch to reason with her ; who told her, that she ought not to think of the veil, unless her father and mother consented to her affuming it.

Mrs Beaumont was prevailed upon to favour us with her company. She declared for us : And on

Thursday

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Thursday laft Clementina was fillharder fet. Her father, mother, the general, and his lady, the bithop, all came into my chamber, and sent for her. She caine. Then did we all fupplicate her to oblige us. The general was at first tenderly urgent : The bithop besought her : The young marchionefs pressed her: My mother took her hand between both hers, and in silent tears could only sigh over it : And, lastly, my father dropt down on one knee to her--My daughter, my child, said he, oblige me. Your Jeronymo could not refrain from tears.

She fell on her knees O my father, said she, rise or I shall die at your feet !--Rise, my father !:

Not, my dear, till you consent to oblige me.
Grant me but a little time, my father!

my dear, my indulgent father!

The general thought he saw a flexibility which we had never before feen in her on this fubject, and called upon her for her instant deterınination. Shall a father kneel'in vain ? said he Shall a ino. ther in weeping filence in vain entreat ? Now, my lister, comply-or-He sternly stopt.

Have patience with me, faid ihe, but till the Chevalier's next letters come : You expect them foon. Let me receive his next letter. And, putting her hand to her forehead-Rise, my father, or I dię at your feet !

I thought the general pushed too hard. I begged that the next letters might be waited for.

Be it fo, faid my lather, rifing, and raising her: But whatever be the contents, remember, my dear. eft child, that I am your father, your indulgent father; and oblige me.

Will not this paternal goodness, my dear Clementina, said the general, prevail upon you? Your father, mother, brothers, are all ready to kneel to you: Yet are we all to be fighted ? And is a foreigner, an Englifhman, an heretic (great and noble as is the man, a man, too, whom you have

fo

cannot

so gloriously refused), to be preferred to us all ? Who can bear the thoughts of such a preference!

And remember, my lifter, said the bishop, that. you already know his opinion. You have already had his advice, in the letters he wrote to you in the month's correspondence which passed between you before he left Italy. Think you that the Chevalier Grandison can recede from an opinion fo-: lemnly given, the circumstances not having vario ed ?

I have not been well. It is wicked to oppose my father, my mother: I

argue
with

my brothers. I have not been well. Spare me, spare me, my lords, to the general and the bishop. My father gives me time : Don't you deny it me.

My mother, afraid of renewing her disorder, faid, Withdraw, my dear, if you chuse to do fo, and compose yourself: The intention is not to compel, but to persuade you.

O madam ! said she, persuafion so strongly urgedby my parents is more than compulsion.I take the liberty you give me.

She hurried to Mrs Beaumont, and, throwing her arms about her, O madam, I have been oppreffed ! Oppressed by persuafion! By a kneeling father! By, a weeping mother! By entseating brothers !-And this is but persuafion!--Cruel perfuafion!

Mrs Beaumont then entered into argument with her. She represented to her the general's inflexibility; her father's and mother's indulgence ; the wishes of her two other brothers ;. fhe pleaded your opinion given as an impartial man, not: merely as a Protestant: She told her of an admi.. rable young lady of your own country, who was qualified to make you happy; of whom she had heard several of your countrymen speak with great. distinction. This last plea; as the intimate friend. fhip between you and Mrs Beaumont is so well

knowny

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