English Grammar,: Adapted to the Different Classes of Learners, : with an Appendix, Containing Rules and Observations, for Assisting the More Advanced Students to Write with Perspicuity and Accuracy. ; [Three Lines from Blair]

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H. and E. Phinney, at their bookstore, printing-office and bindery., 1816 - 287 sivua
 

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III
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IV
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VI
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X
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XI
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XIII
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XIV
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XV
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XVIII
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XIX
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLI
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XLII
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XLIII
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
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XLVIII
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XLIX
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L
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Suositut otteet

Sivu 277 - Oh that my head were waters, and mine eyes a fountain of tears, that I might weep day and night for the slain of the daughter of my people!
Sivu 278 - And it came to pass at noon, that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud; for he is a god: either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, or, peradventure, he sleepeth, and must be awaked.
Sivu 259 - Homer was the greater genius; Virgil, the better artist; in the one, we most admire the man; in. the other, the work. Homer hurries us with a commanding impetuosity; Virgil leads us with an attractive majesty. Homer scatters with a generous profusion; Virgil bestows with a careful magnificence. Homer, like the Nile, pours out his riches with a sudden overflow; Virgil, like a river in its banks, with a constant stream.
Sivu 256 - OUR sight is the most perfect and most delightful of all our senses. It fills the mind with the largest variety of ideas, converses with its objects at the greatest distance, and continues the longest in action without being tired or satiated with its proper enjoyments.
Sivu 275 - He has visited all Europe, — not to survey the sumptuousness of palaces, or the stateliness of temples ; not to make accurate measurements of the remains of ancient grandeur, nor to form a scale of the curiosity of modern art ; not to collect medals, or...
Sivu 38 - Full many a gem of purest ray serene The dark unfathom'd caves of ocean bear : Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, And waste its sweetness on the desert air. Some village- Hampden, that, with dauntless breast, The little tyrant of his fields withstood, Some mute inglorious Milton here may rest, Some Cromwell guiltless of his country's blood. Th...
Sivu 273 - Nor wanting is the brown October, drawn, Mature and perfect, from his dark retreat Of thirty years; and now his honest front Flames in the light refulgent, not afraid Even with the vineyard's best produce to vie.
Sivu 284 - And but more relish'd as the more distress'd ; The broadest mirth unfeeling Folly wears Less pleasing far than Virtue's very tears: Good, from each object, from each place acquir'd...
Sivu 283 - Know then this truth (enough for man to know) " Virtue alone is happiness below.
Sivu 202 - The beauty of Israel is slain upon thy high places : how are the mighty fallen ! Tell it not in Gath, publish it not in the streets of Askelon ; lest the daughters of the Philistines rejoice, lest the daughters of the uncircumcised triumph.

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