The Cambridge History of Japan

Etukansi
Delmer M. Brown, John Whitney Hall, Cambridge University Press, William H. McCullough, Marius B. Jansen, Donald H. Shively, Kozo Yamamura, Peter Duus
Cambridge University Press, 1988 - 630 sivua
Japan's ancient age was a period of radical and political change during which a Chinese-style empire emerged. This volume of The Cambridge History of Japan spans the beginnings of human existence to the end of the eighth century, focusing on the thousand years between 300 B.C. and 784, the end of the fabulous Nara period. The volume explores this period in four stages: (1) The Yayoi period (to about 250 A.D.) when small kingdoms and kingdom federations accumulated enough power to dispatch diplomatic missions to Korea and China; (2) the Yamato period (to 587) when priestly rulers, having gained economic and military power, conquered most of Japan; (3) the Century of Reform (to 710) when Japanese leaders, pressed by China's expanding T'ang empire, set out to build a strong Chinese-style empire of their own; (4) the Nara period (to 784) when spectacular literary, artistic, architectural, and religious advances were made.
 

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Sisältö

Introduction
1
Toward a holistic approach
9
Great waves of change
20
The earliest societies in Japan
48
The preJōmon period
58
The Yayoi period
78
The Yamato kingdom
108
Yamato expansion
119
The evolution of Shinto
328
Early Buddha worship
359
Soga Buddhism
370
Ritsuryo Buddhism
388
Nara Buddhism
397
Control of persons
425
Policy changes
436
The early shõen
449

Yamato disruption
144
University
211
Laying the foundation
222
Nara and Tõdaiji
241
Authority crises
257
Japan and the continent
268
Early kami worship
317
Music and dance
486
The early evolution of historical consciousness
504
Vitalism
521
Optimism
537
Works cited
549
Glossaryindex
579
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