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L. S. d. L. S. d. Cochineal

..lb. 0 5 0 to 0 5 6 Coffee, Java ...cwt. 4 0 0

4 2 0 Cheribon

3 12 0 9 15 0 Bourbon

0

4 5 O Mocha

5 16 0 5 18 0 Cottou, Surat..

Ib. 0 TS 0 15
Extra fine...........
Bengal

0 1 1 0 1 5
Bourbon
Drugs, &c. for Dyeing.
Aloes, Epatica.......cwt. 11

0

15 0 0 Apniseeds, Star..... 6 10 6 7 7 0 Burax, Refined....

6 6

6 15 0 Unrefined, or Tincal 5 15

6 0 0 Camphire unrefined..... 14 10 0 16 10 0 Cardemoms, Malabarlb.. 04

07 0 -- Ceylon..... Cassia Buds..........cwt. 20 0 0 21 0 0 Lignea..

18 0 0 22 0 0 Castor Oil..............lb, 01 3

0 4 0 China Root.........cwt.

30 0
Coculus Indicus........ 3 5 0 3 10 0
Columbo Root...

3 50 3 10 0
Dragon's Bloud..
Gum Ammoniac, lump..
Arabic.......

3 10

5 0 0 Assafarida....

6 0

22 0 0 Benjamin

10 0

35 0 0 Animi...........cwt. 6 0 0 8 0 0 Galbanum...

28 0

32 0 0 Gumbogium 24 0

- 25 0 0 Myrrh.

9 0 -12 0 0 Olibanum,

6 0

8 0 0 Lac Lake...

0 13

O 1 9
Dye...

0 4 6

0 5 9 Shell, Block..

3 0 0

3 100 Shiyened..

4 10 0

0 0 Stick.........

9 10 0 8 0 0 Musk, China...........Oz.

0 15 0 0 18 0 Nux Vomica.........cwt.

4 15 0 Oil Cassia........ ...OZ 0 3 0 0 36 Cinnamon

1 8 0 Cloves.....

0 36 Mace....

0 36 Nutmegs

0 36 Opium... .......... lb. 1 4 0 Rhubarb

0 6 6 0 12 0 Sal Ammoniac ......cwt. 6 0 0

L. S. d. L. S. d. Senna...

.lb. 06 to 0 2 0 Turmerick,Bengal cwt...

China
Zedoary
Galls, in Sorts....... 14 0 0
Blue.....

15 15 0
Indigo, Blue .............Ib. O 10 9 0 11 2
Blue and Violet....... 096

0 10 6 Purple and Violet. ... 0 8 6 09 Fine Violet...

0 8 6 09 0 Good Ditto....

0 7 9 0 8 3 FineViulet & Copper.. 0 7 3 0 79 Good Ditto...

0 66 0 7 0 Fine Cupper.............

0 7 3 0 7 6 Good Ditto...

0 63 069 Ordinary Ditto 04 6 0 5 3 Rice, Like Carolina ..cwt. 017 0 0 18 0 Safflower....

..... .cwt. 70 0 - 10 00 Sago

.cwt. 2 4 0 4 16 0 Saltpetre, Refined.....cwt. 4 15 0 Silk, Bengal Skein ...... lb. 0 15 1

0 19 10 Novi

10 1 1 9 0 Ditto White China

1 3 1

1 5 9 Organzine.

1 15 0 1 19 1 Spices, Cinnamon.. .lb. 0 12 3 0 138

0 39 0911 Bourbon

0 4 0 Mace.....

0 10 6 0 19 0

0 7 9

...cwt. 8 0 0 Pepper, Company's.. 0 0 10 Privilege

0 0 9 White

0 I 5

0 1 6 Sugar, Yellow ......... cwl. 2 16 0 2 18 0

3 3 0 3 15 Brown ....

2 4 0

2 8 0 Tea,Bohea.......... Ib. 0 1 10 Congou

0 2 3 0 3 5 Souchong.

0 3 0 0 4 2 Campoi.

090 0 3 10 Twankay

033 0 3 7 Pekoe

0 5 9 0 66 Hyson Skin

0 3 4 04 6 Hyson ...,

0 5 9

0 6 0 Gunpowder ........... 0 5 10 0 6 1 Tortoisehell ....

1 5 0

8 0 Woods, Saunders Red ton. 15 00 14 0

0

Cloves ..........

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Ginger ..

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Goods declared for Sale at the East-India House. On Monday, 4 Dec. 1815.-Prompi 8 March 1816. Mother-o'-Pearl Shells, 20 Tons-Ground Rattans,

10,000-Pepper, 239 Bags-Assafoetida, 10 Chests Company's.-Saltpetre, 494 Tons,

Ebony Wood, 20 Pieces-Coffee, 11,381 Bags Privilege.-Saltpetre, 62 Tons and a quarterCassia Lignea, 510 Chests—Cassia Buds, 100 Chests

Gum Assafætida, 20 Chests. -Sago, 39 Bags-Nutmegs & Mace, 2 Boxes-Rice,

Private-Trade.--Ground Rattans, 10,869–Nut. megs,

Chests. 1,860 Bags Sugar, 2,448 Bags–Ginger, 2,012 Bags. Private-Trade. -Ginger, 232 Bags.

On Tuesday, 23 Jan. 1816.-Prompt 26 April folo

lowing On Tuesday, 12 Dec. 1915.-Prompt 15 March 1816.

Privilege.-Cassia, 65 Chests-Sago, 794 Bagg - Company's.-Cotton Wool, 2 Bales.

Ginger, 533 Bags—Cassia Lignea, 100 Chests.com Privilege.-Turmeric, 5,023 Bags – Elephants'

Nutmegs, 4 Casks-Oil Cassia, i Box-Soy, 6 Teeth, 123 Bags-Soy, 5 Tubs-Lac Dye, 83 Chests

Chests. --Shellac, sığ Chests Gum Arabic, 71 Chests—Do. Benjamin, 10 Cases & 30 Chests-Do. Mastick, On Thursday, 25 Jan. 1816.--Prompt 26 April fol1 Chest-Do. Olibanum, 33 Chests - Du. Myrrh,

lowing. 10 Chests-Borax, 12 Chests-Tincal, 46 ChestsCardemoms, 178 Bags & 34 Chests-Safflower, 21

Privilege-Castor Oil and Turmeric, 24 Boxes Bales-Lac Lake, 8 Chests—China Root, 6 Tons &

-Turmeric, 1,027 Bags-Cajeputa Oil, 1 Case 348 Bags---Castor Oil, 33 Chests--Aloes, 5 Casks

Gum Arabic, 2 Chests-Do. Animi, 22 Chests Mother-o'-Pearl Counters,1 Box-Mother-o'-Pearl

Star Anniseed, 59 Chests-Chillies, 1,200 Bags. Spoons, 1 Box-Fishing Lines, 2 Boxes—Anniseed

On Tuesday, 6 Feb. 1816.-Prompt 10 May polo Oil, s Boxes-Dragons Blood, 2 Boxes-Myrabo

lowing. lans, 1 Bag-Sena, 96 Bales-Table Mats, 120 Parcels-Galanga Root, 530 BagsMusk, 4 Boxes Company's.-Nankeens (7 yards), 174,800 Pieces Cotton Wool, 40 Bales-Cassia Buds, 100 Chests --Nankeens (5 yards), 68,500 Pieces. Cassia Lignea, 510 Chests-Nutmegs, i Bag-Mace, i Bag-Anniseed, 75 Chests--Camphire, 169 Chests

On Friday, 1 March 1816.-Prompt 14 June fol-Honey, i Case.

lowing

Company's.-Cloves, 200,000 lbs.-Mace, 100,000 On Wednesday, 20 Dec. 1815.- Prompt 22 March lbs.-Nutmegs, 250,000 lbs. Oil of Cinnamon, 20 1816.

Bottles-Oil of Nutmegs, 50 Bottles-Oil of NutPrivilege.-Redwood, 5,020 Pieces & 10 Tons megs and Mace, 200 Bottles. Buffalo Hides, 114 - Red Saunders Wood, 2,677 Pieces & 191 Cwt.-Rattans, 18,516 Bundles-Sa. On Tuesday, 2 April 1816.-Prompe 19 July gola pan Wood, 169 Cwt. ---Tutenague, 4 cwt. 3 qrs. 19

Lowing, 165.-Tin, 995 Pieces--Munjeet, 1,470 Bundles Company's, Cinnamon, 160,000 lbs.

Daily Prices of Stocks from the 20th of November to the 20th of December 1815.

Bank
Stock.

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154

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613
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913 15
92 15
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913 158
911
911 153
918

151
91
903
901

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23 2401
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28 2384
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5 237
6 2337
7

237
9
11
12 2371
13
14 238
15 238
16 | 237
18
19 2381
20

238

60

5.3p

741

4 зр
4.57
4.2p

615

3.6pr.
3 5P
2.5p
2.5p
3.6p
3.6p

3.6p
60; 2.5p

2.62

1.5p
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6.3p
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4p.2d
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2d.4p
20.3p
20.4p
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603
601
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60
59
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593
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60
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591
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154pr.
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2.3d
3.41
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613
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THE

ASIATIC JOURNAL

FOR

FEBRUARY 1816.

ORIGINAL COMMUNICATIONS.

To the Editor of the Asiatic Journal. SIR, I am not of the number of try. I deduce from these general those who amuse their fancies with positions, that nothing inconsistent the notion that the affairs of nations with them is to be expected of the are capable of being condueted in Company's territory in India; that such a manner as to avoid the re its gradual extension, from its earcurrence of war. I am far, there- · liest beginning to the present mofore, from expecting of the Com- ment, is an inevitable process, pany's government in India that it which no human strength could should restrain itself from all ap- ' have prevented ;

that upon all peals to arms.

the principles which are applicable I believe that no state, the ter- in every other case, it must necesritory of which does not comprize sarily have happened in this, either a whole island, can long remain that the territory of the Company without enlarging or suffering a should be enlarged, or that it diminution of its territories. Eng- should be diminished, if not wholly land is an example in the British lost; and that the same principles islands. So long as there remain- are still operating, and will coned any territory to be added to her tinue to operate: so that this terown, so long she proceeded in the ritory will always be tending to an career ofterritorial aggrandizement. increase, or to an extinction. I Had she not done this, Wales, Scot-' do not set it down, therefore, as land, or Ireland, would have added

an abstract political crime, that England to itself. England is now the Company's government, or the unable to give further extension to King's government, in India, has her frontiers; and the same sea arrived at accessions of territory. which limits her ambition, gives If it be true, that always exsecurity to what she actually pos- cepting civil wars, wars are more

Still her political advance- frequent in Asia than in Europe, ment is not arrested. If she cannot this fact must plead an additional add to the size of her islands, she apology for British aggrandizecan acquire further wealth and ments. It is impossible for the population. Every thing that is most peacefully disposed to persehuman is unstable; it is either vere in tranquillity amid restless growing or decaying; and in one neighbours: a view to security and of these alternatives must be self-preservation is often a genuine found the actual state of the coun- and unimpeachable motive to agAsiatic Journ.-No. II.

VOL. I. P

sesses,

grandizement, and even to aggres- national politics of the state. The sion.

British empire in India subsists But, Sir, with these views to re- wholly for commercial purposes ; gulate our judgment, to check any it is wholly detached from our privisionary expectations of perpetual mary national interests ; and a peace, and to convince us of the variety of other circumstances conhopelessness of wholly avoiding In- tribute to make the civil and midian wars, it is still proper that we litary policy, most conducive to its should look with a jealousy neverto prosperity, essentially different be exceeded, not merely at every from that which is demanded for Indian war, but at every acquisition the state at home. Now, nothing of Indian territory. I have said, is more reasonable to believe, than that our territory, since it has not that habit may imperceptibly lead decreased, has increased in virtue an Englishman to overlook the of laws which no human power can distinction. controul. . This is true only of the In spite of that pacific and tendency of those laws; for it is purely mercantile policy by which doubtlessly often within the reach we ought, and by which, it is to of human wisdom either to mode- be presumed, we have been gorate or to quicken their operation. verned in India, a very short period Moreover, it is by the very, ag- has seen us involved either in hosgrandizement of a territory, that tilities or bickerings with Nipal, we may give occasion to its cur- Candy, China, and it is now said, tailment. The grandeur of a state, the Mahratta states. It is plain, I have contended, is always ad- from the opinions I have advanced, vancing or receding ; but it is not that I am not the person hastily to always visible to every eye in pronounce, that in any one of the which direction it is moving: instances thus cited, our Indian

I should be ashamed, Sir, to governments have been in the dwell on these general proposi- wrong. My iş to fix attention tions and simple truisms, if I did on these accumulated animosities ; not believe that principles and to hold them up to rigid exalandmarks like these are often of mination ; and, above all things, the highest value to us, in the de- to agitate the question, whether in termination of our conduct under the most successfnl issue of our particular circumstances; that they Asiatic hostilities, the British inare like the fixed stars and con terests can be really served; and stellations, toward which the ma- especially if that success is made riner does not always desire to to consist in the acquisition of tersteer, but which equally enable ritory on the Continent of India. him to pursue his course in any Of the necessity of entering other direction.

upon the war with Nipal I profess With the same impression on myself incompetent to offer my mind, I am anxious that those opinion; but I think that I can who can in any way influence the clearly discern, in the occurrence politics of India should have even of that war, a great irremediable further maxims of a general kind evil: an evil not to be compenbefore them. Nothing more im- sated for by any success in its mediately points out the impor- issue ; an evil which, no doubt, tance of such a study than the would have been great if we had consideration, that some of the ra- been beaten ; but which, perhaps, dical principles upon which those is as great, or greater, because we politics ought to be regulated, have finally succeeded. It has are precisely such as are dia- multiplied our enemies and our metrically opposite to the prin- vulnerable points; it has increased ciples which ought to govern the our territorial cares, and exposed

an

us to new foreign vexations; it in which we court its trade an act has drawn us further from our of extreme, though irreproachasupplies; it has laid the founda- ble humility ? and is it inconsistent tion of new wars; it has added to that our whole demeanour should our temptations to aggrandize- have a certain correspondence with ment; in a word, the exemption it? In the great diversity of sifrom this evil would have been tuation, a policy which would be cheaply purchased, we may be highly censurable, if adopted by lieve, by many sacrifices.

Great Britain toward

any power

of Not the least of the evils of the Europe, may be very commendaNipal war, and its success, is the ble in its intercourse with China. tendency of both to bring us into But, we are told, at present, near contact with the frontiers of that our war with the Mahrattas is China. It appears from some a consequence of that with Nipal. missionary statements, that our I shall not suffer myself to quote, north-eastern territory has already and much less to comment on the stretched to within a fortnight's causes of this new war, such as journey of the borders of that they are at present rumoured by empire. In the quarrel with the public voice; but content myChina which first introduced an self with remarking that it is in this Englishman to the north of the manner one war rises out of anomountains of Nipal, a Chinese ther, and therefore the greater the army encamped on the hills that necessity to avoid fanning the first command a prospect of the valley flame. of the Ganges.* Now, every The war in Ceylon has à chaapproximation of our territory, racter of its own. It was not the every advance toward the sphere Company's war, and it may lead of action of the Chinese govern- to no evil consequences.

Still ment, is filled with danger in a the principle is to be examined. variety of forms.

The precari- We have heard a good deal of the ous existence of our trade at barbarous character of the king, Canton needs no additional oc- and all this is truly lamentable ; casions of difficulty on the land- but we are not to constitute ourside ; and the near contact might selves avengers or guardians of become fatal to us in a territorial the globe, and make the existence view, whether its first fruits were of wrong an universal pretext for conquests on the Chinese part, or A position equally ridicu.

The continuance of lous and frightful has been recentan intermediate country, serving ly defended from the English press; as a common barrier to the two namely, thata nation or a sovereign, empires, is earnestly to be wished doing that which is contrary to the for.

law of nature, gives occasion of Of the disputes at Canton, now war to a party, otherwise no intesaid to be happily subsided, I shall rested than as all mankind are inspeak with as little decision as of terested in whatever is good or bad those with Nipal. It should be upon the earth ; and that he may observed, in the meantime, that be treated as a common enemy, our intercourse with China is alto- hostis humani generis.* The truth gether peculiar in its nature, and is, that every independent nation is that our policy should be adapted to judge of the law of nature for itaccordingly. Much is said of the self; and that to justify war upon haughtiness of the Chinese go- the simple assertion of the belli. vernment; but is not the manner gerent, that the nation or sove

war.

on our own.

* See the preface to Kirkpatrick's Account of Nepaul.

* See a pamphlet on the Spanish slavetrade,

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