Sivut kuvina
PDF
ePub

of war are continually floating about, and each nation appears to be suspicious of the other. A speech, delivered by the King of Prussia, has increased this uneasiness, for, whilst promising peace, the words used had such a defiant tone, that they seem rather to betoken war. And the words and attitude of the Emperor of France are not more reassuring. Rome, too, is in a similar condition. It is stated that the French troops are ordered to be withdrawn, but that a vehement protest has been uttered against this from the Vatican. Implements of war are being supplied to the Pope by the “faithful," in prospect, probably of some impending emergency, and it is rumoured that another attack is being organized against the old city.

Speaking of Rome reminds us of the statement recently made by a Roman Catholic priest in a chapel in London. Rome was, he said, hal. lowed ground; the very atmosphere was religious; it was the most moral city on the face of the earth (!). Unfortunately for the veracity of this statement, a mass of indisputable facts contradicts it. A return obtained by Sir John Bowring, at the instance of Lord Palmerston, shows that not long ago there were, at one time, five hundred and eighty murderers lying in prison in Rome, out of a population of three millions! If the murderers in London bore an equal proportion to those in Rome, we should have three or four hundred a-year, or some six or eight every week. In the year in which Sir John Bowring's inquiry took place, there were 4,374 children born in Rome, 3,160 of whom were sent to the Foundling Hospitals! indicating an amount of immorality positively appalling; and yet this is said to be the most moral city on the face of the earth.” The present Dean of Canterbury, Dr. Alford (a man whom no one would probably accuse of bigotry), recently visited Rome, and he has published his experience of its morality and religion. The following are specimens :

On Saturday, February 20, 1864, two young men, clerks of Signor Baldini, were conveying home from the office to their master's bank the money remaining after the day's transactions. They conveyed it in a hired carriage. At half-past seven o'clock, in the Via in Lucina, within seventy paces of the crowded Corso, the carriage was stopped by six armed men, who dragged the clerks out, killed them, and took away the money, £1,700. The murderers escaped, and never were taken. The universal conviction was, that the police were privy to the whole transaction.

“We enter the church of S. Maria sopra Minerva. After, perhaps, an hour of service of different kinds, in which the people take no part whatever, we see, by the stir which is going on, and the passing out and in between the winter choir and the sacristy, that something is about to be done. At last a silken canopy appears, borne on four poles at the corners. A priest goes up to the altar, and lifts a white cloth, which had previously during the service been concealing something beneath, as is the case on the Communion-table of our English churches, when the elements about to be consecrated are placed there before Morning Prayer. And now, if my English reader had been present, I believe he would have felt what I feltglow of shame heating his cheek_shame for our disgraced Christianityshame for our very nature itself-when the object thus reverently concealed proved to be a wax doll, about eighteen inches in length. This the priest took in his arms with gestures of reverence; and it was borne round the church, under the canopy, in solemn procession, with candles held by each Dominican. When the head of the procession reached the end of what we in

a few

England should call the south aisle (churches in Rome are built without regard to east and west), he stood still, and faced down the aisle. Each member of the body, as he came up, having given his candle into the hand of an attendant, who extinguished it, reverently approached the doll, kissed its toes, and, bowing, touched them with his forehead. Nor was this all. When every one in the procession had done this, the priest delivered the doll to another, apparently inferior in rank, who took it to a side, over which was a presepé, a representation of the manger, with St. Joseph and St. Mary. In this manger the doll was eventually deposited; but, first, a rail was run out into the church, like the rail at which our communicants kneel, and at that rail the people flocking knert by relays, while the doll was carried round again and again, each person, as the Dominicans had done, kissing its toes, and touching them reverently with the forehead. Here is another specimen : A friend of mine, shocked at his profanity, asked him, 'Do you forget who Christ is, that you thus blaspheme Him?' 'Bah,' answered the man, 'I'm not afraid of Him (non no paura di lui).' Whom, then, do you fear ?' pursued my friend.

Vi diro' (I will tell you), was the answer of the man, as he approached the questioner, and whispered in his ear, 'Ho paura della Madonna, ma non di lui,''I'm afraid of the Madonna, but not of Him.'As a writer in the Advertiser remarks, “If this is to be called a religion at all, it is a false religion, a religion scarcely any better than that of Mohammed or Buddhu. And hence we feel no surprise that, under such a system, the morals of Rome are no better than those of Persia or of Burmah." The number of churches in Rome is upwards of 300; the population according to the last census, was 201,161; consequently there is one church for every 670 persons, in which the mummeries of Popery are continually enacted (for no other kind of churches or chapels are tolerated there on any consideration). Ought not this to be sufficient to satisfy every requirement? We should imagine so, but not so "Archbishop" Manning; he actually held a meeting in London the other day for the purpose of collecting funds for building another church in Rome, and earnestly impressed on his hearers the necessity of relaxing their purse-strings in honour of St. Thomas, whose ancient church at Rome had been destroyed in evil times. St. Thomas, in Monsignor Manning's opinion, possesses peculiar claims on the generosity of English Roman Catholics, having died a martyr to the principle of the separation of Church and State!

From the judicial statistics of Ireland, we learn that much larger numbers of constabulary are required, in proportion to the population, in Roman Catholic than in Protestant counties. The following statistics are from the census of 1861: The population of the county of Antrim is 247,564; the population of Tipperary is 249,106. But while 272 policemen are sufficient to preserve the peace in Antrim, 1,122, or more than four times the number, are required to keep the peace in Tipperary. Nearly the same disproportion prevails in other counties. The Belfast News Letter ascribes this difference to religion, and asserts that where Roman Catholics predominate there the police establishment is numerous and costly; but in every county which has a Protestant majority of inhabitants, the constabulary force is small and has little to do. The same disproportion is observable with regard to the number of criminals; thus, while Roman Catholics are less than one-third of the population of the county Antrim, they supply a larger number of prisoners than the Protestant two-thirds. The contrast is still greater in Londonderry and Fermanagh. The whole number of Protestants in Ireland bear to Roman Catholics the proportion of thirteen to forty-three. But Protestant prisoners committed in 1860 bore to the Roman Catholics the proportion of only six to forty-five, the total being 4,391 Protestants, against 29,263 Roman Catholics.

We are glad to hear that the Spaniard, Julian Vargas, who was thrown into the prison of Malaga on suspicion of holding and promulgating Protestant doctrines, has been liberated on bail.

We are also thankful to learn that the obstacles to the progress of the Gospel in Mexico, thrown in the way by Romish influence, have been completely removed, so that there is now everywhere an open field. The Roman Catholic priests are compelled to wear citizens' dress; religious processions are forbidden. Evangelical tracts are in great demand among the people. And it is stated that the governor of the provinces recently remarked that “there had been enough of man-worship in Mexico, and that it was time for the people to begin to worship God."

Two remarkable and very forcible protests have been made against the policy of Mr. Gladstone in reference to the Irish Church by two of his staunchest adherents—the one by the eminent lawyer Sir Roundell Palmer, and the other by Mr. William Rathbone Greg, who has been an enlightened and zealous supporter of the liberal cause for nearly half a century. Sir Roundell still expresses warmly his admiration of Mr. Gladstone, and his adherence to the party of which he is the acknowledged chief, but he most decidedly objects to his movement against the Protestant Church in Ireland, both on the ground of its inexpediency and its injustice. Mr. Greg expresses his views in a letter addressed to the Pall Mall Gazette equally as clearly. He says: “I believe the course of proceeding into which Mr. Gladstone has led his party in reference to the Irish Church to be mistaken, dangerous, untimely, and entered upon without any distinct or comprehensive foresight of its consequences. I cannot perceive the sagacity or profoundness of a policy which proposes to weaken and disarm a Church which is friendly to the British connexion and the Imperial rule, in order to gratify, without attempting to control, or curb, or neutralize, a Church which of late years has shown itself inimical to both."

Mr. Greg clearly and at length shows the folly of such a policy, and the evils which it would bring upon the country, and he concludes: “It would go well only with the Church of Rome, which, with its mighty organization, its persistent dogmatism, its unflinching pretensions, and its relentless grasp, would stand forth contrasting, unique, and dominant, amid the circumambient confliot and confusion, offering shelter to weary and bewildered victims, crying out in their perplexity

"O quis me gelidis in vallibus Hæmi

Sistat, et ingenti ramorum protegat umbra ?!”

Hints on Elocution and Public Speaking. By Charles William Smith, Pro

fessor of Elocution. London: Simpkin, Marshall and Co.—This is & shilling work deserving the special attention of clergymen, ministers, and all engaged in public speaking, comprising, as it does, the most practically careful observations of the best writers on elocution, with many others suggested by the author's own experience. The book before us will prove an invaluable aid to all public speakers, and professional men who at any time have to take part in public speaking or debate.

THE

GOSPEL MAGAZINE.

" COMPORT YE, COMFORTYR MY PEOPLE, SAITII YOUR GOD."

“ENDEAVOURING TO KEEP THE UNITY OP TIE SPIRIT IN THE BOXD OP PEACE." « JESUS CHRIST, TIIB SAME YESTERDAY, AND TO-DAY, AND FOR EVER." "WIION TO KNOW IS LIFE ETERNAL

No. 35, New Series. )

NOVEMBER, 1868.

No. 1,235,
| OLD SERIES.

The Family Portion;

or, WORDS OF SPIRITUAL CAUTION, COUNSEL, AND COMFORT. “Who comforteth us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort them which are in any

trouble, by the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God.”—2 Cor. i. 4.

SUFFERING AND SYMPATHY. And a certain man was there, which had an infirmity thirty and eight

years. When Jesus saw him lie, and knew that he had been now a long time in that case, He saith unto him, Wilt thou be made whole ?

-John v. 5, 6. SOME seven-and-twenty years ago (accompanied by a dear friend and correspondent, J. G., of Essex, the late never-to-be-forgotten JAMES Groom) we paid a visit to our native town of Portsmouth. At an early hour on the Sunday morning, we had personally a season of very special communion with the Lord. The time was an unusually blessed one, insomuch that we were at a loss to know what was intended by such a visitation. Subsequently our dear friend expressed his belief that the Lord intended we should speak in His name that day. Personally, however, we could not see it so. At the hour of service, Mr. Groom sought the meeting-place of some friends of whom he had heard, or with whom he had been in correspondence ; and we accompanied a dear brother to an upper room, where a few of the children of God usually met for prayer and reading. That room was within a few hundred yards of where the old and ever-to-beremembered Circus stood, rendered memorable by the preaching of the everlasting Gospel there for some years, through the instrumentality of the Rev. J. KNAPP, the Rector of St. John's, Portsea. We doubt not that there are many now in heaven, and others on their way thither, who date their personal knowledge of God and the experience of His love and mercy, to the preaching of the Gospel in the Circus at Portsmouth.* Arrived at the upper room before men

* When recently at Portsmouth, a dear brother in the Lord, who had long laboured in the locality (the Rev. J. VEYSEY), said to us, “There is a dear child of God living in such a street, who dates her conversion to your sermon in the old Circus, upon the text, “Let her glean even among the sheaves, and reproach her not; and lot fall some of the handfuls of

TT

Fermanagh. The whole number of Protestants in Ireland bear
Catholics the proportion of thirteen to forty-three. But
prisoners committed in 1860 bore to the Roman Catholics the
of only six to forty-five, the total being 4,391 Protestants, agains-
Roman Catholics.

We are glad to hear that the Spaniard, Julian Vargas, w thrown into the prison of Malaga on suspicion of holding and , gating Protestant doctrines, has been liberated on bail.

We are also thankful to learn that the obstacles to the progress Gospel in Mexico, thrown in the way by Romish influence, have been pletely removed, so that there is now everywhere an open field. Roman Catholic priests are compelled to wear citizens' dress ; reli, processions are forbidden. Evangelical tracts are in great demand ai. the people. And it is stated that the governor of the provinces rect remarked that “there had been enough of man-worship in Mexico, that it was time for the people to begin to worship God."

Two remarkable and very forcible protests have been made against : policy of Mr. Gladstone in reference to the Irish Church by two ot : staunchest adherents-the one by the eminent lawyer Sir Roun. Palmer, and the other by Mr. William Rathbone Greg, who has been enlightened and zealous supporter of the liberal cause for nearly hat century. Sir Roundell still expresses warmly his admiration of 11Gladstone, and his adherence to the party of which he is the ackpo i ledged chief, but he most decidedly objects to his movement against t Protestant Church in Ireland, both on the ground of its inexpediency al its injustice. Mr. Greg expresses his views in a letter addressed to thi Pall Mall Gazette equally as clearly. He says: “I believe the course c proceeding into which Mr. Gladstone has led his party in reference to th Irish Church to be mistaken, dangerous, untimely, and entered upor without any distinct or comprehensive foresight of its consequences.] cannot perceive the sagacity or profoundness of a policy which propose: to weaken and disarm a Church which is friendly to the British connexion and the Imperial rule, in order to gratify, without attempting to control, or curb, or neutralize, a Church which of late years has shown itself inimical to both."

Mr. Greg clearly and at length shows the folly of such a policy, and the evils which it would bring upon the country, and he concludes: " It would go well only with the Church of Rome, which, with its mighty organization, its persistent dogmatism, its unflinching pretensions, and its relentless grasp, would stand forth contrasting, unique, and dominant, amid the circumambient confliot and confusion, offering shelter to weary and bewildered victims, crying out in their perplexity

“O quis me gelidis in vallibus Hæmi

Sistat, et ingenti ramorum protegat umbra?!”

Hints on Elocution and Public Speaking. By Charles William Smith, Pro

fessor of Elocution. London: Simpkin, Marshall and Co.—This is a shilling work deserving the special attention of clergymen, ministers, and all engaged in public speaking, comprising, as it does, the most practically careful observations of the best writers on elocution, with many others suggested by the author's own experience. The book before will prove an invaluable aid to all public speakers, and professioi men who at any time have to take part in public speaking or debate

« EdellinenJatka »