Sivut kuvina
PDF
ePub

medicine, surgery and hygiene before a board of medical officers of the said service. Said examination shall be conducted according to rules prepared by the surgeon-general and approved by the Secretary of the Treasury and the President. Original appointments in the service shall only be made to the rank of assistant surgeon; and no officer shall be promoted to the rank of passed assistant surgeon until after four years' service and a second examination as aforesaid; and no passed assistant surgeon shall be promoted to be surgeon until after due examination.

The Surgeon-General is authorized to cause the detail of two surgeons and two passed assistant surgeons for duty in the bureau, who shall each receive the pay and allowances of their respective grades in the general service. (R. S., 4802; Mar. 3, 1875; Jan. 4, 1889; July 1, 1902; Aug. 14, 1912.)

The President is authorized, in his discretion, to utilize the Public Health Service in times of threatened or actual war to such extent and in such manner as shall in his judgment promote the public interest without, however, in any wise impairing the efficiency of the service for the purposes for which the same was created and is maintained. (July 1, 1902; sec. 4.)

The President shall from time to time prescribe rules for the conduct of the Public Health Service. He shall also prescribe regulations respecting its internal administration and discipline, and the uniforms of its officers and employees. It shall be the duty of the Surgeon-General to transmit annually to the Secretary of the Treasury, for transmission by said Secretary to Congress, a full and complete report of the transactions of said service, including a detailed statement of receipts and disbursements. (July 1, 1902; sec. 9.)

The medical officers of the United States, duly clothed with authority to act as quarantine officers at any port or place within the United States, and when performing the said duties, are hereby authorized to take declarations and administer oaths in matters pertaining to the administration of the quarantine laws and regulations of the United States. (Feb. 15, 1893, sec. 12; Mar. 3, 1901.)

The Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to lease, or to sell at public auction, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, after due notice in the public newspapers, such marine-hospital buildings and lands appertaining thereto as he may deem it advisable to sell, and to make, execute, and deliver all needful conveyances to the lessées or purchasers thereof respectively; and the proceeds of such leases and sales are hereby appropriated for the marine-hospital establishment. But the hospitals at Cleveland in Ohio, and Portland in Maine, shall not be sold or leased. And this section shall not be construed to authorize the Secretary of the Treasury to lease or sell any such hospital where the relief furnished to sick mariners shall show an extent of relief equal to twenty cases a day on an average for the last preceding four years, or where no other suitable and sufficient hospital accommodations can be procured upon reasonable terms for the comfort and convenience of the patients. (R. S., 4806.)

The Secretary of the Treasury may rent or lease such marine-hospital buildings, and the lands appertaining thereto, as he may deem advisable in the interests of the public health and marine-hospital

51433°-23-28

service; and the proceeds of such rents or leases are hereby appropriated for the said service. (Mar. 3, 1875; sec. 4.)

It shall be the duty of the Surgeon-General of the Public Health Service, under the direction of the Secretary of the Treasury, to perform all the duties in respect to quarantine and quarantine regulations which are provided for by this act, and to obtain information of the sanitary condition of foreign ports and places from which contagious and infectious diseases are or may be imported into the United States, and to this end the consular officer of the United States at such ports and places as shall be designated by the Secretary of the Treasury shall make to the Secretary of the Treasury weekly reports of the sanitary condition of the ports and places at which they are respectively stationed, according to such forms as the Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe; and the Secretary of the Treasury shall also obtain, through all sources accessible, including State and municipal sanitary authorities throughout the United States, weekly reports of the sanitary condition of ports and places within the United States, and shall prepare, publish, and transmit to collectors of customs and to State and municipal health officers and other sanitarians weekly abstracts of the consular sanitary reports and other pertinent information received by him, and shall also, as far as he may be able, by means of the voluntary coöperation of State and municipal authorities, of public associations, and private persons, procure information relating to the climatic and other conditions affecting the public health, and shall make an annual report of his operations to Congress, with such recommendations as he may deem important to the public interests. (Feb. 15, 1893, sec. 4; July 1, 1902.)

Whenever the proper authorities of a State shall surrender to the United States the use of the buildings and disinfecting apparatus at a State quarantine station, the Secretary of the Treasury shall be authorized to receive them and to pay a reasonable compensation to the State for their use, if in his opinion they are necessary to the United States. (Feb. 15, 1893, sec. 8.)

. Immigration and Naturalization Bureau.

The office of commissioner-general of immigration is hereby created and established, and the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, is authorized and directed to appoint such officer, whose salary shall be four thousand dollars per annum, payable monthly. The commissioner-general of immigration shall be an officer in the Department of Labor, under the control and supervision of the Secretary of Labor, to whom he shall make annual reports in writing of the transactions of his office, together with such special reports, in writing, as the Secretary of Labor shall require, and in addition to his other duties, shall have charge under the Secretary of Labor of thc administration of the alien-contract labor laws.

The Secretary shall provide the commissioner-general with a suitably furnished office in the city of Washington, and with such books of record and facilities for the discharge of the duties of his office as may be necessary. He shall have a chief clerk at a salary of two thousand dollars per annum and two first class clerks. (Mar. 3, 1891, sec. 7; Mar. 2, 1895; Feb. 14, 1903, secs. 4,7.)

Hereafter the Commissioner-General of Immigration, in addition to his other duties, shall have charge of the administration of the Chinese exclusion law and of the various Acts regulating immigration into the United States, its Territories, and the District of Columbia, under the supervision and direction of the Secretary of Labor.' (June 6, 1900; Feb. 14, 1903, secs. 4, 7.)

The Commissioner-General of Immigration, in addition to such other duties as may by law be assigned to him, shall, under the direction of the Secretary of Labor, have charge of the administration of all laws relating to the immigration of aliens into the United States, and shall have the control, direction, and supervision of all officers, clerks, and employees appointed thereunder. · He shall establish such rules and regulations, prescribe such forms of bond, reports, entries, and other papers, and shall issue from time to time such instructions, not inconsistent with law, as he shall deem best calculated for carrying out the provisions of this Act and for protecting the United States and aliens migrating thereto from fraud and loss, and shall have authority to enter into contract for the support and relief of such aliens as may fall into distress or need public aid; all under the direction or with the approval of the Secretary of Labor. And it shall be the duty of the CommissionerGeneral of Immigration to detail officers of the immigration service from time to time as may be necessary, in his judgment, to secure information as to the number of aliens detained in the penal, reformatory, and charitable institutions (public and private) of the several States and Territories, the District of Columbia, and other territory of the United States and to inform the officers of such institutions of the provisions of law in relation to the deportation of aliens who have become public charges: Provided, That the Commissioner-General of Immigration may, with the approval of the Secretary of Labor, whenever in his judgment such action may be necessary to accomplish the purposes of this Act, detail immigration officers, and also surgeons, in accordance with the provisions of section seventeen, for service in foreign countries. (Mar. 3, 1903; sec. 22; Feb. 14, 1903, secs. 4, 7; Feb. 20, 1907, sec. 22.)

The commissioners of immigration at the several ports shall be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to hold their offices for the term of four years, unless sooner removed, and until their successors are appointed. (Aug. 18, 1894.)

The duties of the commissioners of immigration shall be of an administrative character, to be prescribed in detail by regulations prepared, under the direction or with the approval of the Secretary of Labor. (Feb. 20, 1907, sec. 23.)

Immigrant inspectors and other immigration officers, clerks, and employees shall hereafter be appointed and their compensation fixed and raised or decreased from time to time by the Secretary of Labor, upon the recommendation of the Commissioner-General of Immigration and in accordance with the provisions of the civil-service Act of January sixteenth, eighteen hundred and eighty-three: Provided, That said Secretary, in the enforcement of that portion of this Act which excludes contract laborers, may employ, without reference to the provisions of the said civil service Act, or to the

a

various Acts relative to the compilation of the official register, such persons as he may deem advisable and from time to time fix, raise, or decrease their compensation: Provided further, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to alter the mode of appointing commissioners of immigration at the several ports of the United States as provided by the sundry civil appropriation Act approved August eighteenth, eighteen hundred and ninety-four, or the official status of such commissioners heretofore appointed. Immigration officers shall have power to administer oaths and to take and consider evidence touching the right of any alien to enter the United States, and, where such action may be necessary, to make a written record of such evidence; and any person to whom such an oath has been administered under the provisions of this Act who shall knowingly or wilfully give false evidence or swear to any false statement in any way affecting or in relation to the right of any alien to admission to the United States shall be deemed guilty of perjury and be punished as provided by section fifty-three hundred and ninetytwo, United States Revised Statutes. The decision of any such officer, if favorable to the admission of any alien, shall be subject to challenge by any other immigration officer, and such challenge shall operate to take the alien whose right to land is so challenged before a board of special inquiry for its investigation. Every alien who may not appear to the examining immigrant inspector at the port of arrival to be clearly and beyond a doubt entitled to land shall be detained for examination in relation thereto by a board of special inquiry. (Feb. 20, 1907, sec. 24.)

Such boards of special inquiry shall be appointed by the commissioner of immigration at the various ports of arrival as may be necessary for the prompt determination of all cases of immigrants detained at such ports under the provisions of law. Each board shall consist of three members, who shall be selected from such of the immigrant officials in the service as the Commissioner-General of Immigration, with the approval of the Secretary of Labor, shall from time to time designate as qualified to serve on such boards: Provided, That at ports where there are fewer than three immigrant inspectors, the Secretary of Labor, upon the recommendation of the Commissioner-General of Immigration, may designate other United States officials for service on such boards of special inquiry. Such boards shall have authority to determine whether an alien who has been duly held shall be allowed to land or shall be deported. All hearings before boards shall be separate and apart from the public, but the said boards shall keep a complete permanent record of their proceedings and of all such testimony as may be produced before them; and the decision of any two members of a board shall prevail, but either the alien or any dissenting member of the said board may appeal through the commissioner of immigration at the port of arrival and the Commissioner-General of Immigration to the Secretary of Labor, and the taking of such appeal shall operate to stay any action in regard to the final disposal of any alien whose case is so appealed until the receipt by the commissioner of immigration at the port of arrival of such decision which shall be rendered solely upon the evidence adduced before the board of special inquiry: Provided, That in every case where an alien is excluded from admission into the United States, under any law or treaty now existing or hereafter made, the decision of the appropriate immigration officers, if adverse to the admission of such alien, shall be final, unless reversed on appeal to the Secretary of Labor; but nothing in this section shall be construed to admit of any appeal in the case of an alien rejected as provided for in section ten of this Act. (Feb. 20, 1907, sec. 25.)

[NOTE.—The Division of Naturalization of the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization was made the Bureau of Naturalization by the act of March 4, 1913.] Coast Guard.

There shall be established in lieu of the existing Revenue-Cutter Service and the Life-Saving Service, to be composed of those two existing organizations, with the existing offices and positions and the incumbent officers and men of those two services, the Coast Guard, which shall constitute a part of the military forces of the United States and which shall operate under the Treasury Department in time of peace and operate as a part of the Navy, subject to the orders of the Secretary of the Navy, in time of war or when the President shall so direct. When subject to the Secretary of the Navy in time of war the expense of the Coast Guard shall be paid by the Navy Department: Provided, That no provision of this Act shall be construed as giving any officer of either the Coast Guard or the Navy, military or other control at any time over any vessel, officer, or man of the other service except by direction of the President. (Sec. 1.)

. In the Coast Guard there shall be a captain commandant, senior captains, captains, first lieutenants, second lieutenants, third lieutenants, engineer in chief, captains of engineers, first lieutenants of engineers, second lieutenants of engineers, third lieutenants of engineers and constructors, cadet and cadet engineers, warrant officers, petty officers, and other enlisted men, all of said offices, respectively, corresponding to the present offices of the Revenue-Cutter Service, which was transferred to the Coast Guard, and all the present incumbents, officers and enlisted men, are also transferred to corresponding positions in the Coast Guard; a general superintendent, assistant general superintendent, district superintendents, keepers, and surfmen, which offices and positions shall be transferred from the corresponding positions in the existing Life-Saving Service and be made like positions in the Coast Guard, and all the incumbent officers and surfmen shall be transferred to such corresponding positions in the Coast Guard, in which the superintendents shall be commissioned as such, keepers shall be warrant officers, and surfmen shall be enlisted men, of which enlisted men the number one surfmen shall be petty officers.

*

Except as herein modified all existing laws relating either to the present Life-Saving Service or the present Revenue-Cutter Service shall remain of force as far as applicable to the Coast Guard and the offices, positions, operations, and duties shall in all respects be held and construed to impose the same duties upon the positions and their incumbents in the Coast Guard as are now imposed upon

« EdellinenJatka »