A Plain and Literal Translation of the Arabian Nights' Entertainments, Now Entituled The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night: With Introduction, Explanatory Notes on the Manners and Customs of Moslem Men, and a Terminal Essay Upon the History of The Nights, Nide 10

Etukansi
Burton Society for private circulation, 1900
 

Mitä ihmiset sanovat - Kirjoita arvostelu

Yhtään arvostelua ei löytynyt.

Muita painoksia - Näytä kaikki

Yleiset termit ja lausekkeet

Suositut otteet

Sivu 185 - Adam the goodliest man of men since born His sons, the fairest of her daughters Eve.
Sivu 164 - On that night could not the king sleep, and he commanded to bring the book of records of the chronicles; and they were read before the king.
Sivu 231 - And there were also sodomites in the land: and they did according to all the abominations of the nations which the Lord cast out before the children of Israel.
Sivu 497 - ILAM EN NAS. Historical Tales and Anecdotes of the Times of the Early Khalifahs. Translated from the Arabic Originals. By Mrs. Godfrey Clerk, Author of "The Antipodes and Round the World.
Sivu 21 - There be three things which are too wonderful for me, Yea, four which I know not : The way of an eagle in the air ; the way of a serpent upon a rock; The way of a ship in the midst of the sea ; And the way of a man with a maid.
Sivu 53 - ... he took her to wife; and in due time he married his son. So they abode awhile in all solace of life and its delight and their days were serene and their joys untroubled, till there came to them the Destroyer of delights and the Sunderer of societies, the Depopulator of populous places and the Orphaner of sons and daughters. And glory be to the Living who dieth not and in whose hand are the Keys of the Seen and the Unseen!
Sivu 28 - Accordingly he dismounted and the Fellah left him and went off to the village, to fetch dinner for him whilst Ma'aruf sat awaiting him. Presently he said in himself, "I have taken this poor man away from his work; but I will arise and plough in his stead, till he come back, to make up for having hindered him from his work.
Sivu 513 - ... Jim, but I know them; and this old rip of ourn is one of the cleanest I've struck in history. Well, Henry he takes a notion he wants to get up some trouble with this country. How does he go at it— give notice?— give the country a show? No. All of a sudden he heaves all the tea in Boston Harbor overboard, and whacks out a declaration of independence, and dares them to come on.
Sivu 513 - Cain. My, you ought to seen old Henry the Eight when he was in bloom. He was a blossom. He used to marry a new wife every day, and chop off her head next morning. And he would do it just as indifferent as if he was ordering up eggs. 'Fetch up Nell Gwynn,' he says. They fetch her up. Next morning, 'Chop off her head!

Kirjaluettelon tiedot