Sivut kuvina
PDF
ePub

TO THE READER.

This Volume is, in the main, the result of many intervals, which the Author has employed “rather in deriving instruction and amusement from the works of others than in attempting to afford either by his own.

In this chequer-work he seeks a welcome to the fields and the fireside, the country and the town; and, above all things, he aims to commemorate those seasons of rest and joy which, in neither age of the world, have been more desirable than they are in the present. To show how this is sought to be accomplished, requires a few words of introduction as to the special contents of the following pages.

A GARLAND FOR THE YEAR is the fulfilment of a long-cherished design, dating from the time of the Author's first acquaintance with William Hone, when producing his Everyday Book; in which association were fostered the Writer's early indications of love of antiquarian lore, and matters of domestic history. The Garland is, however, but a précis in comparison with Mr. Hone's two bulky volumes: it gives the history in little of Memorable Days, with such new lights as the archæologist and the observer of Nature have thrown upon doubtful points; while it seeks to add serviceable information to that of curious and recreative character.

The rus et urbs range of SOMETHING FOR EVERYBODY is traceable to the Author's start in the world of letters, with a description of one of the most picturesque rural districts of England, and his culminating in the production of the Curiosities of London. Thus, in the present volume, you will find the history of the GAME AND THE STREET OF PALL MALL, in juxtaposition with the economy of the WHITEBAIT, and PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS OF BRAMBLETYE, the latter a nook of quiet as rustic as its name implies.

* Richard Sharpe ; prefixed to his Letters and Essays.

A

DOMESTIC ARTS AND Customs include a series of papers, mostly brief,
upon points of convivial history, and a few of the inventive ingenuities
which embellish life; as well as pictures of old English manners and
scenery, which have a special interest for a large class of readers.

In the GLORIES OF A GARDEN we see how many good men have been
made better by the pursuits of Gardening, and how pure is this “de-
lightful industry enjoyed at home;" and how, in its history we enjoy
converse with some of the gentlest spirits who adorn our literature.
The cottager's garden is not only remunerative by its addition to do-
mestic comfort, but it has holier uses :-

Yes! in the poor man's garden grow

Far more than herbs and flowers;
Kind thoughts, contentment, peace of mind,

And joy for weary hours.
In these papers are embodied, besides historic research, the recollec-
tions of visits to remarkable places--as Hatfield, and the Deepdene, and
Evelyn's "own dear Wotton.”

In the Collectanea of utilities with which the volume concludes, the
reader may find novelty and occasional reminders, combined, it is hoped,
with pleasure and profit.

Throughout the volume the Author has aimed at conveying such
information as may be useful without being dry, and amusing without.
trifling : his main object being to render the book cared for beyond the
moment; and that, when read and laid down, it

may

be taken up again
and re-read, and in each case, contribute to the gratification of the
reader, while it adds to his store of serviceable knowledge.

It need scarcely be repeated that the aids throughout the present
work—“ the rich flowers that are here set and growing”—are many;
and in their community of mind have been mainly reared the fruits of
the Author's own humble growth :-

The meanest floweret of the vale,
The simplest note that swells the gale,
The common sun, the air, the skies,
To him are opening Paradise.-Gray.

June, 1861.

CONTENTS.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

.

A GARLAND FOR THE YEAR, pp. 1-158.

PAGE

PAGE

New Year's Day

1 Morris Dance

66

Twelfth Day

6 Feast of St. Philip and St. James 68

The Carnival

10 Feast of the Holy Cross.-Furry

St. Distaff's Day

11 Day in Cornwall.–St. Dun.

Plough Monday

12

stan's Day

69

Seasons for Marriage

13 St. Augustine's Day

71

St. Anthony's Day

13 Restoration of Charles II. 72

Mallard Night

14 Sheepshearing

74

St. Wulstan's, St. Agnes', and St. The Shaftesbury Prize Byzant 75

Vincent's Days

15 Rogation Day

76

The Conversion of St. Paul 16 Holy Thursday

77

Martyrdom of King Charles I. 18 Well-flowering in Derbyshire 78

Candlemas

22 Whitsuntide

79

St. Blaze's Day.

23 Trinity-Sunday and Monday 82

St. Scholastica's Day

24 St. Barnabas Day

83

St. Valentine's Day

24 Corpus Christi Day

St. Matthias's Day

28 St. Antony of Padua.–St. Alban's

Shrovetide

28 Day

85

Lent

31 St. John the Baptist's Day.-

St. David's Day

33 Midsummer

86

St. Chad's Day.

34 St. Peter's Day.

St. Patrick's Day

35 Old Midsummer Day

90

Lady Day

37 St. Thomas of Canterbury 91

All Fools' Day

38 Dog Days

91

St. Herbert's Day.

39 St. Swithin's Day

92

St. George's Day

39 St. Margaret's Day

The Cuckoo

41 St. James's and St. Christopher's

Palm Sunday

42 Day

93

Gad-whip Manorial Service 43 St. Anne's Day .

94

Passion Week

44 St. Ignatius Loyola

95

Maundy Thursday.

44 Lammas Day

96

Good Friday

46 St. Wilfrid's Day

97

Easter

50 The Transfiguration

97

The Biddenden Maids

54 St. Lawrence's Day

98

Low Sunday

55 The Assumption

98

St. Mark's Day.

55 St. Roche's Day.- Harvest 99

May Day

56 St. Bartholomew's Day

May Morning at Oxford

65 St. Augustine's Day

102

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.

· 116

[ocr errors]

PALL MALL.—THE GAME AND THE STREET, pp. 159-164.

Pall Mall, where first played.-Pepys's Account.—The Mall in St. James's

Park.—Malls and Pall Malls.—Balls and Mallets for playing the Game
found in Mr. Vulliamy's House, Pall Mall.—Celebrities of the Old Street.-
Gay's Description.—The Tully's Head. — The Royal Academy.—Art Gal-
leries and the National Gallery.-Old Taverns.—Dr. Sydenham.-Nell
Gwyn and her Neighbours. -Assassination of Thynne.—Defoe's Pall Mall.
-Early Clubs.—Almack's Gaming Club.—Patrician Club-houses.-
Coffee-houses.—Duels.—Old Sights and Shows. —The Living Skeleton.-
Waterloo Museum.—Marlborough House. —Warwick House, &c.

WHITEBAIT, pp. 164–170.

Where Whitebait is taken.—Mr. Yarrell's Identification of the Species. — White-

bait fishing.-The Hamble and the Firth of Forth.—Whitebait Dinners

at Blackwall and Greenwich.-Ministerial Fish Dinners.—How Whitebait

are cooked.– Mr. Walker's Carte for a Whitebait Dinner.-Shad and

Shad Thames.

PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS OF BRAMBLETYE,

pp.

170—176.

The Weald of Sussex.-Saxon and Belgic Races.—Early Owners of Brambletye.-

The old moated House.—The House built by the Comptons.— Attacked
by the Parliamentarians in the Civil War. -Brambletye Farm half a
Century since. The old Kitchen Garden.- Forest Row.-Horace Smith's
historical Novel, Brambletye House. -Revisit in 1827.-Attractions of
the Place.—Traces of Brambletye and the Comptons, &c.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

230

Doileys

230

Colours-Blue and Buff

230

Old Posies for Rings

Pastry and Cookery Schools . . 233

· 232

.

« EdellinenJatka »