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nation crosses the same; running from thence down the said Coosa river with its eastern bank according to its various meanders to a point one mile above the mouth of Cedar creek, at Fort Williams, thence east two miles, thence south two miles, thence west to the eastern bank of the said Coosa river, thence down the eastern bank thereof according to its various meanders to a point opposite the upper end of the great falls, (called by the natives Woetumka,) thence east from a true meridian line to a point due north of the mouth of Ofucshee, thence south by a like meridian line to the mouth of Ofucshee on the south side of the Tallapoosa river, thence up the same, according to its various meanders, to a point where a direct course will cross the same at the distance of ten miles from the mouth thereof, thence a direct line to the mouth of Summochico creek, which empties into the Chatahouchie river on the east side thereof below the Eufaulau town, thence east from a true meridian line to a point which shall intersect the line now dividing the lands claimed by the said Creek nation from those claimed and owned by the state of Georgia : Provided, nevertheless, that where any possession of any chief or warrior of the Creek nation, who shall have been friendly to the United States during the war, and taken an active part therein, shall be within the territory ceded by these articles to the United States, every such person shall be entitled to a reservation of land within the said territory of one mile square, to include his improvements as near the centre thereof as may be, which shall inure to the said chief or warrior, and his descendants, so long as he or they shall continue to occupy the same, who shall be protected by and subject to the laws of the United States; but upon the voluntary abandonment thereof, by such possessor or his descendants, the right of occupancy or possession of said lands shall devolve to the United States, and be identified with the right of property ceded hereby.

2nd—The United States will guarantee to the Creek nation, the in- Guaranty of tegrity of all their territory eastwardly and northwardly of the said line other territory

. to be run and described as mentioned in the first article.

3d—The United States demand, that the Creek nation abandon all Intercourse communication, and cease to hold any intercourse with any British or with British or

Spanish posts Spanish post, garrison, or town; and that they shall not admit among them, any agent or trader, who shall not derive authority to hold commercial, or other intercourse with them, by licence from the President or authorised agent of the United States.

4th-The United States demand an acknowledgment of the right to Establishment establish military posts and trading houses, and to open roads within the of military

posts. territory, guaranteed to the Creek nation by the second article, and a right to the free navigation of all its waters. 5th—The United States demand, that a surrender be immediately

All property made, of all the persons and property, taken from the citizens of the taken to be sur

rendered. United States, the friendly part of the Creek nation, the Cherokee, Chickesaw, and Choctaw nations, to the respective owners; and the United States will cause to be immediately restored to the formerly hostile Creeks, all the property taken from them since their submission, either by the United States, or by any Indian nation in amity with the United States, together with all the prisoners taken from them during the war.

6th—The United States demand the caption and surrender of all the The prophets prophets and instigators of the war, whether foreigners or natives, who and instigators

of the war to be have not submitted to the arms of the United States, and become parties

given up. to these articles of capitulation, if ever they shall be found within the territory guaranteed to the Creek nation by the second article.

to cease.

Supplies of 7th—The Creek nation being reduced to extreme want, and not at corn to be pre- present having the means of subsistance, the United States, from sented to the Creeks.

motives of humanity, will continue to furnish gratuitously the necessaries of life, until the crops of corn can be considered competent to yield the nation a supply, and will establish trading houses in the nation, at the discretion of the President of the United States, and at such places as he shall direct, to enable the nation, by industry and

economy, to procure clothing. Permanent 8th—A permanent peace shall ensue from the date of these presents peace.

forever, between the Creek nation and the United States, and between

the Creek nation and the Cherokee, Chickesaw, and Choctaw nations. Lines of the 9th–If in running east from the mouth of Summochico creek, it territory.

shall so happen that the settlement of the Kennards, fall within the lines of the territory hereby ceded, then, and in that case, the line shall be run east on true meridian to Kitchofoonee creek, thence down the middle of said creek to its junction with Flint River, immediately below the Oakmulgee town, thence up the middle of Flint river to a point due east of that at which the above line struck the Kitchofoonee creek, thence east to the old line herein before mentioned, to wit: the line dividing the lands claimed by the Creek nation, from those claimed and owned by the state of Georgia.

The parties to these presents, after due consideration for themselves and their constituents, agree to, ratify and confirm the preceding articles, and constitute them the basis of a permanent peace between the two nations; and they do hereby solemnly bind themselves, and all the parties concerned and interested, to a faithful performance of every stipulation contained therein. In testimony whereof, they have hereunto interchangeably set their hands and affixed their seals, the day and date above written.

ANDREW JACKSON,

Maj. Gen. Commanding 7th Military District. Tustunnuggee Thlucco, Speaker for the Yoholo Micco, of Tallapoosa Eufaulau Upper Creeks

Stin-thel-lis Haujo, of Abecoochee Micco Aupocgau, of Toukaubatche Ocfuskee Yoholo, of Tou-ta-cau-gee Tustunnuggee Hoppoiee, Speaker of John O'Kelly, of Coosa the Lower Creeks

Eneah hlucco, of Immookfau Micco Achulee, of Cowetau

Espokokoke Haujo, of Wewoka William M•Intosh, Major of Cowetau Eneah Thlucco Hopoiee, of Talesee Tuskee Eneah, of Cussetau

Efau Haujo, of Puccan Tallahassee Faue Emautla, of Cussetau

Talesee Fixico, of Ocheobofau Toukaubatchee Tustunnuggee, of Nomatlee Emautla, or Captain Isaacs Hitchetee

of Cousaudee Noble Kinnard, of Hitchetee

Tuskegee Emautla, or John Carr of Hopoiee Hutkee, of Souwagoolo

Tuskegee Hopoiee Hutkee, for Hopoiee Yoholo, Alexander Grayson, of Hillabee of Souwogoolo

Lowee of Ocmulgee Folappo Haujo, of Eufaulau, on Chat- Nocoosee Emautla, of Chuskee Tallatohochee

fau Pachee Haujo, of Apalachoocla

William M'Intosh, for Hopoiee Haujo, Timpoeechee Bernard, Captain of

of Oose-oo-chee Uchees

William M'Intosh, for Chehahaw TusUchee Micco

tunnuggee, of Chehahaw. Yoholo Micco, of Kialijee

William M'Intosh, for Spokekee TusSo-cos-kee Emautla, of Kialijee

tunnuggee, of O-tel-le-who-yonChooc-chau Haujo of Woccocoi Esholoctee of Nauchee

Done at Fort Jackson, in presence of Charles Cassedy, Acting Secretary. Benj. Hawkins, Agent for Indian Affairs. Return J. Meigs, A. C. Nation. Robert Butler, Adjutant General United States’ Army. J. C. Warren, Assistant Agent for Indian Affairs. George Mayfield, Alexander Cornels, George Lovett, Public Interpreters.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

nee.

A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP,

Made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, July 18, 1815. and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the

Ratified, Dec. United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said 26, 1815. States, of the one part; and the undersigned Chiefs und Warriors of the Poutawatamie Tribe or Nation, residing on the river Illinois, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or Nation, of the other part.

The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles:

Article 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the Injuries, &c. contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgiven. forgot.

Art. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all Peace and the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals friendship percomposing the said Poutawatamie tribe or nation.

Art. 3. The contracting parties hereby agree, promise, and bind Prisoners to themselves, reciprocally, to deliver up all the prisoners now in their be delivered up. hands, (by what means soever the same may have come into their possession,) to the officer commanding at Fort Clarke, on the Illinois river, as soon as it may be practicable.

Art. 4. The contracting parties, in the sincerity of mutual friend- Former treaship, recognise, re-establish, and confirm, all and every treaty, contract, ties recognised

and confirmed. and agreement, heretofore concluded between the United States and the Poutawatamie tribe or nation. In witness of all and every thing herein determined between the

United States of America and the said Poutawatamie tribe or
nation, residing on the river Illinois, we, their underwritten Com-
missioners and Chiefs aforesaid, by virtue of our full powers, have
signed this definitive treaty, and have caused our seals to be here-
unto affixed. Done at Portage des Sioux, this eighteenth day of
July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and
fifteen, and of the independence of the United States the fortieth.

WILLIAM CLARK,
NINIAN EDWARDS,
AUGUSTE CHOUTEAU.

Sinnawchewome,

Bendegakewa,
Mucketepoke, or Black Partridge, Wapewy, or White Hair,
Neggeneshkek,

Ontawa.
Chawcawbeme,
In the presence of R. Wash, Sec'y to the Commissioners. Thomas Forsyth, I.
agent. N. Boilvin, agent. T. Paul, C. M. Maurice Blondeaux, agt. Manuel Lisa,
agent. John Miller, col. 3d inf. Richard Chitwood, Major M. Wm. Irvine Adair,
captain third regt. United States infantry. Cyrus Edwards, Saml. Solomon, Jacques
Mett, Louis Decouagne, John A. Cameron, Sworn Interpreters.
To the Indian names is subjoined a mark.

A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP,

July 18, 1815. Made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, Ratified, Dec.

and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the 26, 1815. United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said

States, of the one part; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Piankishaw Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or Nation, of the other part.

The parties being anxious of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon

which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles : Injuries, &e. ARTICLE 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the forgiven. contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and

forgot. Perpetual Art. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all peace and

the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals friendship.

composing the Piankishaw tribe or nation. Former trea

Art. 3. The contracting parties, in the sincerity of mutual friendties recognised ship, recognise, re-establish, and confirm, all and every treaty, contract, and confirmed.

or agreement, heretofore concluded between the United States and the said Piankishaw tribe or nation.

In witness of all and every thing herein determined between the

United States of America and the said Piankishaw tribe or nation, we, their underwritten Commissioners and Chiefs aforesaid, by virtue of our full powers, have signed this definitive Treaty, and have caused our seals to be hereunto affixed.

Done at Portage des Sioux, this eighteenth day of July, in the year

of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, and of the
independence of the United States of America the fortieth.

WILLIAM CLARK,
NINIAN EDWARDS,
AUGUSTE CHOUTEAU.

Lamanocon, or the axe,

Wapangia, or swan, Lameeprisjeau, or seawolf,

Namaingsa, or the fish. Monsairaa, or rusty, In the presence of R. Wash, sec'y to the commissioners. Thomas Forsyth, I. agent. N. Boilvin, agent. T. Paul, C. M. M. Maurice Blondeaux. John Hay. John Miller, col. 3d infantry. Richard Chitwood, major mt. Wm. Irvine Adair, cap. 3d reg. U. S. inf. Cyrus Edwards, Saml. Solomon, Jacques Mette, Louis Decouagne, John A. Cameron, Sworn interpreters.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

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A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP

Made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, July 19, 1815. and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the Ratified, Dec. United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said 26, 1815. States, of the one part; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Teeton Tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said Tribe, of the other part.

The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles :

Article 1. Every injury, or act of hostility, committed by one or Injuries, &c. either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven. forgiven and forgot.

Art. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all Perpetual the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals peace and composing the said Teeton tribe; and the friendly relations that existed

friendship, &c. between them before the war, shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed.

Art. 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and Protection of their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves and their aforesaid U. S. acknowtribe to be under the protection of the United States of America, and

ledged. of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever.

In witness whereof, the said William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and

Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners as aforesaid, and the Chiefs and Warriors of the said tribe, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this nineteenth day of July, one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, and of the independence of the United States the fortieth.

WILLIAM CLARK,
NINIAN EDWARDS,
AUGUSTE CHOUTEAU.

Eshkatapia, the player,

Ikmouacoulai, the shooting tiger, Tatanga, the true buffaloe,

Uakaberiboukai, the wind that passes, Mazamanie, the walker in iron,

Washeejorijatga, the left-handed FrenchWanakagmawie, the stamper,

man, Weechachamanza, the man of iron, Monetowanari, the bear's soul.

Done at Portage des Sioux, in the presence of R. Wash, secretary to the commission. John Miller, col. 3d infantry. H. Dodge, brig. gen. Missouri militia. T. Paul, C. T. of the C. Manuel Lisa, agent. Thomas Forsyth, I. agent. Maurice Blondeaux. John A. Cameron. Louis Decouagne. Louis Dorion.

Cyrus Edwards.
John Hay, Int.
To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

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