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A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP

Made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, May 13, 1816. and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners plenipotentiary of the

Proclamation, United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said Dec. 30, 1816. states, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors of the Sacs of Rock river and the adjacent country, of the other part.

Preamble.

Whereas by the ninth article of the treaty of peace, which was concluded on the twenty-fourth day of December, eighteen hundred and fourteen, between the United States and Great Britain, at Ghent, and which was ratified by the president, with the advice and consent of the senate, on the seventeenth day of February, eighteen hundred and fifteen, it was stipulated that the said parties should severally put an end to all hostilities with the Indian tribes, with whom they might be at war, at the time of the ratification of said treaty; and to place the said tribes inhabiting their respective territories, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war: Provided, they should agree to desist from all hostilities against the said parties, their citizens or subjects respectively, upon the ratification of the said treaty being notified to them, and should so desist accordingly.

And whereas the United States being determined to execute every article of the treaty with perfect good faith, and wishing to be particularly exact in the execution of the article above alluded to, relating to the Indian tribes : The president, in consequence thereof, for that purpose, on the eleventh day of March, eighteen hundred and fifteen, appointed the undersigned William Clark, governor of Missouri territory, Ninian Edwards, governor of Illinois territory, and Auguste Chouteau, esq. of the Missouri territory, commissioners, with full power to conclude a treaty of peace and amity with all those tribes of Indians, conformably to the stipulations contained in the said article, on the part of the United States, in relation to such tribes.

And whereas the commissioners, in conformity with their instructions in the early part of last year, notified the Sacs of Rock river, and the adjacent country, of the time of the ratification of said treaty; of the stipulations it contained in relation to them; of the disposition of the American government to fulfil those stipulations, by entering into a treaty with them, conformably thereto; and invited the said Sacs of Rock river, and the adjacent country, to send forward a deputation of their chiefs to meet the said commissioners at Portage des Sioux, for the purpose of concluding such a treaty as aforesaid, between the United States and the said Indians, and the said Sacs of Rock river, and the adjacent country, having not only declined that friendly overture, but having continued their hostilities, and committed many depredations thereafter, which would have justified the infliction of the severest chastisement upon them; but having earnestly repented of their conduct, now imploring mercy, and being anxious to return to the habits of peace and friendship with the United States; and the latter being always disposed to pursue the most liberal and humane policy towards the Indian tribes within their territory, preferring their reclamation by peaceful measures, to their punishment, by the application of the military force of the nation - Now, therefore,

The said William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners as aforesaid, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors, as aforesaid, for the purpose of restoring peace and friendship between

the parties, do agree to the following articles : Treaty of St. Art. 1. The Sacs of Rock river, and the adjacent country, do hereby Louis, of Nov. unconditionally assent to recognize, re-establish, and confirm the treaty 3, 1804, con

between the United States of America and the united tribes of Sacs
firmed.
Ante, p. 84. and Foxes, which was concluded at St. Louis, on the third day of No

vember, one thousand eight hundred and four; as well as all other con-
tracts and agreements, heretofore made between the Sac tribe or nation,

and the United States. Sacs placed on

Art. 2. The United States agree to place the aforesaid Sacs of Rock
the same foot. river, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war; pro-
ing as before the vided they shall, on or before the first day of July next, deliver up to
war; provided,
&c.

the officer commanding at cantonment Davis, on the Mississippi, all the
property they, or any part of their tribe, have plundered or stolen from
the citizens of the United States, since they were notified, as aforesaid,
of the time of the ratification of the late treaty between the United

States and Great Britain.
Consequences

Art. 3. If the said tribe shall fail or neglect to deliver up the proof a failure or perty aforesaid, or any part thereof, on or before the first day of July neglect to deliaforesaid, they shall forfeit to the United States all right and title to ver up property. their proportion of the annuities which, by the treaty of St. Louis, were

covenanted to be paid to the Sac tribe; and the United States shall for
ever afterwards be exonerated from the payment of so much of said
annuities as, upon a fair distribution, would fall to the share of that
portion of the Sacs who are represented by the undersigned chiefs and

warriors. When to take

Art. 4. This treaty shall take effect and be obligatory on the coneffect.

tracting parties, unless the same shall be disapproved by the president
and senate of the United States, or by the president only: and in the
mean time all hostilities shall cease from this date.
In testimony whereof, the said William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and

Auguste Chouteau, commissioners as aforesaid, and the under-
signed chiefs and warriors as aforesaid, have hereunto set their
hands and affixed their seals, this thirteenth day of May, one thou-
sand eight hundred and sixteen.

WM. CLARK,
NINIAN EDWARDS,

AUGUSTE CHOUTEAU. Anowart, or the one who Speaks, Sakeetoo, the Thunder that Frightens, Namawenane, or Sturgeon Man,

Warpaloka, the Rumbling Thunder, Nasawarku, the Fork,

Kemealosha, the Swan that flies in the Namatchesa, the Jumping Sturgeon,

Rain, Matchequawa, the Bad Axe,

Pashekomack, the Swan that flies low, Mashco, Young Eagle,

Keotasheka, the Running Partridge, Aquaosa, a Lion coming out of the Water, Wapalamo, the White Wolf, Mucketamachekaka, Black Sparrow Caskupwa, the Swan whose wings crack Hawk,

when he flies, Poinaketa, the Cloud that don't stop, Napetaka, he who has a Swan's throat Mealeseta, Bad Weather,

around his neck, Anawashqueth, the Bad Root,

Mashashe, the Fox, Wassekenequa, Sharp-faced Bear, Wapamukqua, the White Bear.

St. Louis, May 13th, 1816. Done in the presence of R. Wash, Secretary to the commission. R. Paul, C. T. of the C. J. Bt. Caron, Samuel Solomon, Interpreters. Joshna Norvell, Judge Adv. M. M. Joseph Perkins. Joseph Charless. B. G. Tavar. Charles Wm. Hunter. Cerré. M. La Croix. Guyol de Guirano. Boo Ingels. Moses Scott. James Sawyer.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

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A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP

Made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, June 1, 1816.

and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners plenipotentiary of the Proclamation, United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said Dec. 30, 1816. states, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs und warriors, representing eight bands of the Siouxs, composing the three tribes called the Siouxs of the Leaf, the Siouxs of the Broad Leaf, and the Siouxs who shoot in the Pine Tops, on the part and behalf of their said tribes, of the other part.

The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribes, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the followering articles :

Art. 1. Every injury or act of hostility, committed by one or either Injuries, &c. of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven forgiven. and forgot.

Art. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all Perpetual the citizens of the United States, and all the individuals composing the peace and aforesaid tribes; and all the friendly relations that existed between them

friendship, &c. before the war shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed.

Art. 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and Former cestheir tribes respectively, do, by these presents, confirm to the United sions, treaties,

&c. confirmed. States all and every cession, or cessions, of land heretofore made by their tribes to the British, French, or Spanish government, within the limits of the United States or their territories; and the parties here contracting do, moreover, in the sincerity of mutual friendship, recognise, re-establish, and confirm, all and every treaty, contract, and agreement, heretofore concluded between the United States and the said tribes or nations. Art. 4. The undersigned chiefs and warriors as aforesaid, for them

Protection of selves and their said tribes, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be U, S. acknowunder the protection of the United States, and of no other nation, ledged. power, or sovereign, whatsoever. In witness whereof, the commissioners aforesaid, and the undersigned

chiefs and warriors as aforesaid, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this first day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixteen, and of the independence of the United States the fortieth.

WILLIAM CLARK,
NINIAN EDWARDS,
AUGUSTE CHOUTEAU.

Tatamanee, the Marching Wind,

Tuquaacundup, the Doctor, Warmadearwar-up, the Man who looks Onudokea, the Fluttering Eagle, at the Calumet Eagle,

Tusarquarp, he that walks with a Cane, Peneshon,

Markpeasena, the Black Cloud, Kanggawachecha, or French Crow, Warksuamanee, the Man who sick Eanggamanee, the Runner,

when he walks,
Tatangascartop, the Playing Buffalo, Otanggamanee, the Man with a strong
Tatanggamarnee, the Walking Buffalo, or

Voice,
Red Wing,

Hungkrehearpee, or the Half of his Body
Warseconta, who shoots in the Pine Gray,
Tops,

Warpearmusee, the Iron Cloud,
Weeshto, the Shoulder,

Etoagungamanee, the White Face,
Warmarnosa, the Thief,

Warchesunsapa, the Negro,
Shutkaongka, the Bird on the Limb, Ehaarp, the Climber,
Shakaska, White Nails,

Nahre, the Shifting Shadow,
Shuskamanee, the Walking Bird, Hapula, the fourth Son,
Manakohomonee, the Turning Iron, Marcawachup, the Dancer,
Oocus, the Watchman,

Shantanggaup, the Big Tree,
Pahataka, the Humming Bird,

Shongkaska, the White Big-eared Dog,
Eachungko, the Man who marches quick, Hasanee, the Buffalo with one Horn,
Medermee, the Muddy Lake,

Narissakata, the Old Man who can hardly
Tatawaka, the Medicine Wind,

Walk,
Warshushasta, the Bad Hail,

Aearpa, the Speaker,
Eoshark, the Belly-Ache,

Muckpeasarp, the Black Cloud.
Done at St. Louis, in the presence of R. Wash, secretary to the commission. R.
Paul, C. T. of the C. Wm. O. Allen, captain United States corps Artillery. H. S.
Geyer. Joshua Norvell, Judge Advocate, M. M. N. Boilvin, agent. Thomas For-
syth, I. agent. Maurice Blondeaux, Sau. agt. Henry Delorier, interpreter. Pierre
Lapointe, interpreter. Samuel Solomon, interpreter. Jacques Mette, interpreter.
Cerré. Richard Cave. Willi Cave. Julius Pescay.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP

June 3, 1816. Made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, Proclamation,

and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners plenipotentiary of the Dec. 30, 1816. United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said

states, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors of that portion of the Winnebago tribe or nation residing on the Ouisconsin river, of the other part.

Whereas the undersigned chiefs and warriors, as well as that portion of the nation which they represent, have separated themselves from the rest of their nation, and reside in a village on the Ouisconsin river, and are desirous of returning to a state of friendly relations with the United

States, the parties hereto have agreed to the following articles : Injuries, &c. Art. 1. Every injury or act of hostility, committed by one or either forgiven. of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven

and forgot; and all the friendly relations that existed between them

before the late war, shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed. Former ces

Art. 2. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and sions, treaties, those they represent, do, by these presents, confirm to the United States &c. confirmed. all and every cession of land heretofore made by their nation to the

British, French, or Spanish government, within the limits of the United
States, or their territories; and also, all and every treaty, contract, and

agreement, heretofore concluded between the United States and the said tribe or nation, as far as their interest in the same extends.

Art. 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors as aforesaid, for them- Protection of selves and those they represent, do hereby acknowledge themselves to U.S. acknowbe under the protection of the United States, and of no other nation, ledged. power, or sovereign, whatsoever.

Art. 4. The aforesaid chiefs and warriors, for themselves and those Indians to re. they represent, do further promise to remain distinct and separate from main distinct the rest of their tribe or nation, giving them no aid or assistance what- from the rest of

their tribe. ever, until peace shall also be concluded between the United States and the said tribe or nation.

Art. 5. The contracting parties do hereby agree, promise, and oblige Prisoners to themselves, reciprocally, to deliver up all prisoners now in their hands be delivered up. (by what means soever the same may have come into their possession) to the officer commanding at Prairie du Chien, to be by him restored to the respective parties hereto, as soon as it may be practicable. In witness whereof, the commissioners aforesaid, and the undersigned

chiefs and warriors as aforesaid, have hereunto subscribed their names, and affixed their seals, this third day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixteen and of the independence of the United States the fortieth.

WM. CLARK,
NINIAN EDWARDS,
AUG. CHOUTEAU.

Choukeka, or Dekare, the spoon,

Shougkapar, the Dog, Onunaka, or Karamanu,

Nekousaka, the Main Channel, Achahouska, the White Sky,

Wapanonekee, the Bear, Chenapinka, the Good House,

Opwarchick waka, the Rain, Makabka, the Earth,

Chepurganika, the Little Buffalo Head. Wechoka, the Green Feather,

Done at St. Louis, in the presence of R. Wash, secretary to the commission. R. Paul, C. T. of the C. Wm. O. Allen, captain U. S. Corps of Artillery. N. Boilvin, agent. Thomas Forsyth, I. agent. Maurice Blondeaux, agent. Henry Delorier, Pierre Lapointe, Baptiste Pereault, Samuel Solomon, and Jacques Mette, Interpreters.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

Made and entered into at Fort Harrison, in the Indiana Terri

June 4, 1816. tory between Benjamin Parke, specially authorized thereto by

Proclamation, the president of the United States, of the one part, and the Dec. 30, 1816. tribes of Indians called the Weas and Kickapoos, by their chiefs and head men, of the other part.

Art. 1. The Weas and Kickapoos again acknowledge themselves in Peace and peace and friendship with the United States.

friendship Art. 2. The said tribes acknowledge the validity of, and declare Treaty of their determination to adhere to, the treaty of Greenville, made in the Greenville conyear seventeen hundred and ninety-five, and all subsequent treaties firmed. which they have respectively made with the United States.

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