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The Army of Scotland marches into England - - -

Monk declares for a free Parliament; General Election of

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Characters of the Duke of York and Earl of Clarendon -
General Election of 1661; Violence of the Cavaliers '

new Parliament - - - - - -

Persecution of the Puritans - - - - -

Zeal of the Church for hereditary Monarchy - - -

Change in the Morals of the Community - - -

Profligacy of Politicians - - - - .

State of Scotland - - - - - -

State of Ireland - - - - - .

The Government becomes unpopular in England - -

War with the Dutch - - - - - -

Opposition in the House of Commons - - -

Fall of Clarendon - - - - _ _

State of European Politics, and Ascendency of France -

Character of Lewis XIV. - - . . -

The Triple Alliance - - > - . - _

The Country Party - - - - _ _

Connection between Charles II. and France - - -

Views of Lewis with respect to England - - -

Treaty of Dover - - - . - ;

Nature of the English Cabinet - . - -

The Cabal - - - - - - .

Shutting of the Exchequer - - - - _

War with the United Provinces, and their extreme Danger -

William, Prince of Orange - - - - .

Meeting of the Parliament - - . - .

Declaration of Indulgence - - - - .

It is cancelled, and the Test Act passe - - .

VOL. I ' a

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Great Change in the State of England since 1685 .

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Population of England in 1685 - - . _

Increase of Population greater in the North than in the South

Revenue in 1685 - - . _ _

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HISTORY OF ENGLAND.

CHAPTER I.

I PURPOSE to write the history of England from the

accession of King James the Second down to a time which is within the memory of men still living. I shall recount the errors which, in a few months, alienated a loyal gentry and priesthood froin the House of Stuart. I shall trace the course of that revolution which terminated the long struggle between our sovereigns and their parliaments, and bound up together the rights of the people and the title of the reigning dynasty. I shall relate how the new settlement was, during many troubled years, successfully defended against foreign and domestic enemies; how, under that settlement, the authority of law and the security of property were found to be compatible with a liberty of discussion and of individual action never before known; how, from the auspicious union of order and freedom, sprang a prosperity of which the annals of human affairs had furnished no example; how our country, from a. state of ignomim'ous vassalage, rapidly rose to the place of umpire among European powers; how her opulence and her martial glory grew together; how, by wise and resolute good faith, was gradually established a public credit fruitful of marvels which to the states— men of any former age would have seemed incredible; how a gigantic commerce gave birth to a maritime

VOL. I. n ‘

Introduction.

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