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organization ; that it grows with the brain, and with the brain ceases to exist ? We see, indeed, that the cerebral mass and the mind are so intimately united, that the state of the former uniformly influences that of the latter ; that the brain and the mind are developed together, and together decay; that, when brain is perfect, so is mind, and vice versa ; and that when the organization of the brain is injured by disease or deteriorated by age, insanity or second childhood are (is) the result. But let us not be deceived by this; the brain may still be the organ merely of mind, as the eye is of vision. If, in old age, the hu. mours of the eye lose their transparency, it may become unfit for its office, but light does not the less exist; and in the same way, when dotage comes on, the brain does its duty imperfectly, but mind may still be in its real nature as perfect as ever, though the bodily organ has become unfit for it to operate with. But I will quit this subject, by remarking, that however much we may argue, whatever doubts and uncertainties may arise, whatever we may be told by speculative theorists, we know nothing of mind but by its operations. If a particle of light travel two hundred thousand miles in a second of time, the disembodied soul may, with equal velocity, fly to its future place of abode in the illimitable concave around us. As the most distant orbs are connected by gravitation, so it may be that, between mind and the Omnipotent Creator of all, there exists a connection as powerful, as certain, and possibly more permanent, than the attraction between worlds and systems. Without the eye we could know nothing of light, and without the brain we could know nothing of mind; but the eye is not light, nor the brain thought. They are both but organs. God is the source of light, and the source of mind, and he alone can truly know either. Let us therefore leave the settlement of these insoluble diffi. culties to him, for our faculties in this life are incompetent to the task. All things, I doubt not, will at length be made plain ; and in the mean time let us be humble ; let us be grateful for the powers we en. joy ; let us be anxious for truth; and let us lay opinions, merely as such, aside ; let us cultivate all moral virtue ; let us adore the Almighty; and let us give up disputation and wrangling about things which he alone can understand.' pp. 186--189.

There is so much good sense in these remarks, that we cannot but deeply regret the moral blindness of the Writer to the true light, the light of the glorious Gospel of Christ.

Mrs. Hack is a teacher of a far different school; and a few paragraphs from her highly interesting and well written volume, will convey a sufficient idea of the competent manner in which the subject is treated. Harry Beaufoy inquires of his mother, how philosophers could be absolutely certain that the earth was once Auid. The conversation then proceeds as follows.

6“ It is not an affair of certainty, Harry; but there are some peculiarities in the structure of the earth, which, independently of its external shape, afford strong reasons for believing it. If you like, I will endeavour to explain some of them; and may begin by saying that

YOL. VII.-N.S.

sandssent, be still seems to be ignorant. It is unnecessari = ST, that the assertion respecting the numerous believers I Janea among the clergy, is an impudent falsehood. One cle.

tran, we believe, did profess his belief in her mission; a thish D. mure surprising than that, of our learned Oriental scholars coe shoc'd have discarded Christianity for Hindooism, and an

cha prđa the claims of 'the illustrious Mohammed' to those the Son of God. Had Dx Dr. Drummond thus flippantly obtruded upon us bis

Set animosity against the Christian faith, we should have frido dipstica io catechise him respecting his creed ; and but for the highly exceptionable passages referred to, should have te pleasure in recommending his volume for the instruction it excus Darwithstanding its negative faults or deficiencies. This och so be the spirit and tendency of the course of studies

recea the Be fast Academical Institution, we are less suir e stered to learn.

Rice we miss the present volume, we shall cite a passage. it which it is somewhat curious to find a Deist arguing agues De ase avaclusions of the Materialist.

Now, with regard to mind, I would ask, Suppose it to be even mies and bar Egåt, mas it not still be material? It mas, ar

IT IR; God is the eas judge of this; no man can tell; and te to De La Beads are what the essential nature of our soul is Web : Te bare a mind, a thinking principle, something inde XDA: cze intimate r annected with, organization. The ere vo Tety Bars and olours of external objects to the brain, we aan16 b i ed, but the ere does not see; and the brain contets the Im as to the mind; but the brain is as blind as the ere, that is the engin of comunication with the mind in its essential III e sicrisor immaterial. We know nothing, and can DAT De getoe n tinate nature of mind; but it seems to be a nae

t at it is immortal ; it is a persuasion found in almost NOT I .a, and it is a conclusion which natural religion inevitativ en A lbeere that the study of God in his works, stamps an i

enotica ones that there is a future state, and that our X Y t re opir prenantory to others of a superior Order, VII. We se reordre de caracities, and have more extensive IRAN & Rex and understanding the works and ways of the Al

T. Mate r can understand her we shall exist, for we can * TDA und wide ligat, brits present phenomena. But we see Sa i s a nature in quanction, her different kingdoms joining I Darprije des so that it is impossible to tell exactly where Vor anis sina anda beyins; and we also see, that the worlds which sich. Die eens are s au nected br the unseen tie of gravitation; meg wated, al is in harment and union. And is the mental

CM Daste. Can we believe that the mind, like a taper, will de ei ane de dus ir ener: Taat it is merely a temporary result of Organization ; that it grows with the brain, and with the brain ceases

o exist? We see, indeed, that the cerebral mass and the mind are so

intimately united, that the state of the former uniformly influences C hat of the latter; that the brain and the mind are developed together, 2. band together decay; that, when brain is perfect, so is mind, and vice ceversa ; and that when the organization of the brain is injured by dis

zase or deteriorated by age, insanity or second childhood are (is) the result. But let us not be deceived by this; the brain may still be the

organ merely of mind, as the eye is of vision. If, in old age, the hu. . mours of the eye lose their transparency, it may become unfit for its

office, but light does not the less exist; and in the same way, when

dotage comes on, the brain does its duty imperfectly, but mind may :** still be in its real nature as perfect as ever, though the bodily organ

has become unfit for it to operate with. But I will quit this subject, by remarking, that however much we may argue, whatever doubts and uncertainties may arise, whatever we may be told by speculative theorists, : we know nothing of mind but by its operations. If a particle of light travel two hundred thousand miles in a second of time, the disembodied soul may, with equal velocity, fly to its future place of abode in the illimitable concave around us. As the most distant orbs are connected by gravitation, so it may be that, between mind and the Omnipotent Creator of all, there exists a connection as powerful, as certain, and possibly more permanent, than the attraction between worlds and systems. Without the eye we could know nothing of light, and without the brain we could know nothing of mind; but the eye is not light, nor the brain thought. They are both but organs. God is the source of light, and the source of mind, and he alone can truly know either. Let us therefore leave the settlement of these insoluble diff. culties to him, for our faculties in this life are incompetent to the task. All things, I doubt not, will at length be made plain ; and in the mean time let us be humble ; let us be grateful for the powers we enjoy ; let us be anxious for truth ; and let us lay opinions, merely as such, aside ; let us cultivate all moral virtue ; let us adore the Almighty; and let us give up disputation and wrangling about things which he alone can understand.' pp. 186-189.

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There is so much good sense in these remarks, that we cannot but deeply regret the moral blindness of the Writer to the true light, the light of the glorious Gospel of Christ.'

Mrs. Hack is a teacher of a far different school; and a few paragraphs from her highly interesting and well written volume, will convey a sufficient idea of the competent manner in which the subject is treated. Harry Beaufoy inquires of his mother, how philosophers could be absolutely certain that the earth was once Auid. The conversation then proceeds as follows.

"" It is not an affair of certainty, Harry; but there are some peculiarities in the structure of the earth, which, independently of its external shape, afford strong reasons for believing it. If you like, I will endeavour to explain some of them; and may begin by saying that

yol. VII.-N.S.

mandment, he still seems to be ignorant. It is unnecessary to say, that the assertion respecting the numerous believers in Joanna among the clergy, is an impudent falsehood. One clergyman, we believe, did profess his belief in her mission; a thing not more surprising than that, of our learned Oriental scholars, one should have discarded Christianity for Hindooism, and ananother prefer the claims of the illustrious Mohammed' to those of the Son of God.

Had not Dr. Drummond thus flippantly obtruded upon us his malignant animosity against the Christian faith, we should have felt no disposition to catechise him respecting his creed ; and but for the highly exceptionable passages referred to, should have felt pleasure in recommending his volume for the instruction it contains, notwithstanding its negative faults or deficiencies. That such should be the spirit and tendency of the course of studies pursued in the Belfast Academical Institution, we are less surprised than grieved to learn.

Before we dismiss the present volume, we shall cite a passage, in which it is somewhat curious to find a Deist arguing against the dogmatic conclusions of the Materialist.

"Now, with regard to mind, I would ask, Suppose it to be even more attenuated than light, may it not still be material? It may, or it may not ; God is the only judge of this; no man can tell; and the truth is, no man needs care what the essential nature of our soul is. We know that we have a mind, a thinking principle, something independent of, though intimately connected with, organization. The eye conveys the forms and colours of external objects to the brain, we can. not tell how, indeed, but the eye does not see ; and the brain convers these impressions to the mind; but the brain is as blind as the eye, though it is the organ of communication with the mind in its essential form, whether material or immaterial. We know nothing, and can know nothing of the ultimate nature of mind; but it seems to be a natural feeling, that it is immortal; it is a persuasion found in almost every nation, and it is a conclusion which natural religion inevitably brings us to. I believe that the study of God in his works, stamps an irresistible conviction on us that there is a future state, and that our present pursuits are only preparatory to others of a superior order, when we shall receive higher capacities, and have more extensive means of seeing and understanding the works and ways of the Almighty. But he only can understand how we shall exist, for we can now only know mind, like light, by its present phenomena. But we see all the parts of nature in connection, her different kingdoms joining by imperceptible degrees, so that it is impossible to tell exactly where one ends, and another begins; and we also see, that the worlds which form the heavens are all connected by the unseen tie of gravitation ; nothing is isolated, all is in harmony and union. And is the mental world not so too? Can we believe that the mind, like a taper, will die out and be lost for ever? That it is merely a temporary result of organization ; that it grows with the brain, and with the brain ceases to exist ? We see, indeed, that the cerebral mass and the mind are so intimately united, that the state of the former uniformly influences that of the latter; that the brain and the mind are developed together, and together decay; that, when brain is perfect, so is mind, and vice versâ ; and that when the organization of the brain is injured by disease or deteriorated by age, insanity or second childhood are (is) the result. But let us not be deceived by this; the brain may still be the organ merely of mind, as the eye is of vision. If, in old age, the humours of the eye lose their transparency, it may become unfit for its office, but light does not the less exist; and in the same way, when dotage comes on, the brain does its duty imperfectly, but mind may still be in its real nature as perfect as ever, though the bodily organ has become unfit for it to operate with. But I will quit this subject, by remarking, that however much we may argue, whatever doubts and uncertainties may arise, whatever we may be told by speculative theorists, we know nothing of mind but by its operations. If a particle of light travel two hundred thousand miles in a second of time, the disembodied soul may, with equal velocity, fly to its future place of abode in the illimitable concave around us. As the most distant orbs are connected by gravitation, so it may be that, between mind and the Omnipotent Creator of all, there exists a connection as powerful, as certain, and possibly more permanent, than the attraction between worlds and systems. Without the eye we could know nothing of light, and without the brain we could know nothing of mind; but the eye is not light, nor the brain thought. They are both but organs. God is the source of light, and the source of mind, and he alone can truly know either. Let us therefore leave the settlement of these insoluble difficulties to him, for our faculties in this life are incompetent to the task. All things, I doubt not, will at length be made plain; and in the mean time let us be humble ; let us be grateful for the powers we enjoy ; let us be anxious for truth; and let us lay opinions, merely as such, aside ; let us cultivate all moral virtue; let us adore the Almighty; and let us give up disputation and wrangling about things which he alone can understand.' pp. 186-189.

There is so much good sense in these remarks, that we cannot but deeply regret the moral blindness of the Writer to the true . light, the light of the glorious Gospel of Christ.'

Mrs. Hack is a teacher of a far different school; and a few paragraphs from her highly interesting and well written volume, will convey a sufficient idea of the competent manner in which the subject is treated. Harry Beaufoy inquires of his mother, how philosophers could be absolutely certain that the earth was once Auid. The conversation then proceeds as follows.

«« It is not an affair of certainty, Harry; but there are some peculiarities in the structure of the earth, which, independently of its external shape, afford strong reasons for believing it. If you like, I will endeavour to explain some of them; and may begin by saying that

YOL. VIL-N.S.

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