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which the Author has conducted us, the volume is highly valuable from the light which it throws upon the European idioms in general, and on the laws, if not the origin, of those variations which form a principal source of perplexity in philological inquiries.

Art. III.-1. The Family Cabinet Atlas, constructed upon an Original

Plan, and engraved on Steel by Mr. Thomas Starling. Cabinet size.

97 maps. Price 30s. plain. 42s. coloured. London, 1831. 2. The Biblical Series of the Family Cabinet Atlas. Parts I. to VI.

2s. 6d. each ; 3s. 6d. coloured. London, 1831, 1832. THE first Number of this Cabinet Atlas was noticed in our

I Journal on its publication; and we then gave our opinion as to the merits of the plan. We are now able to speak with entire approbation of the admirable care, taste, and skill displayed in the execution. The distinctness of delineation preserved in these geographical miniatures, is surprising. Nothing contributes so much to give a clear idea of the general structure of a country, as a boldness and precision in marking the course of the rivers ; and this forms a striking feature of these little maps. The character of the surface, as plain or mountainous, is also carefully indicated. But the great advantage of this cabinet atlas, is, that it brings at once within the compass of the eye, the general outline, situation, and relative geography of a country or kingdom, so as to imprint it on the memory of a tyro or youthful learner, better than by the bewildering expanse of a map of larger dimensions. It serves also as a sort of geographical remembrancer of easy reference; and though, of course, it will not render larger maps less indispensable for the purposes of historical illustration and topographical study, it is well adapted to promote a taste for the study of geography, by the attractive shape so cleverly given to these delineations of its outlines. It will thus not only diffuse very widely a certain degree of important general information, but may lead to a more intelligent and frequent use of maps on a larger scale. We have been particularly pleased with the Tabular Maps, exhibiting the comparative heights of mountains, lengths of rivers, and extent of inland seas and lakes. These have been carefully reduced from large drawings; and small as is the scale, they give an admirable view of the relative proportions. The volume forms a very elegant and useful present; but we cannot understand why a work of such perennial use, should have been advertised as a ' geographical annual.'

The Biblical Series has been apparently compiled with equal pains; and it is not Mr. Starling's fault, if they are more ornamental than useful. From the imposing effect of light and shade, the tasteful distribution of chains and groupes of mountains, and the pretty meanders of black line all over the country, the unidformed reader might be led to suppose, that Syria, Asia Minor, and Mesopotamia had been subjected to an accurate survey, the ancient sites all identified, and the true bearings and elevations ascertained by scientific observation. How great must be his surprise at learning, that scarcely any part of the whole country has been actually surveyed, and only a small portion of it even traversed by Europeans that the sites of Gath, Eleutheropolis (from which Jerome and Eusebius estimate the distances of other cities), Beersheba, Dan, Zabulon, Jotapata, and other important places, have not been ascertained ;-—that the widest discrepancies occur in the accounts given by travellers, of the extent of the Dead Sea and the Sea of Tiberias, and of other equally important features of the holy land ;-—that Dr. E. D. Clarke could not find his way to Sebaste, the capital of Samaria;--that, as the greater part of Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, and Armenia remains unexplored by European travellers, that the geography of those countries is more than one-half made up of doubtful calculations and hypotheses. We make no objection against constructing theoretic maps of unknown countries; but still, we would not ał. fect to fill up the outline with apocryphal details, and to make rivers wind, and mountains rise, ad libitum. A map is none the better for looking like a picture; and some indication ought to distinguish what is known from what is matter of conjecture. What we should have preferred, would have been, duplicate maps of each portion of country; one map exhibiting the present divisions and names, as well as variations of surface, so far as actually known, and the other, the ancient geography only, as laid down by the learned, with no attempt at embellishment. In the map of the kingdom of David and Solomon, we are pleased to see the remarkable valley extending from the Dead Sea to the Gulf of Akaba, called El Ghor, properly indicated; but why not in all ? Bozra, in the Haouran, the capital of the Roman Arabia Prorincia, and the other cities recently identified by the labours of Burckhardt, Irby and Mangles, Bankes, and Buckingham, should also be noticed. The beds of summer torrents, which are entirely dry except during the rains, ought not to be marked in the same way as rivers. With the exception of the Jordan and its head waters, there is scarcely a stream in Judea, that can be called a river, all being mere brooks or torrents. Dr. Clarke describes the plain of Esdraelon as one vast meadow nearly 50 miles in length, and 20 in breadth, without a house or tree to break the monotonous level. If this account has any approximation to accuracy, so remarkable a feature of the country ought to be clearly marked. While, however, we throw out these hints, we must

· Vr. Starling the justice to say, that he has carefully availed

himself of the labours of his predecessors; and some of his maps, especially Plates 11, 19, 22, and 23, do him great credit: they are quite gems. The map pretending to shew the primitive settlements of the descendants of Noah, we should cancel. What can be more absurd than to assign Africa and Arabia to Ham, and India and China to Shem? But this is a venerable error, which it might be deemed sacrilegious to destroy!

Art. IV.-1. The Polymicrian Greek Lexicon to the New Testament ;

in which the various Senses of the Words are distinctly explained in English, and authorized by References to Passages of Scripture. By W. Greenfield, Editor of " Bagster's Comprehensive Bible,” &c. 32mo. cc. 508. London, 1829. Novi Testamenti Græci Tameion ; aliis Concordantiæ, ita concinnatum, ut et Locos reperiendi, et Vocum veras Significationes, et Significationum Diversitates per Collationem investigandi, Ducis instar esse possit. Ex Opera Erasmi Schmidii depromtum. A Gulielmo Greenfield. 32mo. pp. 727. Price 6s. London, 1830. THESE two beautiful little specimens of typography, worthy

of the Elzevirs of other days, have only recently fallen under our notice. They now possess, in addition to their intrinsic value, a monumental interest, as specimens of the editorial accuracy and laborious diligence of the amiable and gifted individual under whose superintendence they appeared. When we first cast our eye upon the miniature volume which professes to comprise Schmidt's Concordance, we could not conceive by what means the promise of the title-page could be honestly fulfilled. But, by omitting the unimportant proper names, the indeclinable particles, the pronouns, and the verb substantive; by substituting simple references for citation, when the word occurs only four or five times, or when there are two or more passages strictly parallel, in which case one only is given, and the others are referred to;alterations which detract nothing from the usefulness of the edition ;-the ponderous labours of Stephens and Schmidt are here screwed into something less than a pocket volume; and what is more, for 6s. the Biblical student may possess himself of a work at one time scarce and dear, in a form that will take up no room on his table, and which ought scarcely ever to be off of it. The edition followed is that of 1638, printed at Wittenberg. The Glasgow edition of 1821, in 2 Vols. 8vo., merits praise for its accuracy; and its type is of course better suited to eyes that are somewhat the worse for wear, than a miniature edition can be. The printing of the present volume is, however, admirably clear; and we are happy to be able to add, that, with both editions at hand, we find the smaller one suit our eyes (without spectacles) so well as to prefer it for convenience.

the tasteful distribution of chains and groupes of monntains, and the pretty meanders of black line all over the country, the uninformed reader might be led to suppose, that Syria, Asia Minor, and Mesopotamia had been subjected to an accurate survey, the ancient sites all identified, and the true bearings and elevations ascertained by scientific observation. How great must be his surprise at learning, that scarcely any part of the whole country has been actually surveyed, and only a small portion of it even traversed by Europeans that the sites of Gath, Eleutheropolis (from which Jerome and Eusebius estimate the distances of other cities), Beersheba, Dan, Zabulon, Jotapata, and other important places, have not been ascertained ;-that the widest discrepancies occur in the accounts given by travellers, of the extent of the Dead Sea and the Sea of Tiberias, and of other equally important features of the holy land ;-that Dr. E. D. Clarke could not find his way to Sebaste, the capital of Samaria;—that, as the greater part of Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, and Armenia remains unexplored by European travellers, that the geography of those countries is more than one-half made up of doubtful calculations and hypotheses. We make no objection against constructing theoretic maps of unknown countries; but still, we would not affect to fill up the outline with apocryphal details, and to make rivers wind, and mountains rise, ad libitum. A map is none the better for looking like a picture; and some indication ought to distinguish what is known from what is matter of conjecture. What we should have preferred, would have been, duplicate maps of each portion of country; one map exhibiting the present divisions and names, as well as variations of surface, so far as actually known, and the other, the ancient geography only, as laid down by the learned, with no attempt at embellishment. In the map of the kingdom of David and Solomon, we are pleased to see the remarkable valley extending from the Dead Sea to the Gulf of Akaba, called El Ghor, properly indicated; but why not in all ? Bozra, in the Haouran, the capital of the Roman Arabia Prorincia, and the other cities recently identified by the labours of Burckhardt, Irby and Mangles, Bankes, and Buckingham, should also be noticed. The beds of summer torrents, which are entirely dry except during the rains, ought not to be marked in the same way as rivers. With the exception of the Jordan and its head waters, there is scarcely a stream in Judea, that can be called a river, all being mere brooks or torrents. Dr. Clarke describes the plain of Esdraelon as one vast meadow nearly 50 miles in length, and 20 in breadth, without a house or tree to break the monotonous level. If this account has any approximation to accuracy, so remarkable a feature of the country ought to be clearly marked. While, however, we throw out these hints, we must do Mr. Starling the justice to say, that he has carefully availed

himself of the labours of his predecessors; and some of his maps, especially Plates 11, 19, 22, and 23, do him great credit: they are quite gems. The map pretending to shew the primitive settlements of the descendants of Noah, we should cancel. What can be more absurd than to assign Africa and Arabia to Ham, and India and China to Shem? But this is a venerable error, which it might be deemed sacrilegious to destroy!

Art. IV.–1. The Polymicrian Greek Lexicon to the New Testament ;

in which the various Senses of the Words are distinctly explained in English, and authorized by References to Passages of Scripture. By W. Greenfield, Editor of " Bagster's Comprehensive Bible,” &c.

32mo. cc. 508. London, 1829. 2. Novi Testamenti Græci Tameion ; aliis Concordantiæ, ita con

cinnatum, ut et Locos reperiendi, et Vocum veras Significationes, et Significationum Diversitates per Collationem investigandi, Ducis instar esse possit. Ex Opera Erasmi Schmidii depromtum. A

Gulielmo Greenfield. 32mo. pp. 727. Price 6s. London, 1830. THESE two beautiful little specimens of typography, worthy

of the Elzevirs of other days, have only recently fallen under our notice. They now possess, in addition to their intrinsic value, a monumental interest, as specimens of the editorial accuracy and laborious diligence of the amiable and gifted individual under whose superintendence they appeared. When we first cast our eye upon the miniature volume which professes to comprise Schmidt's Concordance, we could not conceive by what means the promise of the title-page could be honestly fulfilled. But, by omitting the unimportant proper names, the indeclinable particles, the pronouns, and the verb substantive; by substituting simple references for citation, when the word occurs only four or five times, or when there are two or more passages strictly parallel, in which case one only is given, and the others are referred to ;alterations which detract nothing from the usefulness of the edition ;-the ponderous labours of Stephens and Schmidt are here screwed into something less than a pocket volume; and what is more, for 6s. the Biblical student may possess himself of a work at one time scarce and dear, in a form that will take up no room on his table, and which ought scarcely ever to be off of it. The edition followed is that of 1638, printed at Wittenberg. The Glasgow edition of 1821, in 2 Vols. 8vo., merits praise for its accuracy; and its type is of course better suited to eyes that are somewhat the worse for wear, than a miniature edition can be. The printing of the present volume is, however, admirably clear; and we are happy to be able to add, that, with both editions at hand, we find the smaller one suit our eyes (without spectacles) so well as to prefer it for convenience.

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