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and observance of the Christian sabbath,

281; character of the work, 310. Materialism, eramination of, 168. Methodism, national importance of, 97. Milner's history of the seven churches of

Asia, 510; Thyatira, 511. Missionaries, treatment of those in Jamaica,

253. Modern sabbath examined, 281 ; silence of

the author on previously published works, 283; the moral tendency of a doctrine an element of the internal evidence of its truth, 284; value of a periodical day of rest, 285; inconsistency of the author, 286; consequences of his reasoning, 288; his notions of social rights, 290; the political question, 291; the right of the legislature to enforce the sabbath,

294; animadversions, 307. Morea, the, state of, 507. Morison's Christian pastor visiting his

flock, 276.

stitution, 471 ; definitions of the British constitution, 472; character of the author, 474 ; parliamentary corruption, 475; the reforın bill, 476 ; reformers not theorists, 477 ; Burke's character of the house of conimons, 478; reasons for reform, 479; character of this work,

494. Sec North American Review. Parliaments, gradual formation of, 485. Pesulential cholera. See Copland. Pitcairn islanders, the, 278. Pledges for representatives, 491. Poland, Homer, and other Poems, 44+;

Poland, 445; appeal to France and

Britain, +46. Political economy. See Cooper and

Whately. Prison discipline, eighth report of the committee of the society for the improvement of, 313; number of criminal offenders, ib.; increase of crime, 314; causes of the increase, 316; magisterial incapacity, 317; proportion of crime in different counties, 316; remedies for moral and political disorder, 320; inefficiency of the

criminal law, 321; state of gaols, 323. Pritchard on the eastern origin of the Cel

tic nations, 145; result of philological researches in determining the origin of the human race, 146; relative position of the European races, 148; the Celtæ, 150; relations between various languages, 151; affinity between the Celtic dialects and the Sanscrit, 153.

National character. See Chenevix. Nature, advantages to the young, in the

study of, 165. Neander's church history, translated by

H. J. Rose, 461; Lord King's inquiry into the primitive church, and the reply to it, 462; import of the term church, 463; requisites in a church bistorian, 464; character of Gibbon, 465; description of Neander's work, ib.; his character of Apollonius of Tyana, 466; church

government, 468. Neilgherry bills. See Harkness and

Hough. New books, 96, 552. 280. 368. 460. 188. Newspapers, character of, 139, Niger, the. See Lander. Nonconformity. See Vevers. North American review, 32; inequality of

condition in America, ib.; consequence of the extension of suffrage, and the adoption of the ballot in America, 34; difference in the bases of the English and American constitutions, 35.

- on reform, 481; character of the reform bill, 483; principle of the house of commons, 484; gradual formation of parliaments, 455; the right of governing, a trust, 497; the principle of prescription, ib.; reasons for disfranchisement, 459; instructed and pledged representatives, 491; guide of the representatives' conduct, 492; results of the reform bill, 493. See Park,

Reform, reasons and results of. See

Park. Religion the bond of society, 228. Religious instruction, means of, 115. Report of the general union (New York)

for promoting the observance of the

Christian sabbath, 281. Representatives, obligation, &c, of, 492.

Sabbath question, the, a question of civil

and religious liberty, 282. See modern sabbath examined; Davies; Burder;

Wardlaw; Wilson; Gurney, Sacred offering, the, a poetical annual, 89;

the condemned, ib.; public executions, 92. Saturday evening, by the author of the na

tural history of enthusiasm, 172 ; design and contents of the work, ib. ; vastness of the material universe no ground for irreligious scepticism, 174; decrepitude of the leading superstitions of the nations, 177; aspect of society in regard to religiin, 180; the other writings of the au

thor, 186. Sclavonian women compared with the Irish,

73.

O'Connell, Daniel, portrait of, 73.
Park's, professor J. J., dogmas of the con-

Scripturel education in Ireland, 363. Scriptures, circulation of, in Greece, 501. Sibree's expostulatory letter to the bishop

of Lichfield and Coventry, 87. Simeon's four sermons on the offices of the

Holy Spirit, 36; errors and heresies in the church for the purpose of moral dis. cipline, 37; character of the present times, 38 ; inquiries as to the primitive heresies, 39; character of those now existing, 40; variation in the difficulties of religion, 41; the work of the Spirit a stumbling-block, 42; modern pretensions

to the gift of miracles and tongues, ib. Sin, its existence under the divine govern

ment, 213. Sismondi's history of the Italian republics

(Lardner's Cabinet Cyclopædia), 276. Spain and Portugal, history of, (Lardner's

Cabinet Cyclopædia,) 441; difficulties allending such a history, ib.; social effects of Christianity, 442; character of Abuer

rahman III, 443. Starling's family cabinet atlas, 157 ; biblical

series of, ib. Swan's idolatry, 355; general distaste for

poetry, ib; character of this work, 356; extracts, ib.

tions, 105; dissenting academies, 106 ; incomes of dissenting ministers, 107; analogy between the established clergy and the dissenting ministry now, compared with that of the possessioned church and the mendicant orders in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, 110; relative position of the established and nonestablished churches, 114; proportion of the means of religious instruction to the British population, 115; national importance of methodism, 119; the voluntary system of religious teaching eramined, 125, 126; church property, 128; the tithe system, 129; the utility of religious establishments, 130; tendency to division in voluntary churches, 133; evils of these divisions, 134 ; present aspect of the religious world, 135 ; position of the congregational dissenters, 137; literary character of dissenters, 138; the public press, 139; religious newspapers, 140; character of dissenting preachers, 141; public labours of the dissenters,

142. Vestry library, 527. Village preaching, Robert Hall's defence of,

411. Voluntary system, the. See Vevers.

Tahiti and the Pitcairn islanders, 278. Taylor's records of a good man's life, 345;

difficulty of reviewing sermons and tales, ib.; character of the writer, 346; sketch of the hero's early life, 346 ; a college recollection, 348, defect in the religious character of the present day, 349; defence of poetry or fiction as a vehicle of

truth, 350. Taylor's may you like it, 345. Taylor's (Emily) tales of the Saxons, 550. Theological library, 528. Thyatira, description of, 511. Tiptaft's letter to the bishop of Salisbury,

97. Tongues, gift of. See Beverley. Trinitarian bible society. See Bible So

ciety.

Wales, mountain region of, 70.
Wardlaw's discourses on the sabbath, 281;

perpeluity of the sabbath, 299; political obligation of the sabbath, 301 ; province and duty of the legislature, 303; charac

ter of the work, 309. Whately's (archbishop) tract on the sab

bath, 282. - - lectures on political economy, 1; nature and objects of political economy, ib.; denomination of the science, 2; fallacies by which its progress has been retarded, 3; Paine's definitions of society and government, 6; Buonaparte's antipathy to polilical economy, 7; pretenders to knowledge, 8 ; fallacies of Mr. Ricardo, 9; Dr. Whately and Mr. Senior, 10; character of Dr. Whately's lectures, 11; the existence of natural evil, 12; origin of civilization, ib.; the influence of wealth and knowledge on national morals, 13; checks to national prosperity, 15; evils of a minute division of labour, ib. ; value of education in domestic economy, 17; importance of universal edu

cation, 18. Wilks's letters on the Bible society question,

451; tactics of the Sackville-street party,

452. Williams's art in nature, and science antici

pated, 542.

Unitarianism, characteristics of, 206.

Vevers's essay on the national importance

of methodism, 97; progression of methodism, ib.; era of nonconformity, 98 ; decline of the presbyterians, ib.; secessions from the dissenters in the reign of George II.; 99; state of religion among the dissenters at the beginning of the eighteenth century, 100; origin of the Honierton institution, 101; state of the establishment at the era of methodism, 104; increase of dissenting congrega

Wilson's (Rev. D.) evidences of Christian

ity, 48; agents of evil productive of good, ib. ; advantages resulting from the opposition offered to Christianity, 49; character of this work, 50; imperfect character of works on the evidences of Christianity, 52; remarks on the priori mode of treating the evidences, 53 ; remarks on natural religion, 54; ancient and modern deists, 55 ; causes of their difference, ib. ; the question of supernatural communication, 56; proper subject of examination in reference to the evidences of Christianity, ib.; mode of inquiry prescribed, 57; authenticity of the New Testament, ib.; preservation of the Jews a proof of Christ's predictions, 59; nature and tendencies of Christianity strong proofs of its divine origin, 61; hinderances that impede the full effects of the Christian religion, 62 ; secular alliances injurious to Christianity, 63; trial of Christianity from erperience, 65; un

reasonavkriess y muje. No, Rush

interpretation of the same. Wilson's (Rev.D.) divine authority and per

petual obligation of the Lord's day asserted, 281; character of the work, 309.

-- evidences of Christianity, stated in a popular and practical

manner, 361. Woodrooffe's (Mrs.) shades of character,

345; character of the work, 352; er

tract, ib. Woods's (Dr.) letters to the rev. N. W.

Taylor, on the divine permission of sin, 213; nature of the controversy, 212 ; the existence of sin, under the divine gan vernment, 216; character of these letters,

224. Working man's companion, 1; true science

founded on observation, 5; a valuable popular work, 21; capital and labour,

ib.; evils of ignorance, 24. Wye, the, scenery of, 76,

G. Woodfall, Printer, Angel Court, Skiuner Street, Londoni.

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