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E. Government aid to shipping-Continued.

Page.

Italy:

9. Construction and navigation bounty law, 1896......

159

Japan:

10. Construction and navigation bounty law, 1896......

161

11. Shipping bounties in Japan.........

163

Spain:

12. Colonial contract law, 1887....

13. Spanish subsidios, 1895..........

165

Austria-Hungary:

14. Bounty act of 1894 ............

166

Netherlands:

15. Postal subsidies, 1898..........

167

Russia:

16. Steamship subsidies for 1898.........

169

17. Refund of Suez Canal dues.....

170

18. Coasting law, 1899.....

171

Sweden and Norway:

19. Steamship subsidies for 1898.

Denmark:

20. Steamship subsidies for 1895. .......

Portugal:

21. Mail subsidies for 1898....

Roumania:

22. Government ownership of steamship lines.

Chile:

23. Steamship subsidies for 1898.........

174

F. Fisheries ...........:

175

::.

1. Statistics and statement of C'nited States Fish Commiss

175

2. Canadian fishing bounties and statistics .......

176

3. Japanese deep-sea fishing bounty act..........

178

4. French fishing bounties ......................

179

G. Registry of special classes of vessels .......

1. Proclamation of the President concerning Hawaiian registers...

2. Opinion of the Attorney-General concerning the issue of Hawaiian

registers.....

181

3. List of vessels under the Hawaiian flag

4. Registry acts of Congress on the purchase of Louisiana and Alaska. 183

5. List of vessels of Porto Rico........

...........................
6. Partial list of vessels of the Philippines...

....... 185, 405

7. Opinion of the Attorney-General concerning the registry of foreign-

built vessels owned by the Government..

185

8. Foreign-built merchant steamships owned by the War Department.

9. Foreign-built merchant steamships owned by the Navy Department.
H. Tonnage taxes.....

1. Law and collections for the past ten years...
2. Collections for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1899..........
3. Entries of American and foreign vessels at seaports since 1888...
4. Maritime expenditures of the United States for ten years....

5. Trinidad and Tobago tonnage tax proclamations.......

I. Foreign tonnage tax laws and rates...

194

1. British light dues ...

194

2. Local British light dues ...

194

3. New British light dues act....

195

4. French tonnage taxes...

196

5. German tonnage and light dues.........

197

6. Hamburg law and rates ..

197

7. Bremen law and rates ...

198

8. Italian tonnage tax law ..

9. Mexican tonnage tax law...

199

10. Trinidad tonnage tax law ...

203

11. Japanese tonnage tax law.

204

J. Military regulations for vessels.

205

1. Regulations for vessels of Porto Rico and the Philippines.

2. Regulations for vessels of Cuba.....

210

K. Lights for steam pilot vessels

212

British regulation and views of American delegates to the Interna-

tional Marine Conference: Rear-Admiral S. R. Franklin, U. S. N.;

Rear-Admiral W. T. Sampson, U.S. N.; the Hon. William W. Good-

rich, C. A. Griscom, the Hon. s. I. Kimball, and J. W. Shackford..

....

......

....

.

.

....

....

......

Page.

L. Iron construction in the United States.......

217

Historical review of the earliest iron vessels built in the United States,

with list of those built before 1872 ...
M. Reports of British consuls on desertion of British seamen and shipping

methods in the United States: Baltimore, San Francisco, New York,

Boston, Portland, Oreg., Philadelphia ......

N. Boarding of vessels.....

0. Articles in treaties of the United States with foreign nations establishing

reciprocity in shipping and concerning discriminating duties and export

bounties .....

234

Argentine Confederation ...

234

Austria-Hungary ........

Belgium ........

236

Bolivia ..........

237

Brazil ..........

238

China .......

239

New Grenada

239

Korea .......

240

Costa Rica..

240

Denmark ....

Ecuador ....

242

France .......

242

Great Britain ....

243

Greece........

244

Guatemala...

245

Hanover (Germany) ......

246

Hanseatic Republics (German

246

Haiti.

Honduras..............

247

Italy .................

248

Japan ........

249

Liberia ..

249

Mecklenburg-Schwerin (Germa

250

Netherlands ..........

250

Nicaragua .....

Ottoman Porte

Paraguay...

Portugal ...

254

Prussia (Germany).

255

Russia.

256

...................................

Salvador .............

258

Spain............................

258

Sweden and Norway .......

259

Venezuela ..

260

Peru..

261

P. Matters relating to Senate bill 5590...................

262

1. Table of rates to aid in computing payments ....

262

2. Steamships under foreign flags owned by American capital.

265

3. List of the world's fast steamships........

266

4. List of American steamships registered on July 30, 1899...

5. Speed and number of trans-Atlantic mail voyages.........

282

6. Coal consumption of type steamships....................

283

7. Distances between important seaports ......

8. Ocean carrying trade; extracts from address of Sir Robert Giffen..

9. Foreign carrying trade of the United States, by years, from 1821,

with exports and imports........

313

10. Tonuage of American and foreign vessels entered and cleared in

foreign trade from 1821 to 1898..

316

11. Ocean freight and coal exports ...

317

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Page.

5. Registered, enrolled, and licensed iron and steel steam vessels, by customs
districts and States, on June 30, 1899.....

.....

6. Jron and steel sail and steam vessels and barges, by customs districts and

States, on June 30, 1899.......

7. Total registered, enrolled, and licensed sail vessels (wood and iron or steel)

and steam vessels (wood and iron or steel) on June 30, 1899..

343

8. Balance sheet, showing increase and decrease of registered, enrolled, and

licensed vessels for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1899 ........

9. Balance sheet, showing rig of increase and decrease of all vessels for the

fiscal year ended June 30, 1899.........

3.15

10. Registered, enrolled, and licensed sail and steam vessels, by years, from

1789 ............,

10a. Documented canal boats and barges, by years, from 1868.........

350

106. Number and gross tonnage of sail vessels, steam vessels, barges, and canal

boats on the Northern Lakes from 1868 ........

350

11. Sail and steam vessels, canal boats, and barges, by customs districts and

States, on June 30, 1899.......

.............

351

12. Summary of Table 11, by States......

359

13. Classification of sail and steam vessels, by size, by customs districts, and

S ates, on June 30, 1899 .......

360

14. Vessels in cod and mackerel fisheries on June 30, 1899 ....

374

15. Vessels in whale fisheries on June 30, 1899.....

375

16. Employment of vessels on June 30, 1899 ...

375

17. Vessels in foreign, coasting, and fishing trades, by years, from 1789....
18. Annual construction: Sail and steam vessels, canal boats, and barges, by

customs districts and States, built in year ended June 30, 1899.......

19. Summary of Table 18, by States .....

384

20. Rig of sailing vessels, by customs districts and States, built in year ended

June 30, 1899 .....

21. Summary of Table 20...

387

22. River, lake, and ocean steamers, by customs districts and States, built in

year ended June 30, 1899 .......

23. Summary of Table 22........

393

24. Canal boats and barges built in year ended June 30, 1899...

393

25. Iron and steel vessels (sail, steam, barges) built in year ended June 30, 1899.. 393

26. Tonnage built annually in New England, on the seaboard, Western rivers,

and Great Lakes, by years, from 1857..........

394

27. Comparison of construction for 1898 and 1899....

395

28. Sail and steam vessels built, by years, from 1797 ....

396

28a. Sail and steam iron vessels built, by years, from 1834..

399

29. Vessels built, captured, admitted to registry by acts of Congress, lost,

abandoned, and sold to aliens since 1812 ......

400

30. Yachts (documented) on June 30, 1899........

31. Yachts (documented) built in year ended June 30, 1899.........

404

32. Yachts (documented), iron and steel, built in year ended June 30, 1899.... 404

Addendum-additional vessels in the Philippines (see also page 185] ......... 405

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TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

BUREAU OF NAVIGATION,

Washington, D. C., October 18, 1899. SIR: I have the honor to submit to you my annual report, comprising statistics and recommendations, as prescribed by statute.

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1899, American shipping industries shared in the general prosperity of the country, and the new fiscal year has opened with the promise of continued activity in our shipyards. From nearly every point of view the returns tabulated at the end of this volume disclose more satisfactory conditions than it has been possible to deduce from the figures of any year since the establishment of the Bureau.

Our total documented tonnage on June 30, 1899, was the largest since 1865.

Our tonnage enrolled for the coasting trade is the largest in our history and greater than the coasting tonnage of any other nation.

Our tonnage of steam vessels for the first time in our history exceeds that of all other craft.

Our tonnage of steam vessels registered for foreign trade is the largest in our history.

The increase in our registered tonnage is the greatest since 1875.

Our construction during the year was the largest annual output, except 1891, since 1874.

Our construction of steel steam vessels was greater than in 1891 or than any year in our history.

Steel for the second time—the first was in 1897—has been the chief material of construction.

Construction on the Pacific coast has been almost double that of any year in its history except 1898.

Construction on the Mississippi and its tributaries has been the largest since 1883.

The orders for large seagoing steam vessels on which work has begun or will begin during the current fiscal year exceed those of any year in our history.

On shipboard higher standards of living for American seamen have been established than heretofore or than are to be found on the vessels of any other nation.

Wages on American vessels have advanced and are much higher than on the vessels of any other nation, and abuses connected with the allotment of wages have been mitigated.

American seamen enjoy a larger degree of personal liberty than ever and much more than the seamen of any other nation.

There is a reverse to these gratifying statements. During the last fiscal year American vessels carried the smallest percentage of our exports and imports in our history.

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