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he demonstrates, that bodies of that nature are made of particles different in figure, because they may be separated. For, strain seawater through sand, it loses its sharp particles, and becomes sweet, so that it retains only its smooth and round principle*.

Ver. What he here undertakes to prove, is this: The atom* vary in their figure, and in their bigness too, as is proved already. But yet that variety is not infinite, though it be indefinite or incomprehensible. This he proves, first in nineteen verses, from the minuteness of the feeds, which he has before demonstrated: for to make an infinite variety of figures, the mass of some of the seeds must of necessity be immensely great, since an immense magnitude only is capable of an immense variety of figures. If you would change the figure of a body, transpose its parts, and as many different positions as it can receive, so many different figures there will be. Attempt to do the like with an atom, turn and transpose every way the part* that can be conceived in it, and you will find only a finite variety of figures io so sinall a body. Epicurus taught, that the figures of the atoms are incomprehensible, but not infinite, «>«j T* rut a]sfiut axtoiXnvfet,

n i-rnex, fays Plutarch, de Placitis Philosoph. lab. i. c. j. And Epicurus himself writes thus to Herodotus ; 'Ari^uf Tats S/«pe»«7; Six itXuf ittt^n era, Axxæ stem «Tl#/?.!t<r]ii, a /in ftiXXet Ttf at rots /uytHfte irX*( «f «T««» lv]a{ ixCsAAfiv, etrt it ret iWffiw ftiylils arnott; ii»i«v ita^oif aSi/ygfc*.

Ver. 46a. He does not mean' that you should add two, three, or more parts; but suppose it to consist of three or more, that is to fay, of a definite number of parts, each figuration requires a peculiar position of the parts. Now the parts of any finite magnitude may be transposed so many ways, that no new way (hall remain to change the position from what it had been in before, for ! there would be still new and new parts 1 to an infinity; from whence the magnitude \t at length be conceived to he infinite; but rig or this can be in an atom, which is too litrle even to be seen.

Ver. 474. He bring* another reason, in these sixteen verses. If we grant still other and other figures, even to an infinity, no external qualities of natural things would be certain and determined, since they might be so diversified by a new , that at length there might arise a betevery best, and a worse than every Garments of the most precious colours, the sweetest odours, founds, and tastes, might be surpassed by others, and would be no longer in esteem, while the things that seem now most offensive and displeasing, and to which we are most tverie, would be valued above worse than might arise daily.

Ver. 479. For swans, when they are near their death, are laid to sing very sweetly. Thus Martial, ho. ziii. Epig. 77.

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The mournful swan, thus when his death is nigh, In tuneful strains sings his own elegy.

But Pliny denies it," Olerum morte narratur flebilis cantus false, ut arbitrer, aliquot experimentis," lib. x. cap. a«. See the note on Book iii. ver. 5.

Ver. 486. Though our interpreter here mentions the sense of smelling, yet he, at the beginning of his argument, fays, " Has et eontemptua odor myrrhse," the odour of myrrh wonld be contemned, which Lucretius there alleges as an instance of an object of that sense.

Ver. 488. No higher.] That is, from either extreme, either of worst or best. Nor can there be an infinite number of things between either extreme, because every thing is inclosed within certain bounds, and can neither enlarge itself into an infinite magnitude, nor contract itself iuto an infinite littleness; so neither can the goodness of things be improved to an infinite, nor the badness of things be impaired to an infinite.

Ver. 490. In these seven verses, he confirm* his foregoing arguments, because, fays he, thing* are generally determined and bounded by their contrary qualities, which are so extreme that though they may indeed have middle degrees, yet they can have no degree whatever without or beyond themselves, Lambine interprets this of the zones; but I rather think our translator in the right, and that Lucretius meant to speak of the most intense power and force of fire and frost, which are the extremes that bound the middle degrees of heat and cold. For sire is the most hot, and frost or ice the most cold of all thing*.

Ver. 497. Having proved the different figures to be finite, he now adds, in seven verses, another of F.picurus's opinions, which h>, that the seeds of a like figure arc infinite in number; that the globous arc infinite, the oval infinite, the pyramidal infinite, and in like manner of all the other figures. Then he adds a reason far this opinion, from the infiniteness of the atoms which he has proved before. For, since the different forts of the figures arc finite, it is evident, that if the atoms contained under each fort were finite in number, there could be no infinity of atoms in the universe. Epicurus writes to the fame purpose in the epistle to Herodotus: K*f ixirnr II fX.nfia.rtfn it\e/t iveteti \rn a}o/iei, i yit To Wat* eln Tv zrXrJet rut aH/ioit aTetom, et flit etxXtit sit to* x*t txai*i» ri *£r/isnri» iftotat.

Ver. 504. Gasseadus has omitted the four first of these verses, as being improper to the explication of the argument: and indeed we may dispense with the want of them, if we take Lucretius to be disputing still concerning the figures of his atoms; but if we consider the particular argument that follows, they seem even necessary. For he has just proved the infinity of the atoma under each figure: but foreseeing an objection hanging over his head, and that it might be the better understood together with the answer, he, in these four verses, gives notice to the reader what he is to expect: and certainly our transittor was in the right to retain them. But to return to the explication of Lucretius, who, in these thirty-three verses, first objects against what lie has been already arguing, that the atoms under certain figures may seem to be finite, because we see that some animals are more scarce and sewer in number than others: to which he answer*,! that the animals that are scarce in one country abound in another. For instance, that there are many elephants in India, though he scarce ever saw one at Rome. In the next place, that granting there were but one only thing of one certain kind in the world, yet unless the atoms of the lame figure were infinite, that only thing could not be born, nor grow. And, lastly, he brings a comparison to illustrate this assertion; and as it is difficult to find a simile more elegantly expressed, so we can never meet with one more properly applied. For what can better represent the perpetual motion of his atoms, than the disturbed and restless agitation of the sea.

Ver. 511. A region of Asia, where there is great plenty of elephants, as there is likewise in Africa, though none are bred in Europe. Pliny, Nat. Hist. lib. viii. cap 10 and Polybius, lib. v. fays, that in India the houses, and even the stalls of their beasts were enclosed with the trunks of elephants. And who knows not that the chief strength of the Indians consisted in their elephants, by the help of which they defended both themselves and their country.

Ver. Cowley in his Davidei* seems to have imitated this passage of Lucretius:

The sea itself smooths her rough looks awhile,
Flatt'ring the greedy merchant with a smile:
But he whose ship-wreck'd bark she drank before,
Sees the deceit, and knows she would have more.

Ver. (36. Lucretius struggles hard for the infiniteness of his atoms, the figures of which he will have to be very various, and those os each shape to be infinite, which last assertion is the greatest absurdity imaginable. For infinite atoms must fill all the space that is, because is there be any place that can receive another, there may lie conceived an addition to the former number; and therefore to say it was infinite is absurd. And this proves that the infinite atoms of Epicurus can be nothing else but a vast heap of dull moveless matter, coextended, with the infinite space. And how then could the world be made, how these various alterations of bodies, all which proceed from motion, is difficult to be conceived. And this likewise presses the hypothesis of Cartes and his indefinite matter, as a little application will discover.

Ver. 537. These ten verses contain an argument that is a necessary consequent of the former. If we grant the seeds of one fort of figure to be ■ finite, then the things that are composed of those j finite seeds, when they once come to be dissolved j should never be restored. If the seeds were finite, we should in vain expect the growth and generation os things. And what is more certain then that some things arc born, and grow; and that

others decrease and die? from whence it must be concluded thac the seeds of a like figure ar: infinite in number.

Ver. 549. He has hitherto been proving the infinity of atoms, under all the several fora of figures; and now, in four verses, he teaches,dut thing- cannot be composed os seeds of one and the fame pure; and that the various qualities of things proceed from the variety of the feeds, which must necessarily produce a variety likewise of contexture. And this, indeed, he fasS. ciently proves in several places.

Ver. J51. In these six verses, he brings his first argument from the earth, which none will deer, consists of several sorts of feeds, if they consider the springs that bubble, and the flames that burst out of its bowels, together with what varietjof trees and plants it produces, and that it fuppUi nourishment to man and beast. For all tncHe things cannot proceed from feeds nf the faro: magnitude, weight, and figure. Then in City four verses he subjoins many things concerjiug the earth: how the ancient poets feigmt her to be the mother of the gods, and called her Cybcle; he describes the ornaments of the goddess, explains the mysteries of the whole fable, derides the superstition of it, and at length fall) foul upon Providence itself.

Ver. 554. As Hecla, Vesuvius, and otter mountains, which, as well as Ætna, eject sums, a convincing proof that there are subtemr.tin fires, and those too great and many, as appein likewise by the Vulcanian islands, and by the hot baths and fountains that break out of the ari in many places; and which, as Vitruvius, lib 1 rightly observes, could not be," si non in isM haberent aut de snlphure, aut de alumine, aut bitumine ardentes maximos ignes :" in which oe'di he briefly declares the causes of them. To which, as a farther proof, not to mention divers otben, may be added earthquakes, some of which mod certainly derive their original from these subterranean sires. Whoever desires to be farther uti fied touching this matter, may consult PhcVi 1. ii. c. 106. 1 he Epicurean animadversions of Gassendus, and particularly Kircher in his Mund. Subterran. lib. iv. See likewise Ittigius exptetlf upon thi-: subject, in his treatise de Montium h> cend. and the accurate disquisition of AlpiWu Borelhn, in Historia et Meteorologia Intent Æinxi. Anno 1669. Of Ætna, see Book I. »o> 744. and Book VI. ver. 646.

Ver. 557. The earth, which produces all thing1, is said' to be the mother of the gods, of men, tssi of Leasts. Holy tites are instituted to her, whi j Lucretius applies partly to natural, partly to moral philosophy. Those which relate to Jupiter be proposes as a subject worthy of derision; hot m is deservedly owned as a goddess, for the reasons he enumerates in these forty-nine verses, in *W* he tells us why men gave the earth the name ot Magna Parcns, great mother, and why de *rU worihipped it a goddess: and he takes occtM» to explain the ceremonies that were observed in the mysteries of that great mother, «w gives tie reasons of those rites. The fame ceremonies are likewise mentioned by St. Austin, de Civit. Dei, lib. vii. c. 24. and Arnobius, lib. iii adv. Gent says, " Quidam e vobis terram, quod cunctit sufficiat animantibusvictum, magnum matron effe dixerunt." Some among you called the c^rth the great Mother, because it supplies all animals with food and nourishment. So Virgil, Æn. vi. ver. 784.

Qualis Berecynthi:. mater,

Invehitur curru Phrygia* turrita per urbes, l~2ta dcum partu, centum complexa nepotes, Omnes ccelicolas, omnes supera alta tenentet.

In pomp she makes the Phrygian round,

With golden turrents on her temples crown'd:
A hundred gods her sweeping train supply;
Her offspring all, and all command the Iky.

Dryi.

In a palace at Rome, belonging to the family of Colam.a. there is to be seen to tiiis day the following inscription:

DOMUS ÆTERNA FLAVIÆ CHRYSYDIS LABERIA FELICIA SACERDOS MAXIMA MATRIS DEUM, M. L.

Ver. 560. Virgil speaking of this great mother, lays,

Hinc fida Clentia facris,

Et jeracti currum dominæ subiere leones.

Æn. iii. v. III.

She secret rites and ceremonies taught,
And to the yoke the savage lions brought.

DryJtm.

Ver. 561. Macrobins Saturnal, lib. I. cap. 21. "ltec Oca leonibm vehitur, validis impetu at•jie fervorc animalibus; qux natura cceli est, cojus ambito aer continetur, qui vehit terram." This goddess is carried by lions, impetuous and fiery annual,; of which nature is the heaven, within whose circumference is contained the air that Carrie* the earth.

Thas too Claudian:

Et qui perpetno terras ambitque vchitque,
Ncc prejnac incumbens oncri, nec cesicritacr.

And Lncan:

Dum terra fretum, terramque levabic

Aer.

to which Aristophanes, in Nubib. likewise allude*:

And, indeed, if this opinion were to be examined 'mo, according to the decrees of nature, rather than to the doctrines of the poets, it would appear Vidjculoet to philosophers. Yet Pliny, who was admitted into the secrets of nature, as far as any Tjf the Latins, visiMy favours this belief: " Hujus ^■m vi suspensam cum quarto aquarum Elcmento l.brari medio spatio tcllurem,'' says he, lib. i. Nat. Hist. cap. 5. And Achilles Tatius, in Arat, Phas

nomen. illustrates the liberation or suspenCon of the earth in the following manner: " Put," say* he, " one single sheet of millet, or any other small grain whatsoever into a bladder, and by blowing the bladder full of air, the seed or grain will be carried up and remain in the middle of it. After the same manner, the earth being on all side* forced by the air, suspends poised in the midst of it." See Tvrbenus, I. Adversar. 4, c. 17. where he explains these verses of Ovid.

Et circumsuso pendebat in acre Tcllus
Ponderibus librata fuis. Mil am. 1.1,

Ver. 565. Thus too Ovid, 4 Fast.

Cur buic genus acre leonum

Pr.rbeat infolitas ad juga curva comas? Dcsieram: carpit: feritas molita per illam Creditur: id curru testificata fuo est.

Ver. 578. The Romans had several sorts ef crowns or glands, which it was the custom to give as tokens or badges of honour, to such as had distinguished themselves in any action, or done any signal service to the republic. Among the rest there was the " Corona Muralis," the Mural Crown, which was given by the emperor, or general of an army, to him who first scaled the walla of a town that was besieged. It was made of gold, and had spikes that imitated the battlements or pinnacles of walls and towers. Ovid, in the place above cited, gives the fame reason why the ancients crowned the image of the earth with a Mural Crown:

Turrifera caput est onerata figura:

An primis turres urbibus ilia dedit?

Ver. 574. Cybele, the mother of the gods, wa« daughter of Minos king of Crete, and wife of Saturn. The ancients called her by several name*. I. Cybele, either from Cybelus, a hill in Phrygia, where, in her infancy, slie was exposed to wild beasts; or from x*H*Stti, which signifies to throw and set upon the head, because of the frequent turning and fantastic motions of their heads, which her priests were obliged to observe and practise in her rites and ceremonies; and it is probable she had this name from both; for the Greeks called her KvCUn, and KvZnir.. II. « Ops: quod ipsius auxilio vita constet," fays Macrobius, because the life of all things is preserved by the assistance of the earth. III. Rhea, from flu, to flow, because the earth abounds with all good things. IV. Berecynthia, from Berecynthus, a castle of Phrygia, on the banks of the river Sagaris, or a hill of Phrygia, of the fame name, near the river Marsyas. V." Vesta, a vehendo," because the poets feigned her to be carried in a chariot. VI. Peslinuntia, from .Peslinus, a city of Phrygia where slie was honoured. VII." Fauna a sevendo," because the earth is beneficial to all animals. VIII. " Fatua a sando," because, as the fame Macrobius fays, infants never speak till they can let their feet to the earth. XI. Pales, because she was the goddess Pastoruai and Pabulorum, of shepherds and pastutage. X. Dindyn-.e tor was in the right to retain them. But to return to the explication of Lucretius, who, in these thirty-three verses, first objects against what he has been already arguing, that the atoms under certain figures may (ecm to be finite, because we see that some animals arc more scarce and sewer in number than others: to which he answers, that the animals that are scarce in one country abound in another. For instance, that there are many elephants in India, though he scarce ever saw one at Rome, in the next place, that granting there were but one only thing us one certain kind in the world, yet unless the atoms of the lame figure were infinite, that only thing could not be born, nor grow. And, lastly, he brings a comparison to illustrate this assertion , and as it is difficult to find a simile more elegantly expressed, so we can never meet with one more properly applied. For what can better represent the perpetual motion of his atoms, than the disturbed and restless agitation of the sea.

Ver. 5x1. A region of Asia, where there is great plenty of elephants, as there is likewise in Africa, though none are bred in Europe. Pliny, Nat Hist. lib. viii. cap 10 and Polybius, lib. v. fays, that in India the houses, and even the stalls of their beasts were enclosed with the trunks of elephants. And who knows not that the chief strength of the Indians consisted in their elephants, by the help of which they defended both themselves and their country.

Ver. 545. Cowley in his Davideis seems to have imitated this passage of Lucretius:

The sea itself smooths her rough looks awhile,
Flatt'ring the greedy merchant with a smile:
But he whose ship-wreck'd bark she drank before,
Sees the deceit, and knows (he would have more.

Ver. (36. Lucretius struggles hard for the infiniter.ess us his atoms, the figures of which he will have to be very various, and those of each shape to be infinite, which last assertion is the greatest absurdity imaginable. For infinite atoms must fill all the space that is, because if there be any place that can receive another, there may be conceived an addition to the former number; and therefore to say it was infinite is absurd. And this proves that the infinite atoms of Epicurus can be nothing else but a vast heap of dull moveless matter, coextended, with the infinite space. And how then could the world be made, how these various alterations of bodies, all which proceed from motion, is difficult to be conceived. ADd this likewise presses the hypothesis of Cartes and hit indefinite matter, as a little application will discover.

Ver. J3 7. These ten verses contain an argument that it a necessary consequent of the former. If we grant the seeds of one fort of figure to be finite, then the things that are composed of those finite seeds, wheu they once come to be dissolved should never be restored. If the seeds were finite, we should in vain expect the growth and generation of things. And what is more certain then that some things arc born, and grow; and that

others decrease and die? from whence it mu! be concluded that the seeds of a like figure an infinite in number.

Ver. 549 He has hitherto been proving the 'infinity of atoms, under all the several foru of figures; aad now, in four verses, he teaches,that things cannot be composed of seeds of one a; J the fame tigure; and that the various qualities 0' things proceed from the variety of the feeds, which mutt necessarily produce a variety likewise of contexture. And this, indeed, he sufficiently proves in several places.

Ver. 551. In these six verses, he brings hisfiru argument from the earth, which none will dear, consists of several sorts of seeds, if they confide! the springs that bubble, and the flames that butt out of its bowels, together with what variety of trees and plants it produces, and that it fupplti nourishment to man and beast. For all thole things cannot proceed from seeds of the fane magnitude, weight, and figure. Then in sixty four verses he subjoins many things concer.ing the earth: how the ancient pneu feigned her to be the mother of the gods, and called her Cyhele; he describes the ornaments of the goddess, explains the mysteries of the whole fable, derides the superstition of it, and at length falii foul upon Providence itself.

Ver. 554. As Hecla, Vesuvius, and other mountains, which, as well as Ætna, eject sumo, a convincing proof that there are subtemceaa fires, and those too great and many, as appears likewise by the Vulcanian islands, and by the ho', baths and fountains that break out of the earth in many places; and which, as Vitruvius, lib 1 rightly observes, could not be, " si non in i"> haberent aut de sulphure, aut de alunaine, tut hitumine ardentes maximos igues :" in which words he briefly declares the causes of them. To which, as a farther proof, not to mention divers otht:!, may be added earthquakes, some of which Bm certainly derive their original from these siihter. ranean sires. Whoever desires to be farther uti ficd touching this matter, may consult Ms* I. ii. c. 106. The Epicurean animadversions of Gassendus, and particularly Kirchcr in his Mood. Subterran. lib. iv. See likewise Ittigiui expressly upon thii iubjrct, in his treatise do Montiom Itcend. and the accurate disquisition of AlphooJU Boie'.hu, in Historia et Meteorologia iDcecdi. Ætnxi. Anno 1669. Of Ætna, see Book I. rer. 744. and Book VI. ver. 646.

Ver. 557. The earth, which produces all thœpi is said to be the mother of the gods, of men, sM of beasts. Holy rites are instituted to her, which Lucretius applies partly to natural, partly to moral philosophy. Those which relate to Jupiter be proposes as a subject worthy of derision, but flu is deservedly owned as a goddess, for the reafiwj he enumerates in these forty-nine verses, in which he tells us why men gave the earth the name of Magna Parcns, great mother, and why (he ■« worshipped as a goddess: and he takes occasion to explain the ceremonies that were ohscrvw in the mysteries of that great mother, snd

• itts the reasons of those rites. The same cere-
monies arc likewise mentioned by Sc. Austin, de
Grit. Dei, lib. vii. c. 14. and Arnobius, lib. iii
adv. Gent fays, " Quidam e vobis terrain, quod
cunctii suEciat animantibus victim), magnum ma-
tTM tffe dixtrunt." Some among you called the
earth the great Mother, because it supplies all
auimals with food and nourishment.
So Virgil, Æn. vi. ver. 784.

—Qnalis Bererynthi- mater,
lnichitur curru Phrygian turrita per nrbes,
Lxtadeum partu, centum complexa nepotes,
Omnes ccelicolat, omnes supera alta tenentes.

—In pomp she makes the Phrygian round,
With golden lurrents on her temples crown'd:
A hundred gods her sweeping train supply;
H:r offspring all, aad all cummaud the iky.

DryJ.

In t palace at Rome, belonging to the family of Celonu, there is to be seen to t.iii day the following inscription:

D0MU3 ÆTERN A FLAVIÆ CHRYSYDIS UBEWA FELIC1 A SACERD03 MAXIMA MAsRlS DEUM, M. L.

Ver. 560. Virgil speaking of this great mother, seys,

Hinc fida silcntia facris,

Ji.cti curium dominæ subicre leones.

Æn. iii. v. US.

she secret rites and ceremonies tanght,
tad to the yoke the savage lions brought.

Drydtn.

Ver. 561. Macrobius Saturnal, lib. I. cap. al. 'Hjc Oca leonibus vehitur, validis impetu at[xfcrroreanimalibus; quæ natura cceli est,cujus mlini aer continetur, qui vehit terram." This rudest is carried by lions, impetuous and fiery mioiu; of which nature is the heaven, within 'knit circumference is contained the air that car's the earth.

'hœ too Claudian:

1 qoi perpetuo terras ambitque vehitque,
let f remat incumbent oncri, nec ecsscrit aer.

"d Lucan:

—Dnm terra fretum, terramque levabit

0 which Aristophanes, in Nubib. likewise aides:

1 ItmJ Cfbj ipir»zi J; *x*is Triiym ftminian. 'nd, indeed, if this opinion were to be examined

according to the decrees of nature, rather hir. to the doctrines of the poets, it would s<ppear UKak*i to philosophers. Yet Pliny, who was dmiticd into the secrets of nature, as far as any if the Latins, visi'dy savours this belief: " Hujus H '1 fufper.lam cum quarto aquarum Elcmento iirinmcdio spatio tellurem,'' says he, lib. i. Nat. i'st-cip. 5. And Achilles Tatius, in Arat, Phsc

nomen. illustrates the liberation or suspension of the earth in the following manner: '.' Put," say* he, " one single sheet of millet,or any other small grain whatsoever into a bladder, and by blowing the bladder full of air, the seed or grain will be carried up and remain in the middle of it. Aster the same manner, the earth being on all fides forced by the air, suspends poised in the midst of it." See Tarbenus, I. Adversar. 4, c. 17. where he explains these verses of Ovid.

Et circumfuso pendebat in acre Tcllus
Ponderibus librata suis.—— Mitam.l. 1.

Ver. 365. Thus too Ovid, 4 Fast.

Gur huic genus acre leonum

Praibeat infolitas ad juga curva comas? Desieram: carpit 1 feritas molita per illatn Creditur: id curru testificata suo est.

Ver. 578. The Romans had several sorts cf crowns or garlands, which it was the custom to give as tokens or badges of honour, to such as had distinguiflied themselves in aDy action, or done any signal service to the republic. Among the rest there was the " Corona Muralis," the Mural Crown, which was given by the emperor, or general of an army, to him who first scaled the walla os a town that was besieged. It was made of gold, and had spikes that imitated the battlements or pinnacles of walls and towers. Ovid, in the place above cited, gives the fame reason why the ancients crowned the image of the earth with a Mural Crown 1

Turrisera caput est onerata figura;

An primis turres urbibus ilia dedit?

Ver. 574. Cybele, the mother of the gods, wai daughter of Minos king of Crete, and wile of Saturn. The ancients called her by several names. I. Cybele, either from Cybelus, a hill in Phrygia, where, in her infancy, she was exposed to wild beasts; or from xriir.Sni, which signifies to throw and set upon the head, because of the frequent turning and fantastic motions of their heads, which her priests were obliged to observe and practise in her rites and ceremonies; and it is probable she had this name from both; for the Greeks called her KuC1A.11, and Kt;V;V. II. " Ops: quod ipsius auxilio vita consiet," fays Macrobius, because the life of all things is preserved by the assistance of the earth. III. Rhea, from f'm, to slow, because the earth abounds with all good things. IV. Berecynthia, from Berccynthus, a castle of Phrygia, on the banks of the river Sagaris, or a hill of Phrygia, of the fame name, near the river Marfyas. V." Vesta, a vehendo," because the poets feigned her to be carried in a chariot. VI. Peflinuntia, from Pefiinus, a city of Phrygia where she was honoured. VII." Fauna a fevendo," because the earth is beneficial to all animals. VIII. " Fatua a fando," because, as the fame Macrobius fays, infants never speak till they can sec their feet to the earth. XI. Pales, because she was the goddess Paftorum and Pabulorum, of shepherds and pasturage. X. Dindyme

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