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LORDS.
After this the House divided, when

Cowley
Tenterden

Hay (Kinnonly : there were lonely s vtis o sol blanw

Ribblesdale

Meldrum (Aboyne)

Dynevor
Against the bill, present, 150 Rodney

Rolle

Wyufords 10
Proxies, 49*** 50
W 2012

Grantham
DOBU TU

Fevershambad Delamere
bas buod miatt

Carbery

Arden

Wharcliffe Did van bod 199 Arundell

Maryborough

Dufterin
For the bill, present, 1. 128

Clanbrassill (Roden)
Bexley

Douglas
is a Proxies,

30
Redesdale

Montague
and to

Melros (Haddington)

Penshurst (Strang30 Jubah bus

ford)
- Walsingham

Gambier
158
Monson

Prudhoe
Carteret

De Roos
Saltoun

Northwick
Majority against the bill, 41 Boston

Bayning

Southampton

Bolton
The following is a list of the Majority Kere

BISAOPS.

Gage (Visc. Gage) and of the Minority; whence it will be Clanwilliam (Earl of

Archbishop of Can

terbury

Llandaff seen that there were twenty-one of the Clanwilliam

Stuart de Rothsay Winchester
Bishops who voted against the bill and Ellenborough

Lincoln
Ravens worth

Rochester
two of them who voted for the bill.

* Forbes

Gloucester
16 34 1 1 1 1 1 551 Lyndhurst

Bristol
Forester

Bath and Wells . LIST OF THE MAJORITY AND MINORITY Farnborough

Exeter
IN THE DIVISION ON THE REFORM Willoughby de Broke

Lichfield and Cov.

Sheffield (Earl of
BILL IN THE HOUSE OF LORDS ON

Salisbury
Sheffield)

Oxford
SATURDAY MORNING, 8TH OCTOBER,

Skelinersdale
1831.

Wallace

TELLER
MAJORITY.

Manners
H. R. H. The Duke Tankerville

Colville

Lord Kenyon! of Cubberland

Vane (Londonderry)
H. B. H. the Duke Bathurst

PROXIES.
sf Glouceste ad
Wicklow

Colchester
Jersey

St. Helens
2013 Westmorland

Marlborough

Calthorpe
DEKES
Beverley IT

Northumberland

Carrington
Backingham
Plymouth P 1

Ross (Glasgow)
Wellington

MARQUISES.
Falmonth

Bagot
Beaufort
Delawar

Tweedale

De Dunstanville
Leeds
Aylesford H

Gray
Rutlanda Powisu

Stowell
Dorset to Brownlow

Malmsbury

Wigan (Balcarras)
Newcastle

Macclesfield
D. Harrow by
Manchester

Churchill
Bradford
Stamford

Grantley
Mount Edgcumbe

Harris
MARQUISES, la Limerick

Leven and Melville Glenlyon
Liverpool

Elgin
Bristol

Scarsdale
Caledon

Chesterfield

Hopetoun (Earl of
Thomondo
Howe
Charleville

Hopetoun)
Camden
Norwich (Gordon)
Lucan

Lauderdale (Earl of
Bute
20. Verulam

Carrick

Lauderdale)
Salisbury
Wilton

Graham (Montrose) Faraham
Coolmondeley
w Warwick

Scarborough
Bath

Loftus (Ely)
Eseter
Waldegrave

Cardigan

Archbishop of Tuam
Home
Aylesbary

VISCOUNTS.
Enniskillen
Hertford
Carnarvon

Clancarty (Earl of
Abingdon

Clancarty)

Bangor
ZARLS.
St. Germans

Gort

St. Asaph
Hardwicke
Strathallen

Cork
Snaftesbury

Exmouth
Powletti
Harewood

Peterborough

Durham
Coventry
Dartmouth

LORDS.

Carlisle
Glengal
Dodcaster (Buc-
Mountcashell

Rivers
deugb)

Leighlin and Ferns
Saltersford

Cloyne
Mansfeld

VISCOUNTS.
Winchelsea

MINORITY.
Orford
Sidmouth
H.R.H. the Duke of

MARQUISES.
Rossiyn
Beresford

Sussex
Beauchamp

Cleveland
Gordon (Aberdeen)
Cailford
Combermere

Hastings

DUKES,
Dudley
Arbuthnot

Westminster
Melville

Grafton
Digby

Westmeath
Lorton

St. Alban's

Queensberry
Doneraile

Richmond
Lonsdale

Winchester
Sydney

Brandon
Eldon

Anglesey
Maynard

Norfolk
Sellark

Lansdown
Hats
Hereford

Devonshire

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Onslow
Chichester
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Before I proceed further with a hig-
Plunkett

tory of this memorable" week, let me Clements (Leitrim)

offer to my readers some remarks opon Rossie (Kinnaird)

the debute. It was, throughout, distinFife (E. or Pife)

guistied by infinitely greater talent than Ponsouby of Imo

Lord Auckland had been displayed upon the same sub-
PROXIES.

ject in the other House. Every thing
Fortescue

that could be said against the bill was
Spencer
Derby

said against it by the opposing Lords.

But the opposition to it had assumed an
Burlington
Slirewsbury

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MARQUISES.
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Commons; for then it had been repro Northampton

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form at all; and the petitions for her to had a more improved or more satisfacform were ascribed to a sort of tempo- tony representation than this country sh » rary excitation, produced by the French enjoys at this moment. I do not mean Revolution of July, 1830. Now, how to enter upon that subject now, as it ever, there was no Peer who spoke a-1 it is probable we shall have abundant : gainst the bill, who did not readily con- " opportunities to consider it after fess that a reform to some extent and “wards ; but I do say that this count even a considerable extopt das become try has now a Legislature more calcunecessary. The people had produced lated to answer all the purposes of a this change by their excellent conduet “good Legislatura than any other that at the last election, when, in answer to can well be devised that it possesses, the appeal, made to them by the King, and deservedly possesses, the confithey, by exertions such as never were" dence of the country, and that its made by any people upon the face of discussions have a powerful influence the earth, sent him back a majority of in the country. And I will say furmore than a hundred for the bill instead ther, that if I had to form a Legislaof a majority of oneri Besides this, the ture, I would create one-not equal people, led by the spirited inhabitants“ in excellence to the present, for that I of Narbonne, had dow showed their could not efpect to be able to do, but determination to bave reform or to re-1" something, as nearly of the same des sist the payment of tates; and, an 'inci- scription as possible. I should form dent arising in that parish, from the "it of men possessed of a very large usurpations of a Select Vestry, had af- " proportion of the property of the forded, seteral days before the debate" country, in which the landholders began, a practical illustration of the “ should have a great preponderance.. working of the effect of such resistance, “ I, therefore, am not prepared with with regard to which it is justice to any nieasure of Parliamentary Reform, -, mention the names of Mesrrs. Potter" nor shall any measure of the kind be and Sarage, iwo tradesmen of shat pa-“ proposed BY THE GOVERNMENT rish, who set the example of that resist- " AS LONG AS I HOLD MY PREance. The conduct of the people upon “ SENT POSITION.” this occasion had been so resolute, and This speech was made on the 2nd of at the same time so cool and so peace- November, during a debate on the able, that the Lords in opposition to the King's speech at the opening of the bill, dropped their opposition to all Parliament. Who, after this, would : reform, and only contended that this have expected to hear this same Duke, was not the sort of reform that ought to in a debate on the 4th of October, 1831, be adopted.

speaking in favour of some change in Even the Duke of Wellington, who, the representation; some change in in Nosember of last year had declared that, the excellence of which no human : that no reform at all was wanted; that, skill could invent any-thing to equal ! : if he had to make a representative Go- Yet, such was now the nature of his vernment

but it will be best declarations. His words, uttered on the to take the whole of the speech that I 4th of October, were, according to the refer 10, which was as follows: But report, as follows:-“I have referred " the noble Earl had recommended the “ (says his Grace) to that which was "expedient of Parliamentary Reform, “ the state of the country, at the mo" and remarked that he did not think “ ment when the King 'declared from * that the Government was as yet, pre

the throne his intention to dissolve * pared with any plan on the subject," the Parliament. I must say, that :

The noble Earl was right, for certain. " since that time the question has maa * ly the Government was not prepared terially changed its aspect, and that “ with any plan for Parliamentary Re- change has been effected chiefly by " form, I will go further, and say that " the course which his Majesty's Minis. "I never heard that any country ever" ters thought proper to adopt. It is :

quite obvious also to me, that whatever mination against going into the Commay come of this measure, not much mittee, though every one saw that that " time will elapse before the subject will was the natural way of giving that some “ be brought again under your consi- reform, of the necessity of giving " deration; and 'though I earnestly which they talked so much. The truth * recommend to your Lordships to vote is this : they intended to destroy this “ against the second reading of this bill; to prevail upon the King to give bill

, yet I'would introat that your de- up his Minister; to bring in another, “ cision be so given as not to pledge you (bill, if they found the popular storm too

to any other question or proposition strong for them ; and if they found the “ connected with Refornt which may storn blowing over, to bring in no bill hereafter be proposed by any noble at all; and, as one of them proposed, “ Lord, whether in public or in private; to postpone the discussion for two years. “ your Lordships will, by thus refrain- This would have got rid of the Minister, “ing from pledging yourselves, 'Be who had distinctly declared that the

enabled, when the question is regu- passing of the bill should be the sole “ larly brought before you, to form a condition upon which he would retain

correct judginent, and to render great his office." “ service to the country. (Cheers.)" Such was the character of the debate

Thus it is evident that the plan of on the part of the opposition, to which the opposition was immediately to bring may be added, thrat, while their mouths in a bill of their own for a Parliamen were full of professions in favour of tary Reform ; to turn out Lord Grey, some reform, they made use of scarcely and to put the Duke at the head of a an argument that was not levelled new Ministry; or, at least, to make a against all reform whatsoever; for every new Ministry of which he should be a part. man of them contended for the utility

The Ministers therefore pinned him down of the rotten boroughs. This did not to his declaration of November, 1830 ; escape the observation of the quickwhen, after he was out of office, he had sighted public, who, therefore, saw that said that he ha resigned purposely be- there was no hope of a peaceable tercause he would not entertain a proposi- mination of the contest unless the peo. tion for reform. He tried to escape ple resolutely set their faces against from this charge, but it was so firmly every attempt to displace Lord Grey ; stuck upon him by Lord Plunkett, that against every attempt to induce them his attempt to escape was in vain. These to place trust in any-body else. attempts were made on the Tuesday On the part of the Ministers, the deand Wednesday ; so that, before the hate was conducted in a very laudable termination of the debate, the people and able manner, till we came, at nearly clearly saw the views of the opposition; the close of it, to the speech of the Lord and though this opposition promised Chancellor, of the very equivocal chathem a reform, and perhaps, as in the racter of which I shall speak by-and-by. case of Catholic Emancipation, would Lord Holland did not speak at any have brought in a bill as good or better length; but what he did say on two or than the present bill, the people, to their three occasions during the debate was eternal honour, said, “No: we will not most excellent. The speeches of Lords “ trust you : we will have the bill of Melbourne and Goderich were frank “ Lord Grey, who we know will not and sensible. They had both been all “play us false." So that these profes- their lives bitter enemies of parliamentsions in favour of reform had not the ary reform in any and in every degree. smallest tendency to quiet the minds of Both of them confessed this very disthe people, or to slacken their exertions tinctly; and while this did them great in favour of the bill, and in support of credit; while they attempted none of its author. Besides this, while they all that shuffling to make out consistency, professed their readiness to give some which is resorted to in so many cases reform, they all expressed their deter- and by which men become wholly use

dat gaura B less to the cause to which they have serving amongst the unthinking millions been converted, while, by their frank- the appearance of opposition to them. ness, they entiiled themselves to the Now, this is what was never seen in apology of St. Paul, for change of opi- Lord Grey, who never upon any occarion, they might, if they had so pleased,sion uttered a word to keep in countegone a little further with the same great nance those of whom he saw, the main apostle, and confessed themselves, to object was to crush reformers and rehave been persecutors of reform, as he form. The people know all this, and had been of the church of Christ ;, for therefore it is no wonder that they cling they both 'voted for the dungeoning and to Lord GREY. aud gagging bills brought in by Sid However, these two lords acted, upon mouth and Castlereagh in 1817, they this occasion, a manly and straight-forboth voted for those cruel bills, and ward part. The speech of the Lord Lord Melbourne stood forward, nay, Chancellor was very long. I never quitted his party to stand forward, as the read a good one of his making, and this defender of those bills, founded on re- 'was the worst that I ever read as comports, in refutation of the statements of sing from bis lips. There was a great which they would hear no evidence, deal of very low and even second-hand though tendered at their bar. “ I," wit, containing no severity against the says St. Paul, "am the least of all the opponents of the bill. The story about apostles, for I persecuted the church the cooks and the tavern bill must have

of Christ ;" I do not wish these two disgusted a man in the state of anxiety Lords to be thought ill of on account of in which Lord Grey must have been. their conduct upon that occasion; but The high-flown compliments bestowed When these things are remembered, an on HARROWBY, and the calling of that acknowledgment of mere error is not old and inveterate enemy of reform

quite enough. However, as St. Paul his " noble friend," was very ominous; founded his hope of forgiveness solely but, there was something a great deal on the redeeming merits of his MASTER, more suspicious than this, and a great so these noble Lords must rely, I fancy, deal more offensive to me; nainely, an upon the merits of Lord Grey, who bas expressed readiness to make the ten been the founder of reform, never the pound suffrage a subject of discussion, persecutor of reformers, but always their with a broad hint of a readiness, on his defender, upon every occasion that they part, to give up that most important have been assailed in the course of his part of the bill." I will not be charged life since he became a man. Never shall with misrepresentation here. I allude I forget his speech against the conduct to two passages, in particular, of the of the Manchester magistrates in 1819; speech, and I will take those two parts but it has been the same with him upon without any garbling, and then ask, the every occasion when the people have reader what he thinks they can possib'y been cruelly treated. In Brougham, in inean, other than that the Lord ChanMacintosh, in Plunkett; in almost every cellor was ready, if necessary, to some Whig, except Lord Holland, we have purpose or other that he might have in seen an affected condemnation of the view, to give up this part of the bill, or harsh measures towards the reformers; so to modify it as to make it no, longer bat always accompanied (pray mark a thing which the people would receive. it) with ridicule, sarcasm, if not bitter The first passage, taken from the Marncalumny, on the conduct of the re- ing Chronicle, was as follows: formers. We have seen a speaking and “ I have listened with profound at a roting against the harsh measures ; “tention to the debate, of whiske, I but a speaking in such a sort as to cause “ believe, will be the last bigly the main part of the nation to believe" which has already occupied Predlys, that the harsh measures were necessary;" and having heard a vast varteloof ob and a voting in such a sort as to insure "jections, having weighed the neuters the carrying of the measures, and pre-1" on both sides, and carelerin haber

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