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But Amarillis, whether fortunate
Or else unfortunate may I aread,

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That freed is from Cupid's yoke by Fate,
Since which he doth new bands' adventure dread,
Shepherd, whatever thou hast heard to be
In this or that prais'd diversly apart,
In her thou mayst them all assembled see, 570
And seal'd up in the treasure of her heart.
Ne thee less worthy, gentle Flavia !
For thy chaste life and vertue I esteem.
Ne thee less worthy, courteous Candida!
For thy true love and loyalty I deem.

575 Besides yet many mo that Cynthia serve, Right noble nymphs, and high to be commėn

ded;

But if I all should praise as they deserve,
This fun would fail me ere I half had ended ;
Therefore in closure of a thankful mind,

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I deem it best to hold eternally
Their bounteous deeds and noble favours shrin'd,
Than by discourse them to indignify.”

So having said, Aglaura him bespake; “ Colin, well worthy were those goodly favours 585 Bestow'd on thee, that so of them doost make, And them requitest with thy thankful labours ; But of great Cynthia's goodness and high grace Finish the story which thou hast begun.

“ More eath, quoth he, it is in such a case 590 How to begin, than know how to have done;

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For every gift, and every goodly meed
Which she on me bestow'd demands a day, .
And every day in which she did a deed
Demands a year it duly to display.

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Her words were like a stream of hony fleeting,
The which doth softly trickle from the hive,
Able to melt the hearer's heart unweeting,
And eke to make the dead again alive.
Her deeds were like great clusters of ripe grapes 600
Which load the bunches of the fruitful vine,
Offering to fall into each mouth that gapes,
And fill the same with store of timely wine.
Her looks were like beams of the morning sun,
Forth-looking through the window of the East, 605
When first the fleecie cattle have begun
Upon the perled grass to make their feast.
Her thoughts are like the fume of frankincense,
Which from a golden censer forth doth rise,
And throwing forth sweet odours, mounts fro
thence

610 In rolling globes up to the vaulted skies : There she beholds, with high aspiring thought, The cradle of her own creation, Emongst the seats of angels heavenly wrought, Much like an angel in all form and fashion.” 615

“ Colin,” said Cuddy, “then thou hast forgot Thy self, me seems, too much, to mount so hie; Such lofty flight base shepherd seemeth not, From flocks and fields to angels and to sky."

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True,"answer'd he ; “ but her great excellence Lifts me above the measure of my might, 621 That being fill'd with furious insolence, I feel my self like one yrapt in spright: For when I think of her, as oft I ought, Then want I words to speak it fitly forth ; And when I speak of her what I have thought, I cannot think according to her worth : Yet will I think of her, yet will I speak, So long as life my limbs doth hold together, And when as death these vital bands shall break,630 Her name recorded I will leave for ever : Her name in every tree I will endoss, That as the trees do grow her name may grow, And in the ground each where will it engross, And fill with stones, that all men may it know.635 The speaking woods and murmuring waters-fall Her name I'le teach in knowen terms to frame; And eke my lambs, when for their dams, they

call, I'le teach to call for Cynthia by name: And long while after I am dead and rotten, 640 Amongst the shepherds daughters dauncing round, My lays made of her shall not be forgotten, But sung by them with flowry girlondś crown'd. And ye, whoso ye be, that shall survive, When as ye hear her memory renew'd, Be witness of her bounty here alive, Which she to Colin her poor shepherd shew'd."

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Much was the whole assembly of those heards Mov'd at his speech, so feelingly he spake, And stood awhile astonish'd at his words, 650 Till Thestýlis at last their silence brake, Saying, “ Why, Colin, since thou found'st such

grace With Cynthia, and all her noble crew, Why didst thou ever leave that happy place, In which such wealth might unto thee accrew, 655 And back returnedst to this barren soil, Where Cold, and Care, and Penury, do dwell, Here to keep sheep with hunger and with toil ? Most wretched he that is and cannot tell.”

“ Happy indeed,” said Colin, “ I him hold, 660 That may that blessed presence still enjoy, Of Fortune and of Envy uncontrould, Which still are wont most happy states t'annoy ; But I, by that which little while I prov'd, Some part of those enormities did see, The which in Court continually hoov’d, And follow'd those which happy seem'd to be; Therefore I, silly Man! whose former days Had in rude fields been altogether spent, Durst not adventure such unknowen ways, 670 Nor trust the guile of Fortune's blandishment, But rather chose back to my sheep to tourn, Whọse utmost hardness I before had try'd, Than having learn'd repentance late, to mourn Emongst those wretches which I there descry'd." 673

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“ Shepherd," said Thestylis, “ it seems of spight Thou speakest thus 'gainst their felicity, Which thou enviest, rather than of right That ought in them blame-worthy thou doost

spy." “ Cause have I none;" quoth he, “of cancred will To quit them ill that ine demean’d so well, 681 But self-regard of private good or ill Moves me of each, so as I found, to tell, And eke to warn young shepherds wandring wit, Which through report of that life's painted bliss 685 Abandon quiet home to seeke for it, And leave their lambs to loss, misled amiss ; For sooth to say, it is no sort of life For shepherd fit to lead in that same place, Where each one seekes with malice and with strife 690 To thrust down other into foul disgrace, Himself to raise; and he doth soonest rise That best can handle his deceitful wit In subtil shifts, and finest sleights devise, Either by slandring his well-deemed name, Through leasings leud and feigned forgery, Or else by breeding him some blot of blame, By creeping close into his secrecy ; To which him needes a guilefull hollow heart, Masked with fair dissembling curtesy, 700 A filed tongue, furnish'd with terms of art, No art of school, but courtiers' schoolery :

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