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and good faith of the English, they applied to Mr. Swartz; “Sir, if you send a person to us, send a person who has learned all your Ten Commandments.”

7. Some of the English think that we ought not to disturb the faith of the Hindoos! After the apostolic Swartz had labored for fifty years in evangelizing the Hindoos, so sensible were they of the blessing, that his death was considered as a public calamity. An innumerable multitude attended the funeral. The Hindoo Rajah "shed a flood of tears over the body, and covered it with a gold cloth.” His memory is still blessed among the people. The king of Tanjore has lately written to the bishops of the Eng. lish, church requesting that a monument of marble may be sent to him “in order,” he adds, “that it may be erected in the church which is in my capital, to perpetuate the memory of the rev. Mr. Swartz, and manifest the esteem I have for the character of that great and good man, and the gratitude I owe to him, my father and my friend."

8. But whence was this Swartz? and under what sanction did he and his predecessors exersise their. ministry as Christian preachers to the heathen?

The first person appointed to superintend a protestant mission in India was Bartholomew Ziegenbalgius a man of considerable learning and of emient piety, educated at the university of Haile in Germany. Having been ordained by the learned Burmanus, bishop of Zealand, in his twenty-third year, he sailed for India in one thousand seven hundred and five. A complete century will have revolved in October of this year, since the mission in India began. Immediately on his arrival, he applied himself to the study of the language of the country, and with such success, that in a few years he obtained a classical knowledge of it; and the colloquial tongue became as familliar to him as his own. His fluent orations addressed to the native, and his, frequent cor

ferences with the Brahmins,* were attended with almost immediate success; and a Christian church was founded in the second year of his ministry, which has been extending its limits to the present time.

9. During his residence in India, he maintained a correspondence with the king of England and other prices, and with many of the learned men on the continent. In the year seventeen hundred and fourteen, he returned to Europe for a few months on the affairs of the mission. On this occasion he was honored with an audience by his Majesty George the First. He was also invited to attend a sitting of the Bishops in the "Society for promoting Christian knowledge;" where he was received with an eloquent address in the Latin language; to which he answered in the Tamul tongue; and then delivered a copy of his speech translated into Latin. i

10. The grand work to which the King and English bishops had been long directing his attention, was a translation of the scriptures into the Tamul or Malabarian language.

This indeed was the grand work; for wherever the scriptures are translated into the vernacular tongue, and are open and common to all, inviting enquiry and causing discussion, they cannot remain a dead letter; they produce fruit of themselves, even without a teacher. When a heathen views the word of God in all its parts, and hears it addressing him in his own familiar tongue, his conscience responds, "this is the word of God.”. The learned man who produces a translation of the Bible into a new language, is a greater benefactor to mankind than the prince who founds an empire. The "incorruptable seed of the word of God” can never die. After ages have revolved, it is still producing new ac. cessions to truth and huinan happiness.

So diligent in his studies was this eminent missionary, that before the year seventeen hundred and

+ A votume ef these conferences was published in London in 1719, 8vo.

nineteen, he had completed a translation of the whole scriptures in the Tamul tongue; and had also composed a grammar and dictionary of the same language, which remain with us to this day.

11. The peculiar interest taken by King George the first in this primary endeavour to evangelize the Hindoos, will appear from the following letters ad. dressed to the missionaries by his Majesty.

"George, by the grace of God, King of Great Britain,

France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &C. To the reverend and learned Bartholomew Ziegenbalgius and Fohn Ernest Grundlerus, missionaries at Tranquebar in the East Indies,

“REVEREND AND BELOVED, "Your letters dated the twentieth of January, of the present year, were most welcome to us; not only because the work undertaken by you of converting the heathen to the Christian faith, doth by the grace of God prosper, but also because that in this our kingdom such a laudable zeal for the promotion of the gospel prevails.. .

"We pray you may be endued with health and strength of body, that you may long continue to fulfil your ministry with good success; of which, as we shall be rejoiced to hear, so you will always find us ready to succour you in whatever may tend to promote your work and to excite your zeal. We as- : sure you of the continuance of our royal favour.” Given at our palace of Hampton Court, the twenty

third of August, A. D. seventeen hundred and
seventeen, in the fourth year of our reign.

“GEORGE R.

Hattorf.”

12. The king continued to cherish with much so- . licitude the interests of the mission after the death af Ziegenbalgius; and in ten years from the date of

ferences with the Brahmins, * were attended with almost immediate success; and a Christian church was founded in the second year of his ministry, which has been extending its limits to the present time.

9. During his residence in India, he maintained a correspondence with the king of England and other prices, and with many of the learned men on the continent. In the year seventeen hundred and fourteen, he returned to Europe for a few months on the affairs of the mission. On this occasion he was honored with an audience by his Majesty George the First. He was also invited to attend a sitting of the Bishops in the "Society for promoting Christian knowledge;" where he was received with an eloquent address in the Latin language; to which he answered in the Tamul tongue; and then deliver. ed a copy of his speech translated into Latin. .

10. The grand work to which the King and English bishops had been long directing his attention, was a translation of the scriptures into the Tamul or Malabarian language.

This indeed was the grand work; for wherever the scriptures are translated into the vernacular tongue, and are open and common to all, inviting enquiry and causing discussion, they cannot remain a dead letter; they produce fruit of themselves, even without a teacher. When a heathen views the word of God in all its parts, and hears it addressing him in his own familiar tongue, his conscience responds, “this is the word of God.” The learned man who produces a translation of the Bible into a new language, is a greater benefactor to mankind than the prince who founds an empire. The "incorruptable seed of the word of God” can never die. After ages have revolved, it is still producing new ac. cessions to truth and huinan happiness.

So diligent in his studies was this eminent missionary, that before the year seventeen hundred and

+ A rotume ef these conferences was published in London in 1719, 8vo.

nineteen, he had completed a translation of the whole scriptures in the Tamul tongue; and had also composed a grammar and dictionary of the same language, which remain with us to this day.

11. The peculiar interest taken by King George the first in this primary endeavour to evangelize the Hindoos, will appear from the following letters ad. dressed to the missionaries by his Majesty.

"George, by the grace of God, King of Great Britain,

France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &C.
To the reverend and learned Bartholomew Ziegen.
balgius and Fohn Ernest Grundlerus, missionaries
at Tranquebar in the East Indies.

“REVEREND AND BELOVED, “Your letters dated the twentieth of January, of the present year, were most welcome to us; not only because the work undertaken by you of converting the heathen to the Christian faith, doth by the grace of God prosper, but also because that in this our kingdom such a laudable zeal for the promotion of the gospel prevails...

"We pray you may be endued with health and strength of body, that you may long continue to fulfil your ministry with good success; of which, as we shall be rejoiced to hear, so you will always find us ready to succour you in whatever may tend to promote your work and to excite your zeal. We as- : sure you of the continuance of our royal favour." Given at our palace of Hampton Court, the twenty

third of August, A. D. seventeen hundred and
seventeen, in the fourth year of our reign.

“GEORGE R.

Hattorf.”

12. The king continued to cherish with much so- , licitude the interests of the mission after the death of Ziegenbalgius; and in ten years from the date of

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