Imagining the Penitentiary: Fiction and the Architecture of Mind in Eighteenth-Century England

Etukansi
University of Chicago Press, 1987 - 337 sivua
This brilliant and insightful contribution to cultural studies investigates the role of literature—particularly the novel—and visual arts in the development of institutions. Arguing the attitudes expressed in narrative literature and art between 1719 and 1779 helped bring about the change from traditional prisons to penitentiaries, John Bender offers studies of Robinson Crusoe, Moll Flanders, The Beggar's Opera, Hogarth's Progresses, Jonathan Wild, and Amelia as well as illustrations from prison literature, art, and architecture in support of his thesis.
 

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Sisältö

1 Prison and the Novel as Cultural Systems
11
Moll Flanders and Robinson Crusoe
43
A Journal of the Plague Year
63
4 Generic Conflict and Reformist Discourse in Gay and Hogarth
87
Jonathan Wild in Fieldings Career
139
6 Fielding and the Juridical Novel
165
7 The Aesthetic of Isolation as Social System
201
A Postscript on Transparency as Practice
231
Notes
253
Index
315
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Tietoja kirjoittajasta (1987)

John Bender, professor of English and comparative literature at Stanford University, is the author of Spenser and Literary Pictorialism. Imagining the Penitentiary was awarded the 1987 Louis Gottschalk Prize of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies.

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