The Cambridge History of Japan

Etukansi
Job and Gertud Tamaki Professor of Japanese Studies Henry M Jackson School of International Studies Kozo Yamamura, John Whitney Hall, Delmer M. Brown, Kozo Yamamura, Cambridge University Press, Marius B. Jansen, William H. McCullough, Donald H. Shively, Peter Duus
Cambridge University Press, 1988 - 736 sivua
This third volume in The Cambridge History of Japan is devoted to the three and a half centuries spanning the final decades of the twelfth century when the Kamakura bakufu was founded, to the mid-sixteenth century when civil wars raged following the effective demise of the Muromachi bakufu. Volume 3 contains thirteen specially commissioned essays written by leading Japanese and American scholars that survey the historical events and developments in medieval Japan's polity, economy, society, and culture, as well as its relations with its Asian neighbors. The essays reflect the most recent scholarly research on the history of this period. The volume creates a rich tapestry of the events that took place during these colorful centuries, when the warrior class ruled Japan, institutions underwent fundamental transformations, the economy grew steadily, and Japanese culture and society evolved with surprising vitality to leave legacies that still characterize and affect contemporary Japan.
 

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Sisältö

Introduction
1
Discussion of the chapters in this volume
12
Concluding notes
27
Selected bibliography
39
The Kamakura bakufu
46
Medieval shöen
89
The decline of the Kamakura bakufu
128
Japan after the Mongol wars
148
The sengoku daimyo and the peasants
341
Acceleration of commerce and monetization
360
Commerce and cities in the Nambokuchó
376
Conclusion
394
Io Cultural life in medieval Japan
447
The age of Shinkokinshū poetry
453
The noh theater
462
The evolution of new interior settings for the arts
468

The fall of the Kamakura bakufu
160
The Muromachi bakufu
175
The founding of the Muromachi bakufu
183
The path to Ashikaga legitimacy
189
shugo ca 1400
195
The Muromachi distribution of power
201
instruments
211
Panorama Edo and
217
administration and enforcement
219
FIGURES
220
The last hundred years
225
Introduction
231
The relationship between shugo and kokujin
253
The decline of the shöen system
261
The development of the shugo domainal system
272
Peasants protest and growth
280
The collapse of the shöen proprietors authority
289
the disappearance of the shöen
298
Land development and agricultural operations
310
The economic life of the peasants
324
The regional consolidation of peasant society
330
The Higashiyama epoch and the scholarship
481
The culture of tea
488
Genre painting and AzuchiMomoyama humanism
495
The case of Mugai Nyodai
502
Working for a living
511
Election of the gods
518
Akashi no Kakuichi
531
Conclusion
541
I2 Buddhism in the Kamakura period
544
The originators of Kamakura Buddhism
555
The formation of religious organizations
571
Conclusion
580
The development of the Zen monastic institution
596
The growth of Zen schools thirteenth to sixteenth
597
Economy and administration of the medieval
637
Changes in Zen practice culture and the monastic
643
Works cited
653
Glossary
687
Index
702
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