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(21.) Of Forgiveness of sins--promised by God on repentance, Ex. 34. 6; 2 Chr. 7. 14; Ps. 32. 1; 103.3; 130. 4; Pr. 28. 13; Is. 1. 18; 55. 7 ; Jer. 31. 34; Dan. 9. 9, 24; Mark 1. 4; Luke 1. 77; 3. 3 ; 24. 47; Acts 2. 38; 5. 31; 8. 22; 10. 43; 13. 38; Rom 3. 25; Col. 1. 14; Heb. 8. 12; James 5. 15; 1 John 2. 12 ;-to be sought with the whole heart, Deut. 4. 29; 1 Chr. 28. 9; Ps. 119. 2; Jer. 29. 13; 1 Thess. 5. 17.*

(22.) Of Regeneration, or a change of heart and life,—necessary, John 1. 13; 3. 3; Rom. 12. 2; 2 Cor. 4. 16; 5. 17 ; Gal. 6. 15; Eph. 4. 22; Col. 3. 8; 1 Pet. 1. 23; 1 John 3. 9; 5. 4, 18;-represented by baptism, John 3. 5; Rom. 6. 4; Col. 2. 12; Tit. 3. 5;-applied to the resurrection, Matt. 19, 28; Rom. 8. 11; 1 Cor. 15. 42.*

(23.) Of the Righteousdescribed, Ps. 112.5; Pr. 12.10; 13.5; 21.12; Mat. 12. 35; John 1. 47 ;—under several characters, 2 Chr. 34. 2; Ps. 15. 1, &c.; 37. 21; 112. 5; Pr. 10. 20; 12. 5, 10; 13. 5; 15. 28; 21. 26; 28. 1; 29.7; Ezek. 18. 5, &c.; Mark 6. 20; Luke 1. 6; Acts 10. 1, &c.; 11. 24; Rom. 5.7;—and wicked compared, Ps. 1. 37. 49. 58. 73; Pr. 4. 16; 14. 9; 28. 1, &c.; Is. 3. 10;—have the same fate in this world, Ec. 7. 15; 8. 14; 9. 2;—their happiness and privileges, Ps. 37. 23; Pr. 12. 2; 13. 22; 14. 14 ; 28. 5; Is. 33. 15; Rom. 2. 10; 5.7; 10. 5, 9; 2 Cor. 3. 18; Eph. 2. 19; Col. 1. 12; 3.4; Heb. 12. 14; 1 John 3. 2; Rev. 2. 7, 11, 17, 26, 28; 3. 5, 12, 21; 22. 14; Ps. 116. 15. « Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of his saints.” That is, the Lord accounts the death of His saints of so much importance, that He will not suffer their enemies to cut them off before his appointed time; all the circumstances of their death being regulated by infinite wisdom and love for their final and eternal benefit. t-Salt of the earth, and light of the world, Mat. 5. 13, 14;-sons of God, Rom. 8. 14, &c.; 1 John 3. 1, 2;-one with Christ and the Father, John 17. 11, 21; temple of God, 1 Cor. 3. 16;—free from trouble, Ps. 91. 14; Pr. 1. 33; 16. 7; Is. 32. 17 ; Rev. 7. 16; 21. 4;-to be remembered with respect, Ps. 112. 6; Pr. 10. 7;—to be blessed in their posterity, Ex. 25. 5, 6; Deut. 4. 40; 12. 25; Ps. 37. 26; 103. 17; Pr. 11. 21; 12. 7; 14. 26 ; 20.7; Luke 1. 50;--to inherit eternal life, Dan. 12. 2; Luke 18. 30; John 3. 15; 4. 14; Rom. 2. 7; 1 Tim. 6. 19; Tit. 1. 2; 1 John 2. 25; Jude 21.*

(24.) Of the Wickedcharacterised, Job 24. 2; Ps. 10.3; 36. 1; 37.21; 50. 17; 58. 3; Pr, 2. 12; 4. 16; 6.12; 16. 27; 21. 10; 24. 2; Is. 59. 3; Ezek. 18. 10; 22.6; Rom. 1. 29; 3. 11, &c.;-compared to despicable things, Ps. 1. 4; 58. 4; 59. 6; Is. 57. 20; Jer. 6. 30; Ezek. 2. 6; Hos. 13. 3; Mat. 7.6, 26;—not to be envied, Ps. 37. 1; 73. 2; Pr. 23. 17; 24. 1, 19; Jer. 12. 1;—no peace to them, Is. 57. 21;—their punishment in general, Job 15. 20; 18. 5; 20. 4; 27. 13;—due to them in this life, Ps. 11. 6; Pr. 11. 19, 21; 21. 15; 22. 8; Is. 57. 21;

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Rom. 2. 8; Ps. 129, 6, 7. “ Let them be as the grass upon the housetops, which withereth afore it groweth up; wherewith the mower filleth not his hand nor he that bindeth sheaves his bosom." As the tops of the houses in the East are flat, and covered with plaister of terrace, they are frequently grown over with grass, or other vegetable productions ; but, from the want of proper nourishment, it is but small and weak, and from its elevation, being exposed to the scorching sun, it is soon withered. If grass, the mower cannot make hay of it; if corn, the reaper cannot make a sheaf of it. A more beautiful and striking figure, to display the weak and evanescent condition of wicked men, cannot easily be conceived. *—Abandonment to their own lusts, Ps. 81. 13; Is. 63. 17;subjection to terror, Ps. 53. 5; Pr. 28. 1;_exposure to shame, Ps. 53. 5; Pr. 3. 35;—the ruin of their family and name, Ps. 34. 16; 37. 28; 104. 35; Pr. 2. 22; 12.7; 14. 11; 24. 20;-without hope, Job 8. 13; Ps. 112. 10; Pr. 10. 28; 11.7;-eternal, Is. 66.24; Dan. 12. 2; Mat. 18. 8; 25. 41, 46; Mark 3. 29; 9. 43; Luke 3. 17; 2 Thess. 1.9; Jude 7;—in proportion to guilt, Mat. 11. 22, &c.; 23. 14; Luke 12. 47;examples, in Cain, Gen, 4. 11;-Er, the son of Judah, 38. 7 ;-of the family of Eli, 1 Sam. 2. 31 ;-of Eli and his sons, 4. 11, 18;—of Gehazi, 2 Kings 5. 27;—of Sennacherib, 19. 35, 37;—of Judas Iscariot, Acts 1. 18;—of Ananias and Sapphira, 5. 1;—of king Herod, 12. 23 ;-of Elymas, 13. 11.f It seems to have been a maxim among the ancient heathen, θεου ονειδος του κακους ευδαιμονειν· «The prosperity of the wicked is a reproach to God ;' but they had no just conception of a state of future rewards and punishments. I

(25.) Of Predestination,—the means of our redemption, and the propagation of the gospel, were predestinated, Gen. 3. 15; 12. 3; 49.10; Ps. 41.9; Mat. 16. 18; Luke 18. 33; John 7. 30; 8. 20; 13. 21; Acts 16.7; Rom. 9. 9; Eph. 5. 1, 11 ;--the establishment of Israel in Canaan, and the destruction of several wicked states and kingdoms, predestinated, Gen. 12. 7; 13. 15; Ex. 7. 4; 9. 16; Deut. 2. 30; Josh. 11. 20; Is. 44. 28; 46. 9;—particular persons have been predestinated to advance God's glory, and to serve his purposes in different manners: Pharaoh, Ex. 9. 16;—the Canaanites, Josh. 11. 20;-Cyrus, Is. 44. 28;–Jeremiah, Jer. 1. 5;-Paul, Acts 9. 15; Gal. 1. 15;—the gnostics, Jude 4;—the apostles, Luke 10. 20; 12. 32 ;—the first Christians, Acts 2. 47;—some Christians at Antioch, 13. 48;—some persons have been predestinated to grace and glory, Luke 10. 20; 12. 32; Acts 13. 48; Rom. 8. 28; 9. 29; Eph. 1.4; 2 Tim. 1. 9; 1 Pet. 2.8; God frequently produces good from men's evil intentions, and evil from their good intentions; and this is represented as his predestination, Gen. 50. 20; Job 5. 12; Ps. 33. 10; 127. 1; Prov. 16. 9, 33; 19. 21;—God is frequently mentioned as disposing of the good things of this world according to his will and pleasure, in such terms as imply his predestination of those matters; as Deut. * Comprehensive Bible, Note in loco.

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8. 18; 1 Chr. 29. 12; 2 Chr. 1. 11; Job 1. 21; 9. 12; Ps. 75. 7 ; Dan. 4. 17, &c.;-grace is necessary for the performance of our duty; and as it can be obtained only in the use of means, they who neglect the means are said to be predestinated to destruction, and those who use them, to life; Acts 3. 47; Rom. 3. 24; Eph. 1. 4; 1 Thess. 5. 9; 1 Pet. 2. 8; Jude 4, &c.*

(26.) Of Election—an act of distinguishing love, Deut. 7.8;—irrespective of any merit in the objects of it, Rom. 9. 11, 12, 16; Rom. 11. 5, 6. “ Even so then at this present time also there is a remnant according to the election of grace.” i. e. The election which proceeds from the mercy and goodness of God. “ And if by grace, then is it no more of works ; otherwise grace is no more grace. But if it be of works, then is it no more grace : otherwise work is no more work.” That is, it loses its character, or nature,—that of claiming reward as a matter of right.t-Eternal, Eph. 1. 4; 2 Thess. 2.13 ;-abiding, Rom. 9. 11; 2 Tim. 2. 19;--personal, Mat. 20.23; 2 Tim. 2. 19 ;-of some of the chief of sinners, 1 Tim. 1.15; -it is in Christ, Eph. 1. 4;—it is to holiness as the means, and salvation as the end, Eph. 1.4; 1 Thess., 5.9.*

(27.) Of Prayer,—the obligation and use of it, 2 Chr. 7. 14; Ps. 105. 4; Is. 63. 15, &c.; Mat. 7.7; Luke 18. 1; Phil. 4. 6; Col. 4. 2; 1 Tim. 2. 1; 1 Pet. 1. 17;

:-a due preparation for it, Ps. 66. 18; 145. 18; Pr. 15. 8, 29; 28. 9 ; Is. 1. 15; 29. 13; 59. 2; Mark 7.6; 11. 25; John 9. 31; 1 Tim. 2. 8; Jam. 1. 6; 4. 3;-with fervour, Ps. 59. 17; Luke 6. 12; 11. 8; 18. 1; Rom. 12. 12; Eph. 6. 18 ;--frequent, Ps. 55. 17; 86.3; 119. 164; Dan. 6. 10; Luke 2. 37; 18. 1; 21. 36; Acts 10. 2; 1 Thess. 3. 10; 5. 17; 1 Tim. 5.5; 2 Tim. 1.3; 1 Pet. 4.7;-without ostentation, Mat. 6. 6; Luke 18. 11 ;--without vain repetitions, Ecc. 5. 2; Mat. 6. 7 ;– for all conditions of men, Eph. 6. 18; 1 Tim. 2. 1;in the name of Christ, John 14. 13; 15. 16; 16. 23; Eph. 5. 20; Heb. 13. 15; 1 Pet. 2. 5;-in public, Luke 1. 10; Acts 1. 4, 24 ; 2. 42; 21. 5;-in private, Ps. 66. 16; Dan. 6. 10; Mat. 6. 6; 14. 23; Luke 6. 12; Acts 10. 9, 30;—its prevalence when properly made, Ps. 34. 15; 145. 18; Is. 30. 19; Jer. 29. 12; Mat. 7. 7; John 15. 7; Jam. 1. 5; 5. 14; 1 Pet. 3. 12; 1 John 3. 22; 5. 14;-examples of it, of Abraham's servant, Gen. 24. 12 ;-of Jacob, Gen. 32. 9 ;-of Moses, Ex. 32. 11, 31; Deut. 3. 23; Num. 14. 13—19; where we have the words of the earnest intercession of Moses : they need no explanation; they are full of simplicity and energy. His arguments with God, for he did reason and argue with his Maker, are pointed, cogent, and respectful; and while they shew a heart full of humanity, they evince the deepest concern for the glory of God. The argumentum ad hominem is here used in the most unexceptionable manner, and with the fullest effect. He does not in the least excuse the sin of Israel, or object to the justice of the awful sentence, or argue that such conduct would not consist with the divine truth or

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goodness; but he pleads the appearance which it would have, and the construction which the Egyptians and other neighbouring nations would put upon it; and he further pleads the name of the Lord, and the example of his former forgiveness.*—Of Samson, Judg. 16. 28;—of Hannah for a child, 1 Sam. 1. 10;—of David, 2 Sam. 7. 18; 1 Chr. 29. 10; Ps. 5. 1, &c. &c. &c. ;-of Solomon at the dedication of the temple, 1 Kings 8. 22; 2 Chr. 6. 12; Solomon having ascended the brazen scaffold, and stood up and blessed the people, he kneeled down upon his knees, and offered up a comprehensive and most excellent prayer, in which he puts seven cases, in all of which the mercy and intervention of God would be indispensably requisite; and he earnestly bespeaks that mercy and intervention, on condition that the people pray towards that holy place; and with a feeling heart, make earnest supplication to the throne of mercy.* -of Hezekiah, 2 Kings 19. 15; 20. 2 ;-of Manasseh in his distress, 2 Chr. 33. 12;—of Jeremiah, ch. 32. 16—25. A prayer, for weight of matter, sublimity of expression, profound veneration, just conception, Divine unction, powerful pleading, and strength of faith, seldom equalled, and never excelled. Historical, without flatness; condensed, without obscurity; confessing the greatest of crimes against the most righteous of Beings, without despairing of His mercy or presuming on His goodness; -a confession that acknowledges that God's justice should smite and destroy, had not His infinite goodness said, I will pardon ;*—of Daniel, Dan. 9. 3;—of Jonah, Jon. 2. 1, &c.;~of Habakkuk, Hab. 3. 1, &c. in which having nervously painted the desolate state of Judea during the captivity, he, in the two following verses (18, 19,) exhibits the finest display of his resignation, confidence, and holy triumph in the God of his salvation. He saw that the evil, which the Spirit of God enabled him to paint in all its calamitous circumstances, was at hand, and unavoidable ; he submitted to this dispensation of Providence; and confided in His mercy and goodness.* “Although the fig tree shall not blossom, neither shall fruit be in the vines; the labour of the olive shall fail, and the fields shall yield no meat; the flock shall be cut off from the fold, and there shall be no herd in the stalls: yet I will rejoice in the Lord, I will joy in the God of my salvation. The Lord God is my strength, and he will make my feet like hinds' feet, and he will make me to walk upon mine high places.”—Of Asa, 2 Chr. 14. 11;-of Jehoshaphat, 20. 6;—of Ezra, 9. 6;—of the Levites, Neh. 9. 5;—of Esther, Esth. 4. 16;-of Amos, Am. 7. 2, 5;—of Zacharias for a son, Luke 1. 13 ;-of Jesus at the resurrection of Lazarus, John 11. 41;—for his disciples, 17. 1, &c. ;-in the garden, Mat. 26. 39;-of Cornelius, Acts 10. 1;- for others, of Abraham for Abimelech, Gen. 20. 17;—Isaac for his wife, 25. 21;Moses for the people, Ex. 32. 11; 33. 12; Num. 11. 2;—for Miriam, 12. 13 ;—of Samuel for the people, 1 Sam. 12. 23 ;—of the Christians for Peter, Acts 12. 5;-of Je for his executioners, Luke 23. 34;--of

Stephen for his persecutors, Acts 7. 60;—of Paul for the Jews, Rom. 9; 10. 1;—of the church for him, Rom. 15. 30 ;—for Christians, 2 Cor. 1. 11; Eph. 1. 16; 6. 18; Col. 4. 3; 1 Thes. 5. 25; 2 Thes. 3. 1; Heb. 13. 18;—for enemies, Mat. 5. 44;-proper to precede great undertakings: of Elisha before he raised the dead child, 2 Kings 4. 33 ;—of Jesus before the appointment of the twelve apostles, Luke 6. 12 ;—of the apostles before the appointment of a successor to Judas Iscariot, Acts 1. 24.*

(28.) Of Praise of God,—exhortation to it, &c. Ps. 22. 23; 67.3; 69. 34; 119. 164; Is. 38. 19; Acts 2. 47; 16. 25. "The sacrifice of praise,' says St. Paul, “is the fruit of the lips.' (IIeb. 13. 15.) God creates this fruit of the lips, by giving new subject and cause of thanksgiving hy His mercies conferred on His people. The great subject of thanksgiving is peace ; reconciliation and pardon offered to them that are nigh, and to them that are far off; not only to the Jew, but also to the Gentile.f

(29.) Of Thanksgiving—a duty, Deut. 8. 10; Ps. 51. 14; 69. 30; 92. 1; 139. 14; 147. 1 ; Is. 25. 1, &c.; Col. 3. 17; 1 Thess. 5. 18; 1 Tim. 4. 4; Heb. 13. 15; 1 Pet. 2. 9, &c.

(30.) Of Worshipto be paid to God only, Ex. 20.4; Mat. 4. 10; Luke 4. 8; Acts 10. 25; 14. 13, &c.; Rev. 19. 10; 22. 8;—public, required, Deut. 26. 10, 11; 2 Kings 17. 36; Ps. 22. 22, 25; 35. 18; 95.6; 107. 32; 116. 14; 122. 1, 4; Mat. 18. 20; Acts 1. 14; 10. 33; Heb. 10. 25;—decency to be observed in it, Ecc. 5. 1; Joel 2. 15;-rules respecting it, 1 Cor. 11. 1, &c.; 14. 1, &c.

(31.) Of the Scriptures-given by inspiration, 2 Tim. 3. 16;—their use, Rom. 15. 4;-how to be received, Jam. 1. 21 ;—their blessings when received, Rom. 1. 16; 1 Cor. 1. 18; Eph. 2. 1, &c.; 1 Pet. 1;—danger of rejecting them, Mark 16. 16; Luke 10. 16; John 3, 36; 12. 48; Heb. 2. 3; 10. 28; 12. 25; Luke 16: 31. “If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded, though one rose from the dead :" From this answer of Abraham we learn, that the Sacred Writings contain such proofs of a divine origin, that though all the dead were to rise, the proofs could not be more evident, nor the couviction greater; and that to escape eternal perdition, and obtain eternal glory, a man is to receive the testimonies of God, and to walk according to their dictates. ITo be frequently meditated upon, Deut. 6.6; 11. 18; Ps. 1. 2; 119. 97; John 5. 39; 2 Pet. 3. 2;-a privilege of the Jews, Rom. 3. 2;-designed for universal use, Rom. 15. 4; 1 Cor. 10, 11;—the advantage of the study of them, Ps. 19, 7; 119. 9, 72, 98, 103; Rom. 15. 4; Eph. 6. 17; 2 Tim. 3. 15; Jam. 1. 25.

(32.) Of the Church-holy catholic, how to be understood, John 10. 16; Rom. 12. 5; 1 Cor. 10. 17; 12, 13; Gal. 3. 28; Heb. 11.40; 12. 23 ;sometimes means the whole congregation of faithful people, Matt. 16. 18; Acts 2. 47; Eph. 3. 10, 21 ; Col. 1. 24;-sometimes a national, local, or private congregation, Acts 14. 27 ; 18. 22; Rom. 16. 5; 1 Cor. 14. 23;

• Comprehensive Bible, Iudex to Subjects, in voce. + Idem, on Is. 57. 19. | Idem, Note in loco.

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