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JOSEPH ADDISON.......

286

SAMUEL JOHNSON...........

500

A Letter from Italy...

286 London.................................

500

The Campaign..........

288 The Vanity of Human Wishes.......

502

To Sir Godfrey Kneller......

291 Prologue, spoken by Mr. Garrick....

Paraphrase on Psalm XXIII.........

292 On the Death of Mr. Robert Levet....

505

An Ode.

292

WILLIAM SHENSTONE....

507

Isaac Watts...

293

The School-Mistress......

507

There is a Land.....

293

510

Come, Holy Spirit........

A Pastoral Ballad....

511

Alas I and did my Saviour bleed

293

The Dying Kid....

513

Away from Every Mortal Care..

294

Psalm XLVI.....

294

THOMAS GRAY ......

On Vicissitude .....

514

Psalm XC..

Hymn to Advereity.....

515

Psalm CXVII.

294

Elegy written in a Country Churchyard.... 615

THOMAS PARNELL.....

295

The Progress of Poesy...............

516

A Night-Piece on Death..

295

Ode on the Spring.............

517

The Hermit....

296

Ode for Music........

518

EDWARD YOUNG.......

298 Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat........ 519

The Complaint: or, Night Thoughts :

Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College... 519

Night the First.

299 The Bard.......

520

Night the Second.

302 The Fatal Sisters.....

Night the Third.

The Descent of Odin.

523

Night the Fourth..

311 The Triumphs of Owen...

523

Night the Fifth......

TOBIAS SMOLLETT.........

525

Night the Sixth...

325

The Tears of Scotland..

Night the Seventh....

332

525

Ode to Leven Water..

Night the Eighth ..

344

Ode to Independence...

526

Night the Ninth......
354

529

ALEXANDER POPE..

MARK AKENSIDE.......

The Rape of the Lock....

374

The Virtuosò......

Prologue to Mr. Addison's Tragedy of Cato.. 300 The Pleasures of Imagination :

380

Book I......

Eloisa to Abelard........

529

383

Book II.....

The Temple of Fame.....

533

The Fable of Dryope.

Book III......

Vertumnus and Pomona...

Ode to the Right Honorable Francis, Earl of

An Essay on Man:

Huntingdon.....

514

Hymn to the Naiads.....

*846

Epistle I....

389

Epistle II......

391

Ode to the Right Rev. Benjamin, Lord Bishop

Epistle III.....

548

394

of Winchester.....

Epistle IV......

396

| WILLIAM COLLINS......

Moral Essays:

Ode to Pity.....

550

Epistle I......

Ode to Fear...

551

Epistle II.

Ode, written in the Year 1746....

Epistle III.....

404

Ode on the Death of Colonel Charles Ross..... 552

Epistle IV.

Ode to Evening.......

552

Epistle V.

409 Ode to Liberty......

5.53

Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot...

The Passions......

Messiah ...

Dirge in Cymbeline...

Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady. 414 An Ode on the Popular Superstitions of the

Highlands of Scotland..

Ode on the Death of Mr. Thomsou .....

• Mortimer.........

...... 416

JOSEPH and THOMAS WARTON........

559

The Dying Christian to

Ode to Fancy............

... 416

Contentment.

The Universal Prayer....

560

Verses written at Montauban in France...

... 417

Ode to the First of April.........

561

Joux GAY..........

418

Ode. The Crusade.....

Rural Sports......

The Progress of Discontent...

562

Trivia.....

421

Inscription in a Hermitage.

563

Sweet William's Farewell to Black-Eyed Susan. 431

Ode. The Ilamlet..........

561

A Ballad...

Ode sent to a Friend.......

Fables:

The Pleasures of Melancholy...

565

The Goat without a Beard......

The Universal Apparition.............

OLIVER GOLDSMITH..

568

The Jugglers..............

The Traveller........

The Hare and Many Friends.....

The Deserted Village

The Farmer's Wife and the Raven..

The Hermit.......

The Turkey and the Ant......

Elegy on a Mad Dog ....

An Elegy on the Glory of her Sex, Mrs. Mary

John DYER........

Blaize ........

Grongar Hill...

Stanzas on Woman....

The Ruins of Rome..

436

Song....................

577

JAMES THOYBOX...

441

Rule Britannia !...

WILLIAM FALCONER....

578

The Shipwreck.....

558

Ode .....

Song....

WILLIAM COWPER.....

To the Rev. Mr. Murdoch.

442 Boadicea.....

604

Song..

'Heroism.......

The Happy Man....

On the Receipt of my Mother's Picture out of

The Seasons :

Norfolk.....

605

Spring..........

443 Friendship...

606

Summer.....

452 The Task:

Autunnn....

Book I. The Sofa...

607

Winter .....

475 Book II. The Tiine-Piece.....

613

A Hymn......

483 Book III. The Garden.................

The Castle of Indolence....

481 Book IV. The Winter Evening.......

CHARLES WESLEY.

498 Book V. The Winter Morning Walk......

Jesus, Lover of my Soul.....

499 Book VI. The Winter Walk at Noon......

Death .....

498 Verses supposed to be written by Alexander

Jesus, my Strength, my Hope............

499

Selkirk........

Wrestling Jacob.......

499 The Diverting History of John Gilpin.......... 617

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786

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The Auld Farmer's New-Year Morning Salu-

tation to his Auld Mare Maggie..... 733
To a Mouse............

784
A Winter's Night....
Despondency........

785

Winter......

The Cotter's Saturday Night...

736
Man was made to mourn....

738
A Prayer in the Prospect of Death..

739
Stauzas on the Same Occasion......

739
The First Psalm..........

739
A Prayer.............::
The First Six Verees of the Ninetieth Psalm.. 740
To a Mountain Daisy.
To Ruin.....
To Miss L .....

741
Epistle to a Young Friend..

741
On a Scotch Bard gone to the West Indies. 742
To a Haggis.....

742

A Dedication to Gavin Hamilton, Esq.

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An Epistle to Joseph Hill, Esg.........

649

Yardley Oak......

649

The Castaway....

651

JAMES BEATTIE.

The Minstrel:

Book I.

652

Book II...

656

The Hermit....................

661

AXNA LETITIA BARBAULD........

662

What do the Futures speak of?....

662

The Mouse's Petition...

662

The Death of the Virtuous....

663

Hymn ....

663

To-morrow....

Life.......

CHARLES DIBDIX.

664

Poor Tom Bowling.........

664

Poor Jack...

664

The Tar for All Weathers.

665

Bleak was the Morn.....

665

Jack come Home.......

665

Love me Evermore ...

666

The Standing Toast....

SIR WILLIAX JONES.....

An Ode in Imitation of Alcæus...

A Chinese Ode, paraphrased......

Hymn to Camdeo.................

THOMAS CHATTERTON...................

669

Bristowe Tragedy.....

672

Mynstrelles Songe.....

... 675

GEORGE CRABBE..........

Tales:

I. The Dumb Orators; or, the Benefit of

Society .........

II. The Parting Hour....

III. The Gentleman Farmer...

684

IV. Procrastination........

688

V. The Patron............

691

VI. The Frank Courtship.

697

VII. The Widow's Tale....

701

VIII. The Mother.

IX. Arabella.....

707

WILLIAX BLAKE.....

The Little Black Boy.....

711

The Garden of Love..

The Tiger....

712

On Another's Sorrow...

712

The Mental Traveller...

713

ROBERT BURNS......

714

The Twa Dogs.........

716

Death and Dr. Hornboo

718

The Brigs of Ayr......

719

The Death and Dying W rds of Poor Mailie

Poor Mailie's Elegy......

To J.S.........

A Dream ..................................

The Vision............

Address to the Unco Guid......

Tam Samson's Elegy ........

Halloween.....................................

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758

A Red, Red Rose....................

758

"Ae Fond Kiss”.....................

759

The Bonnie Lad that's Far Awa......

759

Whistle o'er the Lave'o't.............. .... 759

The Author's Farewell to his Native Country..

1758

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GEOFFREY CHAUCER, “the morning-star of linn. The characters composing this party are English poetry," was born at London, in 1328 exceedingly well drawn in the Prologue to the or 1340—the former date being generally ac- Tales, which we copy in full, and which is uncepted by his biographers, while the high au-doubtedly the best and most characteristic part thority of Sharon Turner prefers that of 1340. of the work. Several of the tales have been Little is accurately known of his life. One of paraphrased by Dryden and Pope; and in this his biographers represents him to have studied volume, among the selections from Dryden, will both at Cambridge and at Oxford, while another be found his versions of “The Knight's Tale," doubts whether he was a member of any college. “ The Wife of Bath's Tale," and the character He is supposed to have been entered as a stu. of the Good Parson. dent at the Inner Temple; but the evidence of Chaucer was a man of the world, as well as a. this is said to be merely a record that one Geof student; a soldier, courtier, and diplomatist, and frey Chaucer was fined two shillings for beating | all his life employed in affairs of importance and a Franciscan friar in Fleet Street. It is certain, difficulty, during one of the most brilliant and however, that at an early age be had become ac- also one of the most disastrous periods of Eng. quainted with personages of distinction ; for he lish history. He began his public career in the was a page to King Edward III., and was re- warlike and magnificent reign of Edward III., warded by that monarch in 1367 with an annu- / and ended it amid the convulsions and misfority of twenty marks. He appears afterward to tunes of that of Richard II. He had consehave become gentleman of the bedchamber to quently a vast and varied experience of men and the king, and in 1370 was sent abroad as a royal of affairs when in the calm evening of his life, at envoy. Two years later, he was sent to Genoa the age of sixty, he composed his Canterbury to negotiate for a naval force. On his return, Tales in the quiet repose of his country home. he was made partial comptroller of the customs This work affords a good idea of his character. of London, and was granted a daily allowance Like Shakespeare, he seems to have possessed of a pitcher of wine from the king's table. He a cheerful and benignant disposition, fond of was again emploved on a diplomatic mission to mirth and joviality, vet studious in the midst of France in 1377, the year in which Edward III. a busy life. He had a keen sense of the ludi. died. Chaucer, in the mean time, had married crous, and a fine capacity for comic delineaPhilippa Rouet, one of the queen's maids of tion. He hated fraud and superstition, and honor, whose sister was the wife of a great noble satirized them keenly, though always with good -John of Gaunt, “time - honored Lancaster," nature. This high connection secured for Chaucer the The latest critic of Chaucer, M. Taine, in his favor of the new king, Richard II., by whom he “History of English Literature," describes him was repeatedly employed on important commis as a poet “who, by his genius, education, and sions in various parts of the kingdom. Richard life, was enabled to know and to depict a whole was deposed in 1399; but his successor, Henry | world; but, above all, to satisfy the chivalric IV., the son of the Duke of Lancaster, being world and the splendid courts which shone upon closely related to Chaucer by marriage, treated the heights. He belonged to it, though learned him with additional favor, and granted him a and versed in all branches of scholastic knowllarge increase of pension. Chaucer died in 1400, edge; and he took such part in it that his life

which he had leased in Westminster. I from end to end was that of a man of the world. and was buried in the Abbey—the first of the and a man of action. . . . Like Froissart-better long line of poets whose ashes make the edifice than he-Chaucer could depict the character of illustrious. He appears to have been an adhe the nobles, their mode of life, their amours, rent of the doctrines of the reformer Wycliffe, even other things, and please them by his porand to have been occasionally persecuted in traiture. . . . Beyond the two notable character. consequence; so that, for some years, he was | istics which settle his place in his age and school an exile in France and Denmark. He resided in of poetry, there are others which take him out the latter years of his life at Woodstock, and / of his age and school. If he was romantic and subsequently at Donnington Castle, where he gay like the rest, it was after-a fashion of his wrote his latest and greatest work, “ The Can own. He observes characters, notes their difterbury Tales.” The plan of this was modelled ferences, studies the coherence of their parts, upon the “Decameron" of Boccaccio. It repre- and endeavors to bring forward living and dissents a company of twenty-nine pilgrims on their tinct persons-a thing unheard of in his time, way to the shrine of Thomas à Becket at Canter- but which the renovators in the sixteenth cen. bury, assembling at the Tabard Inn in South- tury, and first among them Shakespeare, will do wark, and agreeing each to tell a tale in going afterward. It is the English good sense and and returning; he who should tell the best tale aptitude for seeing the inside of things begin. to be treated by the others with a supper at the ning to appear."

THE CANTERBURY TALES.

| Aboven alle nations in Pruce.

In Lettowe hadde he reysed 18 and in Ruce,. THE PROLOGUE.

No cristen man so ofte of his degre.

In Gernade 14 at the siege eke hadde he be .: W ANNE tlæt Ankit with his shoures sote!

Of Algesir, and ridden in Belmarie. 15 .: The droughte of Märch hath perced to the rote, | At Leves 16 was he, and at Satalie, 17

And båthed every veine in swiche ? licour, Whan they were wonne; and in the Grete see 18 ::.:08. whiche.vertue engendred is the flour;

At many a noble armee hadde he be. ::::Whari Zephiris eke with his sote brethe At mortal batailles hadde he ben fiftene, :Erspired haihoin wory holtes and hethe

And foughten for our faith at Tramissene The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne

In ligtes thries, and ay slain his fo. Hath in the Ram his halfe cours yronne,

This ilke worthy knight hadde ben also And smale foules" maken melodie,

Somtime with the lord of Palatie, 19 That slepen alle night with open eye,

Agen another hethen in Turkie: So priketh hem Nature in hir corages;

And evermore he hadde a sovereine pris. Than longen folk to gon on pilgrimages,

And though that he was worthy he was wise, And palmeres for to seken strange strondes, And of his port as meke as is a mayde. To serve halwes couthe" in sondry londes ; He never yet no vilanie ne sayde And specially, from every shires ende

In alle his lif, unto no manere 20 wight. Of Englelond, to Canterbury they wende,

He was a veray parfit gentil knight. The holy blisful martyr for to seke,

But for to tellen you of his araie, That hem hath holpen, whan that they were seke. His hors was good, but he ne was not gaie. Befelle, that, in that seson on a day,

Of fustian he wered a gipon, 21 In South werk at the Tabard as I lay,

Alle besmotred "' with his habergeon, Redy to wenden on my pilgrimage

For he was late ycome fro bis viage, 93
To Canterbury with devoute corage,

And wente for to don his pilgrimage.
At night was come into that hostelrie
Wel mine and twenty in a compagnie

With him ther was his sone a yonge squier, Of sondry folk, by aventure yfalle 6

A lover, and a lusty bacheler, In felawship, and pilgrimes were they alle, With lockes crull 24 as they were laide in presse. That toward Canterbury wolden ride.

Of twenty yere of age he was I gesse.
The chambres and the stables weren wide, | Of his stature he was of even lengthe,
And wel we weren esed' atte beste.

And wonderly deliver, 25 and grete of strengthe.
And shortly, whan the sonde was gon to reste, And he hadde be somtime in chevachie,
So hadde I spoken with hem everich on,8 In Flaundres, in Artois, and in Picardie,
That I was of hiro felawship anon,

And borne him wel, as of so litel space,
And made forword erly for to rise,

In hope to stonden in his ladies grace.
To take oure way ther as I you devise.

Embrouded was he, as it were a mede
But natheles, while I have time and space, Alle ful of freshe floures, white and rede.
Or that I forther in this tale pace,

Singing he was, or floyting of alle the day,
Me thinketh it accordant to reson,

He was as freshe, as is the moneth of May.
To tellen you alle the condition

Short was his goune, with sleves long and wide.
Of eche of hem, so as it semed me,

Wel coude he sitte on hors, and fayre ride.
And whiche they weren, and of what degre; | He coude songes make, and wel endite,
And eke in what araie that they were inne: Juste and eke dance, and wel pourtraie and write.
And at a knight than wol I firste beginne. So hote he loved, that by nightertale 27

He slep no more than doth the nightingale.
A knight ther was, and that a worthy man,

Curteis he was, lowly, and servisable,
That fro the time that he firste began

And carf before his fader at the table. 28
To riden out, he loved chevalrie,
Trouthe and honour, fredom and curtesie.

A yeman 29 hadde he, and servantes no mo
Ful worthy was he in his lordes werre,

At that time, for him luste to ride so;
And therto hadde he ridden, no man ferre, 10

And he was cladde in cote and hode of grene.
As wel in Cristendom as in Hethenesse,

A shefe of peacock arwes 30 bright and kene
And ever honoured for his worthinesse.

Under his belt he bare ful thriftily.
At Alisandre he was whan it was wonne. 11
Ful often time he hadde the bord begonne 12 13 Journeyed.

14 The city of Algezir was taken from the Moorish 1 Sweet ? Such. Grove. Birds. King of Granada in 1844.

16 Probably in Africa. o Known. Fallen. 7 Accommodated.

16 Layas, in Armenia.

17 Attalia. 8 Every one of them. . Their. 10 Farther. 18 Better, the “Grekish sea," i. e., the part of the Medi11 I. e., in A. D. 1865, by Pierre de Lusignan, King of terranean, from Sicily to Cyprus. Cyprus, who, however, immediately abandoned it.

10 Palathia in Anatolia 20 Meaner, inferior. 19 1. e. he had been placed at the head of the table :

21 A short cassock. 29 Smutted. 23 Journey. the usual compliment to extraordinary merit. When our 24 Curled.

26 Agile, nimble. military men wanted employment, it was usual for them 28 Playing on the flute. 27 Night-time. to go and serve in Pruse, or Prussia, with the knights of 38 It was anciently the custom for squires, of the highthe Teutonic order, who were in a state of constant war est quality, to carve at the sires' tables. fare with their heathen neighbours in Lettow (Lithuania), | 29 Yeman, or yeoman, is an abbreviation of yeongo Ruse (Russia), and elsewhere. A pagan King of Lettoro man, as youthe is of yeongthe. is mentioned by Walsingham, pp. 180, 848.-Tyrohitt.

by Walkingham. pp. 180. 848.-Tyrichitt. I 30 Arrows with peacock-feathers.

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