History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent, Nide 5

Etukansi
D. Appleton, 1884

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PAGE Jay capitulates and attempts to negotiate directly with Shelburne 567
69
CHAPTER VI
81
December 1126 1776
82
Congress adjourns to Baltimore Fortitude of Samuel Adams
88
CHAPTER VIII
100
Battle of Princeton Mercer mortally wounded Washington in the battle
106
Principles of the new constitutions for the states
112
Two houses except in Pennsylvania and Georgia How elected
116
Public worship in the several states
122
American commissioners wait on Vergennes The Count de Aranda
128
American privateers Demands of England Vergennes answers
134
The people of Germany Frederic of Prussia Court of Vienna
140
Lees treason What was thought of him in Europe
146
CHAPTER XII
156
Slavery forbidden The fight at Hubbardton
162
Rising of Herkimer and the German freeholders of the Mohawk valley
168
CHAPTER XIII
174
Strength of his army
175
Howe crosses the Schuylkill The British take Philadelphia
181
Burgoyne holds a council of war and offers battle
187
Washington attacks the British by surprise
193
Congress and the commissioners 273
195
The want of a general government keenly felt
199
The committee of states Mode of amending the confederation
205
His second advance Ile still fears to attack Returns to Philadelphia
210
Conduct of Washington His enemics shrink back from their purpose
216
Burgoynes troops detained Gist Heroism of Biddle
222
Switzerland The republic of the Netherlands
228
Charles Augustus of SaxeWeimar and his ministers
234
His reproof of the theft of Arthur Lees papers
240
CHAPTER XVIII
261
Washington pursues the British army
274

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Sivu 410 - Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate, than that these people are to be free ; nor is it less certain that the two races, equally free, cannot live in the same government.
Sivu 421 - ... on spreading the opportunities and advantages of education in the various parts of the country, and among the different orders of the people, it shall be the duty of legislatures and magistrates in all future periods of this commonwealth, to cherish the interests of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries of them, especially the University at Cambridge, public schools and grammar schools in the towns...
Sivu 329 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities.
Sivu 329 - ... truth is great and will prevail if left to herself; that she is the proper and sufficient antagonist to error, and has nothing to fear from the conflict, unless by human interposition disarmed of her natural weapons, free argument and debate, errors ceasing to be dangerous when it is permitted freely to contradict them...
Sivu 213 - I can assure those gentlemen, that it is a much easier and less distressing thing to draw remonstrances in a comfortable room by a good fireside, than to occupy a cold, bleak hill, and sleep under frost and snow, without clothes or blankets. However, although they seem to have little feeling for the naked and distressed soldiers, I feel superabundantly for them, and, from my soul, I pity those miseries, which it is neither in my power to relieve or prevent.
Sivu 224 - If I were an American as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms — never, never, never!
Sivu 414 - ... hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on the face of the earth...
Sivu 216 - SIR: — I find myself just able to hold the pen during a few minutes, and take this opportunity of expressing my sincere grief for having done, written, or said anything disagreeable to your Excellency. My career will soon be over, therefore justice and truth prompt me to declare my last sentiments. You are in my eyes the great and good man. May you long enjoy the love, veneration, and esteem of these States, whose liberties you have asserted by your virtues.
Sivu 224 - You may swell every expense, and every effort, still more extravagantly ; pile and accumulate every assistance you can buy or borrow ; traffic and barter with every little pitiful German prince that sells and sends his subjects to the shambles...
Sivu 249 - I will only add, to put before your eye my most inmost thoughts, that no advantage to this country, nor personal danger to myself, can ever make me address myself to Lord Chatham, or to any other branch of Opposition. Honestly, I would rather lose the Crown I now wear than bear the ignominy of possessing it under their shackles.

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